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The Tech Talk 10.03.13

The Tech Talk 10.03.13

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The Tech Talk is a student-run newspaper published Thursdays of the regular school year, except in vacation and examination periods, by the journalism department of Louisiana Tech University. http://www.thetechtalk.org/
The Tech Talk is a student-run newspaper published Thursdays of the regular school year, except in vacation and examination periods, by the journalism department of Louisiana Tech University. http://www.thetechtalk.org/

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Published by: PhillipMichaelLeblanc on Oct 03, 2013
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PRSRT STDNON-PROFITORGANIZATIONUS POSTAGE
PAID
RUSTON, LAPERMIT NO 104RETURNSERVICEREQUESTED
THE STUDENT VOICE OF LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY
OCTOBER 3, 2013WWW.THETECHTALK.ORG
VOLUME 88 • ISSUE 4
CODY SEXTON
Staff Reporter
Ruston is seeing orange.But not because o thechanging leaves.The Townsend House hasits ninth annual pumpkin patch,which donates proceeds to thenonproft Domestic Abuse Re-sistance Team.DART is the Ruston-basedNorth Central Louisiana orga-nization which helps to protectvictims o domestic abuse.Terrie Queen Autrey, com-munity advocate or DART, saidthe proceeds help them coverexpenses not paid or by grantsthey receive.“The proceeds help some-one moving out o an abusivehome, urniture and clothing i they need it,” she said.Last year, DART was ableto help 726 people who werevictims o abuse with moneyreceived rom events like thepumpkin patch.The pumpkins are loadedonto an 18-wheeler on a Na-tive American reservation inNew Mexico and driven to theTownsend House where the
IAN EDWARDS
Staff Reporter
I one were to ask arandom person, one wouldprobably say there is noway anything powered bya lawnmower engine couldmake 10 laps around a six-mile track. Those peoplenever met the LouisianaTech Eco-Car Team.Courtney Jennings, asophomore chemical en-gineering major and agroup ofcer, explained thegroup’s purpose.“We build cars to com-pete in the Shell Eco-Marathon,” Jennings said.“The winners are judged bywhich car gets the best gasmileage.”According to Dennis Du-rene, a junior industrial en-gineering major and also agroup leader, the cars mustmeet certain criteria.“During the 10 laps, thecars must make three stopsto simulate city trafc,” Du-rene said. “In addition, thecars must have workinglights, mirrors and signals.They also cannot drop be-low an average o 15 milesper hour. The drivers mustweigh 152 pounds or under,as well.”Not only has the Eco-Carteam met these conditions;they have gone above and beyond.“We currently hold theNorth American, SouthAmerican and Asian re-cords or best gas mileagein the urban diesel categoryor the second year run-ning,” Jennings said. “Our‘Hot Rod,’ as we call it, gotfrst place with 488.7 miles
IAN EDWARDS
Staff Reporter
The Student Center washome to many studentsdressed in business attirelast Thursday. Their goal: toprove why they are the bestchoices to fll the positionso their dreams.From 10a.m. to 3p.m., morethan 100companiesand cor-porationswere in at-tendanceto considerhiring ma-jors o allcatego-ries to jointheir ranks.There was something oreveryone.Lane Johnson, assistantstate conservation engi-neer, explained his compa-ny and its purpose.“We are the NationalResources ConservationService,” Johnson said.“We work under the De-partment o Agriculture.”Johnson said that engi-neers were in high demand.“We are seeking engi-neers or our Pathway Pro-gram,” he said. “With thisprogram, students internwith us or two years whileboth parties decide i weare a good ft or each other.I they decide on us, thanksto the program, we are ableto bypass most o the job
CODY SEXTON
Staff Reporter
As Louisiana Tech’sschool year begins, so doesthe theater department’spreparation to bring enter-tainment to the Tech andRuston community.The department worksthrough the student-runStone Theatre and the Loui-siana Tech Concert Associ-ation to host concerts, playsand other perormances.Cherrie Sciro, directoro theater, said the depart-ment is working on bringingsomething new this year.“We want to allow theRuston community andTech community to be ableto attend cultural events,”said Sciro.This year students canlook orward to a little bito everything rom the per-ormances hosted by theLTCA, said Sciro.Kicking othe LTCA’sseason Oct. 15 is the NelsonRiddle Orchestra.Considered the “World’sMost Recorded Orchestra,”they have worked with Sina-tra, Judy Garland, BarbraStreisand and many others.The critically acclaimedsinger/songwriter KarlaBono will be the next toperorm, Jan. 30.Bono, who has writ-ten songs or Bonnie Raittand Wynonna Judd, hasperormed sold-out showsworldwide.In honor o Black Histo-ry Month, the Walnut StreetTheater group will perormthe Pulitzer-Prize winninghit, “Driving Miss Daisy”Feb. 15.The LTCA’s fnal showwill be a perormanceApril 10rom the MargaretJenkins Dance Company.They will perorm their newshow, “Times Bones,” whichdraws inspiration rom theEgyptian myth o “the scat-tered limbs o Osiris.”Cheyenne Minish, anaviation management soph-omore, said she is lookingorward to this year’s peror-mances.“I’m excited about thedance company,” Minishsaid. “ ‘Driving Miss Daisy’is a close second.”Minish is one o thestudent workers who help
To fndout moreabout utureCareer Days,contact the CareerCenter at
318-257-4336
or KeenyHall, Room337.
>
see
TECH
page 6
Tech’s eco-car team gears up
Companiesflock toCareer Day
Theaterdepartmentto meetall needs
 
