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2014 10 Ideas Action Plan Guide (1)

2014 10 Ideas Action Plan Guide (1)

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Okay, you’re writing an amazing policy that is going to change the face of [insert your problem here], your work is done right? Wrong. Good policy impacts communities when it plays out in city departments, through non-governmental institutions, and in the streets. The policy process is complex, and good ideas are only great when muscle and people get behind them. The strategy – or plan – that’s used to bring about a solution is just as important as the idea itself.
Okay, you’re writing an amazing policy that is going to change the face of [insert your problem here], your work is done right? Wrong. Good policy impacts communities when it plays out in city departments, through non-governmental institutions, and in the streets. The policy process is complex, and good ideas are only great when muscle and people get behind them. The strategy – or plan – that’s used to bring about a solution is just as important as the idea itself.

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Published by: Roosevelt Campus Network on Oct 03, 2013
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2014 10 IdeasACTION PLAN WRITING GUIDE
Action Plan Writing Guide: Just Add Elbow Grease!
Okay, you’re writing an amazing policy that is going to change the face of [insert yourproblem here], your work is done right? Wrong. Good policy impacts communities when itplays out in city departments, through non-governmental institutions, and in the streets. Thepolicy process is complex, and good ideas are only great when muscle and people get behindthem. The strategy – or plan – that’s used to bring about a solution is just as important as theidea itself.So, the question everyone has after reading a great policy piece is: what’s next? How can youtake your idea and make it a reality? The answer is what this guide has been designed to helpyou write: your action plan.Your action plan should be a step-by-step guide for the successful implementation of yourpolicy. This plan should be actionable by anyone, even those who are not too familiar with thecommunity or issue you are trying to address. As such, your plan should answer the followingquestions: What, Why, Where, Who, When, and How?Hint: A good action plan is specific, thought out, strategic, and feasible. Use thesecharacteristics to guide how you build your plan.
What? (30 words)
This should just be a brief summary of your policy (think elevator pitch!).
Why? (50 words)
The language for this section will primarily come from your policy memo. Here we want ashort explanation of why
this 
policy needs to be implemented. Why is this an issue in the firstplace? What makes this policy different than other proposals that are aimed to tackle thesame issue?
Where? (50-75 words)
 This should include some background about the community in which you will be implementingyour policy. Why is your policy necessary in this community in particular? What is specialabout this space that will allow your policy to be successfully implemented? What would yourreader need to know about the community to be successful in implementing your policy? Whydid this community stand out to you?
Who? (150-250 words)
This section can be a list of people and organizations that you have identified as keystakeholders. This list should include your allies, partner organizations, community leadersthat could help your cause, as well as potential opponents. The list should include a short
 
2014 10 IdeasACTION PLAN WRITING GUIDE
description of why each person is important for your policy to be implemented. You shouldalso include information on how each contact relates to the policy itself: have you reached outto them before? Are they close to the stakeholders?Ex:
 
The Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network (Contact Lydia Bowers): TheRoosevelt Institute is a network of engaged millennials devoted to progressivepolicy change. Lydia would be a great person to go to if one needs help writingan action plan or has questions about the 10 Ideas Process.
How? (200-300 words)
This section should be a combination of strategies, tactics, and best practices (a lot of which isfocused on how you’re engaging those stakeholders you identified). It should answer anyremaining questions about how to implement your policy. This should be written in a similarway to the ‘Who?’ section, with bullets followed by short explanations. This section will varydepending on the type of policy you wrote and the levers that you hope to use to affectchange. A policy focused on non-profits will vary in the ‘how’ from one focusing on pressuringstate legislators to pass a law, and should be grounded in the desired outcome. Strategiesmight include building a network of volunteers to make phone calls, while a tactic mightinclude writing a letter to the editor of a local newspaper to increase awareness about yourwork. This section should also detail the kind of infrastructure one might need, such as anoffice, or the kind of fundraising that would be necessary to get the policy off the ground.Ex:
 
A tactic for making sure that your policy and action plans are well written andcomplete is sharing it among your chapter members and professors. They willbe perfect avenues for seeing what questions/concerns someone who isn’tfamiliar with your policy would have before implementation.
 
A strategy for writing this guide is to use the examples to both illustrate whatthe action plan should look like, and also include more relevant information.
 
In order for the action plan to be effective, the how should be a majorcomponent and have some of the most information about the path toimplementation.
When? (150-300 words)
This section should include a timeline of what to do from Day 1 to the Day (insert last day ofimplementation here). The timeline should include things like: which organizations/individualsshould the implementer reach out to first? Second? Third? What are the milestones that willbe necessary to implement your policy? Is there a length of time or period of time that shouldbe expected for the policy?Ex.1.
 
In the next week, begin to write out a first draft of your plan2.
 
Edit and show it to some other chapter members or classmates so you canmake your action plan the best it can be.

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