Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Military Resistance 11I15 Inevitable

Military Resistance 11I15 Inevitable

Ratings: (0)|Views: 21|Likes:
Published by paola3429
Transition is the last of the four stages of our counter-insurgency policy (clear, hold, build, transfer) but not one of the first three stages has been achieved, anywhere. Nowhere has been cleared of the Taliban. Even in towns like Marjah and Sangin, which have seen massive concentrations of coalition and Afghan forces, the Talban still have access to the local population (often because they are the local population) and can still plant IEDs, snipers and ambushes within easy walking distance of coalition patrol bases...Every Afghan I have spoken to is convinced that another round of civil war is inevitable (if it hasn’t started already) and that there will be no rules of engagement or courageous restraint. They also think that the Taliban may well win. Perhaps the most damning indictment of our intervention is that there are also many Afghans who think that in the event of such a victory, the good guys will have won ....
Transition is the last of the four stages of our counter-insurgency policy (clear, hold, build, transfer) but not one of the first three stages has been achieved, anywhere. Nowhere has been cleared of the Taliban. Even in towns like Marjah and Sangin, which have seen massive concentrations of coalition and Afghan forces, the Talban still have access to the local population (often because they are the local population) and can still plant IEDs, snipers and ambushes within easy walking distance of coalition patrol bases...Every Afghan I have spoken to is convinced that another round of civil war is inevitable (if it hasn’t started already) and that there will be no rules of engagement or courageous restraint. They also think that the Taliban may well win. Perhaps the most damning indictment of our intervention is that there are also many Afghans who think that in the event of such a victory, the good guys will have won ....

More info:

Published by: paola3429 on Sep 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/12/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Military Resistance:thomasfbarton@earthlink.net 9.29.13
Print it out: color best. Pass it on.
 
Military Resistance 11I15
 
“Every Afghan I Have Spoken ToIs Convinced That Another RoundOf Civil War Is Inevitable”
“They Also Think That The TalibanMay Well Win”
“Perhaps The Most Damning IndictmentOf Our Intervention Is That There AreAlso Many Afghans Who Think That In
 
The Event Of Such A Victory, The GoodGuys Will Have Won”
Excerpt from
No Worse Enemy
; Ben Anderson; Oneworld Books; London 2011Transition is the last of the four stages of our counter-insurgency policy (clear, hold,build, transfer) but not one of the first three stages has been achieved, anywhere.Nowhere has been cleared of the Taliban.Even in towns like Marjah and Sangin, which have seen massive concentrations of coalition and Afghan forces, the Talban still have access to the local population (oftenbecause they are the local population) and can still plant IEDs, snipers and ambusheswithin easy walking distance of coalition patrol bases.Many British and American troops have told me that ‘we only control as far as we see’.This means that armed men are no longer seen in the (literally) few square kilometresaround the urban district centres and patrol bases, but that is all.Even within the district centres, the Taliban attend, unannounced, the shuras held byforeign troops, as is well known by every American or British officer who chairs them.The Taliban also allow people to take whatever foreign forces offer them, as long as theyalso give the Taliban free passage, cover and food whenever they need it, thus ensuringa stalemate, at best.Such a state of uneasy co-existence can hardly be described as ‘holding’, much lesswinning.In areas where such a stalemate has led to some semblance of security reconstructionand development has been woefully inadequate — the vast majority of our resourceshaving been devoted to our troops providing security for themselves.Because we have not achieved any of the first three stages of our policy, transferring to Afghan security forces should be a long way off. Instead the process has been sped up.Transition, in this context, is a sickening euphemism masking a humiliating failure.The only glimmer of hope is if we and then the Afghan security forces vanish from thesouthern provinces, then the grievances of the insurgents there may vanish too andthere will be no reason for them to fight (although this doesn’t apply to the Taliban weoverthrew in 2001 and who are now in Pakistan).If this proves to be true, it starkly underlines our failures: after eleven years of fighting,the best thing we can do, for ail concerned, is simply to leave.
 
Every Afghan I have spoken to is convinced that another round of civil war is inevitable(if it hasn’t started already) and that there will be no rules of engagement or courageousrestraint.They also think that the Taliban may well win.Perhaps the most damning indictment of our intervention is that there are also many Afghans who think that in the event of such a victory, the good guys will have won.
AFGHANISTAN WAR REPORTS
DoD IDs Fort Campbell Soldier Killed InAfghanistan Insider Attack
Sep. 27, 2013 Army TimesFORT CAMPBELL, KY. — The Defense Department says a Fort Campbell soldier hasdied after being struck by enemy fire in Afghanistan.The military says 31-year-old Staff Sgt. Thomas A. Baysore Jr. of Milton, Pa., diedThursday in Paktya province, Afghanistan.The Army says Baysore was killed by an enemy combatant wearing an Afghan National Army Uniform who opened fire on a group of soldiers. He was struck on the left side of his neck.Baysore was taken to taken to his post aid station where he succumbed to his wounds.Baysore was assigned to Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4thBrigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Ky., as a squad leader.He joined the Army in June 2001 and was stationed at Camp Ederle, Italy, where he hada variety of assignments, including vehicle driver, rifleman, automatic rifleman, and fireteam leader. He was also assigned to the Harrisburg Recruiting Battalion., in Harrisburg,Pa., as a recruiter.Following his assignment there, Baysore arrived at Fort Campbell, Ky., in August 2010.This was his third deployment to Afghanistan. He deployed once prior to arriving to FortCampbell, Ky., in 2005, and again with the Division in 2010. He also deployed to Iraq inMarch 2003.Baysore is survived by his spouse, Jamie L. Baysore of Clarksville, Tenn., his son,Jamie L. Baysore, age 5, of Clarksville, Tenn., his mother, Sandra Hackerberg of Winfield, Pa., and his father, Mr. Thomas Baysore of Milton, Pa.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->