Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Where Your Treasure is So is Your Heart

Where Your Treasure is So is Your Heart

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY ROBERT SOUTH, D.D.


A DISCOURSE

PREACHED AT CHRIST CHURCH, OXON,
BEFORE THE UNIVERSITY,

OCTOBER 15, 1699.

Matt. vi. 21. where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.
BY ROBERT SOUTH, D.D.


A DISCOURSE

PREACHED AT CHRIST CHURCH, OXON,
BEFORE THE UNIVERSITY,

OCTOBER 15, 1699.

Matt. vi. 21. where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Sep 29, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/03/2014

pdf

text

original

 
WHERE YOUR TREASURE IS SO IS YOUR HEARTBY ROBERT SOUTH, D.D.A DISCOURSEPREACHED AT CHRIST CHURCH, OXO,BEFORE THE UIVERSITY,OCTOBER 15, 1699.Matt. vi. 21. where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.AS man is natiurally a creature of great want and weakness,he does as naturally carry a most intimate and insepa-rable sense of that want and weakness about him : and be-cause a state of want must needs be also a state of uneasiness,there is nothing which nature puts a man with so much forceand earnestness upon, as to attempt a supply and relief of thewants which he is so sensible of, and so incommoded by.Insomuch that the whole course of his actings, from first tolast, proceeds in this method. First, that every action whicha man does, is in order to his compassing or obtaining to him-self some, good thereby. And secondly, that he endeavoursto compass or obtain this good, because he desires it. Andthirdly and lastly, that he desires it, because he wants it ; orat least thinks that he does so. So that the first spring, whichsets all the wheels and faculties of the soul agoing, is a man'sapprehension of some good wanting to complete the happinessof his condition.Digitized by VjOOQ ICMatt, vi. 21.] o man ever went to heaven, Sfc. 47
 
But as every good is not in the same degree contribative tothis happiness^ so neither is it in the same degree desirable :and therefore, since want, as we have noted, is still the mea-sure, as well as ground of desire, that which answers all thewants, and fills all the vacuities of a rational nature, mustneeds be the fiill and ultimate object of its desires. And thiswas called by the philosophers, man's summum bonum ; andhere, by our Saviour, man^s treasure; both expressions im-porting a good, so comprehensively great, and equal to all theappetites of nature, that the presence and possession of thisalone renders a man happy, and the want or absence of itmiserable. Upon which account, though it be impossible thatthis prime or chief good should admit of any plurality, so asto be really more than one, yet in regard men take it in bytheir apprehensions, which are so ^ceedingly subject to errorand deception, even in their highest concerns, and since erroris various, and indeed infinite ; hence it is, that this treasure,or 9umfnum honnm, falls under a very great multiplicity ; thisman proposing to himself one thing, and that man another,and a third^something else for his chief good ; and that, fromwhich alone he expects all that happiness and satisfaction,which the condition of his nature renders him either capableor desirous of.ow the words of the text may be considered two ways :I. As they are an entire proposition in themselves. And,II. As they are an argument relating to and enforcing of aforegoing precept, in the 19th and 20th verses : and accord-ingly, in the prosecution of them, we shall take in bothconsiderations.And first, if we take them, as they are an entire propositionin themselves, so they ofier us these two things :1. Something supposed, which is, that every man has some-thing or other which he accounts his treasure, or chief good.And,
 
2. Something expressly declared, namely, that whatsoevera man accounts his treasure, or chief good, upon that he placeshis heart, his whole desires and affections. And,1. For the thing supposed or implied in the words ; to wit,>that every man has something or other which he accountsDigitized by VjOOQ IC48 o man ever went to heaven, [Serm. 48.his treasure, or chief good. The truth and certainty of whichproposition will appear founded upon these two things :1. The activity of man's mind. And,2. The method of his acting. And,1. For the first of these. The mind of man is of that spiri-tuous, stirring nature, that it is perpetually at work. Some-thing it is still in pursuit of, either by contemplation or desire:the foundation of which latter, I shew, was want; and con-sequently, Bs man Mdll be always wanting something or other,so he will be always sending forth his desires to hunt after,and bring that thing in, which he wants : which is so true,that some men having compassed the greatest and noblest ob- jects of their desires, (so that desire could no longer ascend,as being already at the top,) they have betook themselves toinferior and ignoble exercises; so that amongst the Romanemperors, (then lords of a great part of the world,) we findero at his harp, Domitian kiUing flies, and Commodus play-ing the fencer; and all this only to busy themselves someway or other ; nothing being so grievous and tedious tohuman nature as perfect idleness.But now, there is not any thing (though never so mean and

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->