The Townsend Houseraises money for DART
Photos by Derek J. Amaya
Above and below: The pumpkins were unloaded and placed all throughout the Townsend House property.
Photos by Devin Dronett
Courtney Jennings works on one o the team’s eco cars.
>
see
COMPANIES
page 2
>
see
THEATER
page 6
>
see
PUMPKINS
page 2
 
for a cause
MUSIC REVIEW 
KINGS
LEON
OF
The Kings return to form with their sixth studio release, ‘Mechanical Bull’ 
PAGE 5
TalkTech
T
he
 
ALIVE
and
KICKING
Men’s Futbol Club set to strike it big for Tech students 
PAGE 2
 
2
The Tech Talk
October 3, 2013
Campus
SGA changeshomecoming parade
The Student Govern-ment Association will hostthe annual HomecomingParade at 10:30 a.m. Oct. 19on Tech’s campus.The parade is a part o Homecoming Week, inwhich organizations createtheir own oat, throw beads,candy, etc. to promote theirorganization.In the past, the paradehas only been open to Techorganizations participatingin Homecoming Week.This year, the SGA isasking local businesses toparticipate in order to getthe community and localalumni more involved.For more inormationcontact Allison East, presi-dent o the SGA, at 318-257-4565 or ace007@lat-ech.edu.
Engineers to hostHalloween 5k
Engineers Without Bor-ders will host a Running ForWater 5K at 9 a.m. Oct. 26at Lincoln Parish Park.Pre-registration is $25and can be done throughtheir website www.lat-echewb.org, or participantscan pick up a registrationpacket outside studentsuccess specialist, AllieDeLeo,’s ofce, Bogard Hall210.Race day registration is$30 and will take place at 8a.m. at Lincoln Parish Park.Registration includes ad-mission to the race, a T-shirtand rereshments.Proceeds will go to help bring resh water to a com-munity in the Philippines.The race is a Halloweenedition, so costumes are en-couraged.
Career Center to holdLinkedIn seminar
From 1-2 p.m. Oct. 31on the third oor o KeenyHall, the Career Center willhost their LinkedIn seminar.This event will help stu-dents learn to navigateLinkedIn.It will also teach themhow to eectively use thesite to network and presentthemselves proessionallyonline.This seminar is ree andopen to any interested Techstudents.For more inormationcontact Ashley Allen, ca-reer services coordinator,at 318-257-4336 or aallen@latech.edu.
NEWS
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Keeny HallWyly Tower
CampusWashateria
 Just East of Tech Campus
Next to University Apartments behind Wesley Foundation 
• Open 24 hours / 7 days a week • Cleanest in town• New machines• Air Conditioned
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SERVING TECH STUDENTS SINCE 1965 YOUR PARENTS WASHED WITH US
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>
COMPANIES
from pg. 1
search process that comes with any ederalob.”The trend o looking or engineers con-tinued. Miranda Kovach, products engineeror Intralox, was one o many recruitersseeking engineers.“Intralox makes modular plastic beltsthat can be used or a variety o industrialapplications,” she said. “We are hiring me-chanical engineers or both internships andull-time positions.”O course, the day was not just about en-gineers. Brian King, area manager or Buck-le, detailed what his company was lookingor.“We are looking mainly or students whoare interested in paid internships in themanagement feld,” King said. “They willdevelop the skills to help them go out andmanage one o our stores.”King said that the scouting process had been very productive.“We’ve almost completely flled up ourscheduled interview slots,” he said. “Hope-ully, we will be able to hire many studentsrom Tech.”Some companies, like Saks Incorporat-ed, have begun looking or new majors.“We are looking or anything I.T. related,”said Chris Cole, manager o I.T. with SaksIncorporated. “We have been looking or alot o computer science majors, but one weare really interested in is cyber security.”For more inormation on Career Day,or to learn the location o the next event,contact the Career Center by email at ca-reercenter@latech.edu, by phone at 318-257-4336 or visit their ofce in Keeny Hall,Room 337.“We knew Tech had some o the beststudents around,” Johnson said. “And wewere right.”
