Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Dives in Hell.

Dives in Hell.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY S. A. TIPPLE.


LUKEKVi. 23—31.

THE RICH MAN IS HOPELESSLY LOST,BUT HAS DESIRE FOR THOSE WHO STILL HAVE HOPE.
BY S. A. TIPPLE.


LUKEKVi. 23—31.

THE RICH MAN IS HOPELESSLY LOST,BUT HAS DESIRE FOR THOSE WHO STILL HAVE HOPE.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Oct 02, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/04/2014

pdf

text

original

 
DIVES I HELL.BY S. A. TIPPLE.LUKEKVi. 23—31."Anlit ca.me to pa.ss, that the beggar died, and was carried bythe angels into Abraham's bosom : the rich man also died, andwas buried ; and in hell he lift up his eyes, being in tor-ments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me,and send Lazarus, tha.t he may dip tha tip of his finger inwater, and cool my tongue ; for I am tormented in this flame.But Abraham said. Son, remember that thou in thy lifetimereceivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things ;but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And besideall this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed : so thatthey which would pass from hence to you cannot ; neither canthey pass to us, that would come from thence. Then he said,I pray thee therefore, Father, that thou wouldest send him tomy father's house : for I have five brethren ; that he maytestify unto them, lest they also come into , this place of torment. Abraham saith unto him. They have Moses and theprophets ; let them hear them. And he said. ay, FatherAbraham : but if one went unto them from the dead, they willrepent. And he said unto him. If they hear not Moses and theprophets, neither will they be persuaded, though one rose fromthe dead."S S It not, — let me first ask, — is it not satis-^ factory to be assured that such a man, as Dives came at length to be "intorments ? " — to read, after the description givenof him, that Christ, on following him fromhence into the other world, found him actuallystung and anguish-struck ; no longer the contented,
 
164 Dives in Hell.complacent, untroubled soul that he had been,sunk in the enjoyment of dressing and eating, of fine linen and sumptuous fare, with Lazarus thebeggar starving unheeded at his gate, but rousedinto exceeding discomposure and pain? What couldwe have desired more for him, than that he, inwhom neither the suffering of a fellow-creature, northe meanness and vileness of his own sensual,selfish life, awoke apparently the least rufflingpang, should, in process of time — if not on earth,yet on leaving the earth — ^be overtaken with pangs,sharp and severe ? Must we not feel that nothingbetter could have happened to him, that thechange was good and hopeful ? There are persons,you know, who vex and afflict us, just becausethey seem so untormentable, and whose easy-mindedness leads us to sigh for them. That theyare obstinately serene or jovial, that they are notcast down or sorrowful, — this is our burden withreference to them, and this our despair concerningthem. We say : " Oh that they were but capableof being a little disquieted and distressed!" Itwould rejoice us to learn that they had begun toworry or grieve ; we should welcome it .withthankfulness, as a sign of commencing health, as apromise of improvement.The school-boy, coming home for the holidays,term after term, always unsuccessful in compe-tition, and ignominiously outstripped and beaten bylads much younger than himself, yet always tran-quil, satisfied, smiling : what would not his fathergive to see him chafed and disturbed ; to see him,Dives in Hell. -. 165
 
instead of enjoying the vacation so thoroughly, — lift up his eyes in tormentThe novice, called to a position of great impor-tance and responsibility, installed in a post thateven superior ability and experience might well beawed by, and occupying it lightly, airily, confi-dendy, with scarce a quickening of the pulse, or theleast tremor of apprehension and anxiety : whowould not wish that it were otherwise ; that hischeek blanched, and his heart throbbed painfully ?And who would not think more highly of him, andanticipate more from him, if they did ?A man, living surrounded by scenes of humandisorder and wretchedness, and able the while togo on growing grapes, and cultivating rose-trees,and amusing himself with dainty dinners, or idledilettantism, without the slightest trouble in hisbreast : do we not esteem it his disgrace, and anevidence of defect of nature, that he can; andshould we not be gratified to hear that his lifewas spoilt for him with palpitations of trouble —trouble that would allow him no longer* toenjoy ?Have we not known men, whose shame anddegradation, whose peril and curse it was, thatthey were not in torments, concerning themselves,and who needed to be so, that they might beroused and saved, of whom nothing good couldbe made, and for whom nothing good could behoped, until they began to be ? Have we notseen men die, on whose behalf all that it was pos-sible to desire was, that they might lift up theireyes in torment; their condemnation, and their1 66 Dives in Hell.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->