Email comments to ije001@latech.edu.
>
PUMPKINS
from pg. 1
truck is unloaded by pass-ing each pumpkin down anassembly line o volunteers.Many o the volunteerswho show up to unload thethousands o pumpkins areLouisiana Tech students.Tech’s Baptist CollegiateMinistries is one o the or-ganizations with volunteers.Kathy Nelson, assistantdirector or the BCM, saidshe is a riend o Autry’s andreerred to her as a “tirelessworker” or DART’s cause.“She asked i we had stu-dents wanting to help andwe like to stay community-minded and do what wecan,” Nelson said.Kim Birch, owner o the Townsend House, alsoserves on the board orDART and said when shefrst bought the house sheenvisioned pumpkins allaround it.“It speaks volumes o what a success we haveeach year with the pumpkinpatch to have held it or nine years,” she said.Last year, Birch said dueto so many volunteers theyunloaded the truck in a re-cord hour and a hal whichwas hal the time it usuallytook them.“It touches me to look out on the day we unloadand see all the volunteerswe have,” she said. “It makesme teary-eyed.”Birch said the pumpkinsserve as a great attractionor people who like to takepictures with them and doesnot mind as long as they ei-ther buy one or make a do-nation to DART.The pumpkins’ pricesvary with their size.
JOHN SADLER
Staff Reporter
For years, Tech menwho hoped to play soccerhave had to settle for play-ing on an intramural team.But now, the LouisianaTech Futbol Club is offer-ing a more professional andcompetitive environmentfor aspiring players.
“We have been workingon this or two years, andwe’ve fnally got it,” saidBrian Williamson, a juniorenvironmental sciencemajor.The group was the brainchild o Williamson,who said he had growntired o the soccer optionsor men on Tech’s campus.“The intramurals aren’tas competitive as I want,”he said. “So I decided totry and start my own club.”Tanner White, a sopho-more chemical engineer-ing major, said both he andthe other members appre-ciate the impact William-son had on the club.“It i wasn’t or him wewouldn’t have it becausehe’s the one who put inthe eort to make it a clubsport,” White said.
White, who plays de-fensive back, said the rea-son there was not a men’ssoccer club before is thatsoccer just is not big in theSouth.
“It’s dierent than oot- ball or basketball,” Whitesaid. “I think a lot o peo-ple just don’t think aboutit.”John Weinell said heagrees with White.“I eel like ootballand basketball have reignhere,” Weinell, a juniormathematics major, said.“Soccer is a huge deal ev-erywhere but here.”
Despite the seeming un-popularity of soccer, Whiteand Weinell both have apositive opinion on the fu-ture of the sport.
“I think its popularity isincreasing, though,” Whitesaid. “People have startedasking me or pick-upgames.”Weinell said he hopesthe club will impact Techenough to eventually bepicked up as a varsitysport.“Soccer’s popularity isdefnitely on the rise,” hesaid. “I hope Tech picks upthe club, but I know thatkind o stu doesn’t hap-pen quickly. Maybe theywill do it in the next 10 years or so.”Williamson said hehopes people’s preconcep-tions o the game will notstop Tech or audiencesrom taking it seriously.“I think people view itas inherently oreign,” hesaid. “Naming it the utbolclub probably didn’t helpmuch.”Williamson said theteam needs supports athome and away.“I want to encourage allstudents to come supportus at our games,” he said.“We’ve got concessionsand undraisers, so comehelp make this team big.”
Email comments to  jts040@latech.edu.
Futbol club on the rise
Photo by Derek J. Amaya
Scott Pumphrey, a senior professional aviation major andmember of the futbol team, works on his kicks at practice.
Small pumpkins can be$.50 and some can reach upto $50.“Our pumpkins are a better quality and go to anexcellent cause to support,”she said.
Email comments to cls068@latech.edu.
 
October 3, 2013
The Tech Talk
3
World Nation
 WORLDNEWS
Israel against Iran’snuclear weapons
UNITED NATIONS (AP)Israeli Prime MinisterBenjamin Netanyahu playedthe spoiler Tuesday to anyeasing o Iran’s relationswith the West, telling worldleaders his country will dowhatever it takes to preventTehran rom developing nu-clear weapons, even i it hasto stand alone.
Torture continuesin Libyan jails
UNITED NATIONS (AP)— Torture is widespread inLibyan jails run by militiasthat toppled MoammarGadha’s regime in 2011,according to a United Na-tions report released Tues-day.U.N. investigators, whohad periodic access to vari-ous detention centers, saidthere is evidence that 27people have been torturedto death in the prisons, 11o them this year, accordingto a report by the U.N. HighCommissioner or HumanRights and the U.N. SupportMission in Libya.
Number o elderlycauses concern
(AP) — The world isaging so ast that mostcountries are not preparedto support their swellingnumbers o elderly people,according to a global studybeing issued Tuesday by theUnited Nations and an elderrights group.
BRF takes overLSU hospitals
BATON ROUGE (AP) — A nonprot research ounda-tion has taken over manage-ment o the LSU hospitals inShreveport and Monroe.The Biomedical ResearchFoundation o NorthwestLouisiana, or BRF, began itsmanagement o the hospi-tals Tuesday, under a priva-tization deal pushed by Gov.Bobby Jindal. 
Man arrested orcruely to grandma
ARNAUDVILLE (AP)—St. Landry sheri’s depu-ties say an Arnaudville mandrugged his 78-year-oldgrandmother so he andhis riends could make andsmoke crystal meth in theattic o the woman’s homewhile she slept.Deputies say 35-year-oldTodd Richard also is accusedo stealing more than $7,000his grandmother gave him topay her monthly bills.Detectives say she oundout about the thet ater Ar-naudville disconnected thewater rom the home sheshared with the suspect.It is unclear whetherRichard has an attorney.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hailing it as a “historicday,” President Barack Obama pressed orwardhis fagship health care pro-gram Tuesday, inauguratingnew insurance exchangesto expand access or thosewithout coverage despitethe shutdown taking holdacross much o the govern-ment.Obama said the oppor-tunity to access aordableinsurance is lie-changingor those who could not doso beore the launch o theexchanges, now open orenrollment or six monthsstarting Tuesday. As a signo how eager Americanswere to get started, Obamasaid more than 1 millionpeople had visited thewebsite beore 7 a.m. EST — exceeding expectationsand, in some cases, slow-ing down the computersystems.“This is lie-or-deathstu,” Obama said in theWhite House Rose Garden,fanked by Americans whoplan to enroll through theexchanges. He said tens o thousands o Americansdie each year or lack o health insurance, and oth-ers go bankrupt. “Today we begin to ree millions o ourellow Americans rom thatear.”Obama urged Ameri-cans to call in or go online,promoting an online systemthat he said will oer morechoices, more competi-tion and lower prices. Forthat to work, the Obamaadministration needs tenso millions o Americans — mostly younger, healthypeople — to sign up o oset the costs o patientswhose health care costsmore.Obama acknowledgedthere would be glitches inrolling out the program — there have been plenty al-ready — but said that’s nor-mal and that the problemswill be xed. The Obamaadministration hopes tosign up 7 million peopleduring the rst year.Obama’s appearancekicked o a major cam-paign by his administrationand its allies to enroll asmany Americans as possi- ble through the exchanges,a centerpiece o Obama’shealth care law.But any sense o estiv-ity surrounding the open-ing o the exchanges wasquickly eclipsed by the actthat throughout Washing-ton and across the coun-try, much o the ederalgovernment was shuttered.Congress, gridlocked overwhether to dismantle thelaw, missed the midnightdeadline to keep undingthe government.That meant that hun-dreds o thousands o ederal workers were senthome — including manyo Obama’s own aides.The White House cut itssta by three-quarters asthe rst partial shutdown inalmost two decades began.
Obama hails Affordable Care
AP Photo
President Obama addresses the nation concerning the Aordable Care Act Tuesday.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Francis says hedoesn’t want a “Vatican-centric” church concernedabout itsel but a mission-ary church that reaches outto the poor, the young, theelderly and even to non- believers. That’s the visionhe laid out as he openeda landmark meeting Tues-day on reorming the2,000-year-old institution.Francis convened the in-augural meeting o his eightcardinal advisers or threedays o brainstorming onrevamping the antiquatedVatican bureaucracy andother reorms. The moveullls a key mandate o thecardinals who elected him:They wanted a pope whowould involve local churchleaders in helping make de-cisions about the 1.2-billionstrong church.The closed-door meet-ing got underway againstthe backdrop o one o themost tangible signs thatchange is already aoot:The secretive Vatican bank,under investigation or al-leged money-laundering by Italian prosecutors, re-leased its rst-ever annualreport Tuesday, the lateststep toward nancial trans-parency championed byFrancis and his predeces-sor Benedict XVI.Net earnings at the bank, known as the Insti-tute or Religious Works,rose more than our-old to86.6 million euros ($116.95million) in 2012, the reportsaid. More than 50 millioneuros o that was given tothe pope or his charitableworks.Francis has put the Vati-can bank on notice, orm-ing a commission o inqui-ry to look into its activitiesamid accusations by Italianprosecutors that its clientsmay have used its lax con-trols to launder money. The bank’s two top managershave already resigned anda Vatican monsignor has been arrested ater tryingto smuggle 20 million eurosinto Italy rom Switzerlandwithout declaring it at cus-toms.
Pope Francis ready to reform Church
AP Photo
Pope Francis began his parallel cabinet meeting on Tues-day or frst-round talks o reorming the Catholic church.
US governmentshutdown closesparks, monuments
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Visitors arrived tond “CLOSED” signs atthe Statue o Liberty, theSmithsonian and otherparks and historic sitesacross the country. Call-ers looking or help romthe government reachedonly voicemail. And ed-eral employees were let towonder when they wouldreturn to work.The rst governmentshutdown in 17 years took hold Tuesday in ways largeand small.About 800,000 ed-eral employees were senthome — a number greaterthan the combined U.S.workorces o Target,General Motors, Exxonand Google.“Ater next week, i we’re not working, I’mgoing to have to nd a job,” said Robert Turner,a building mechanic at theSmithsonian’s AmericanHistory museum in the na-tion’s capital. Turner wascalled in or hal the day.The eects played outin a variety o ways, romscaled-back operations atederal prosecutors’ oc-es and the FBI to revokedpermits or dozens o weddings at historic sitesin Washington.Campers and hikersat the Grand Canyon, Yo-semite, Yellowstone andother national parks weregiven two days to pack up and leave, and newvisitors were being turnedaway. St. Louis’ landmark 630-oot-high GatewayArch was o-limits as well.

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