Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Gombrich, Moment and Movement in Art.pdf

Gombrich, Moment and Movement in Art.pdf

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4|Likes:
Published by nicolajvandermeulen

More info:

Published by: nicolajvandermeulen on Oct 04, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/04/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Moment and Movement in ArtAuthor(s): E. H. GombrichSource:
Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes,
Vol. 27 (1964), pp. 293-306Published by: The Warburg InstituteStable URL:
Accessed: 07/03/2010 08:43
Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available athttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unlessyou have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and youmay use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.Please contact the publisher regarding any further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained athttp://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=warburg.Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printedpage of such transmission.JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
The Warburg Institute
is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to
 Journal of theWarburg and Courtauld Institutes.
http://www.jstor.org
 
ByE. H.Gombrich
Whiletheproblemof spaceand itsrepresentationn art hasoccupiedtheattentionof arthistorians o analmostexaggerateddegree, thecorre-spondingproblem of timeand therepresentationofmovementhasbeenstrangelyneglected.There are ofcoursesomerelevantobservationscatteredthroughollttheliterature,lbut nosystematictreatment hasever been at-tempted.It isnot thepurposeof thepresentpapertosupply thiswant:onlytoindicate how thisneglect mayhave arisen andwherewemayhave torevise ourpreconceptionsf weare toapproachthe problemafresh. For itmay be arguedthat itwas thewayinwhich theproblemof thepassageoftime in paintingwastraditionallyposed thatdoomed theanswersorelativesterility.This traditionreachesbackat least to theearlyeighteenthcentury,moreprecisely o LordShaftesbury'slassicormlllation n theCharacteristics.2ChapterIof Anotion f theHistoricalraught, r flablaturef therudgmentfHerculespenswith thestatement hat'thisFable orHistorymaybe variouslyrepresented,ccordingo theOrderof Time'Either in theinstant when thetwoGoddesses
VIRTUE
and
PLEASURE)
accost
HERCULES;
Or whenthey areenter'd on theirDispute; OrwhentheirDisputeisalreadyfaradvanc'd,and
VIRTUE
seems to gainherCause.In thefirst nstanceHercllleswouldhave to beshownsurprised ttheappear-ance ofthe twoGoddesses; n thesecondhe wouldhave to beshown nterestedand indoubt,and inthe thirdwewouldwitnesshow he'agonizes,andwithallhis Strengthof Reasonendeavoursoovercomehimself'. It isthisAristo-telianturning-point hat isrecommended othepainter,thoughShaftesburyalsodiscusses hefourthpossibilityofrepresenting theDate or Period .. .whenHerculessintirely wonbyVirtue'.Herejects t on thegrounds ofdramaticinefficacyand fortheadditionalreasonthatin suchapicture
'PLEASURE. . .
mustnecessarilyappeardispleas'd,or outof humour: aCir-cumstancewhichwoll'dnoway suteherCharacter.''Tisevident, that everyMasternPainting,whenhe hasmadechoiceof thedeterminateDate or Pointof Time,accordingohich hewou'drepresenthisHistory, isafterwardsdebar'd thetaking advantagefromanyotherActionthan whatisimmediatelypresent,andbelonging othatsingleInstanthedescribes.For ifhepasses hepresentonly foramoment,hemay as well passit for manyyears.Andby thisreckoninghemaywithas good rightrepeat thesame Figureseveral times over .. .
1 Cf. E.Panofsky'seviewof HannsKauS-hunlegende',
OudHolland,
7I,I956;
R.Arn-mann,
AlbrechtDurer'srythmischeSunst
in heim,
Art andVisualPerception,
956,
chapter
jrahrbuchurSunstwissenschaft,
926.
M. J.
VIII,
and my
Art and
mUsiOn,I960,
indexs.v.Friedlaender,
VonSunst undSennerschaft,Ox-
'movement'.fordand Zurich,
I946, pp. 60-66;
H. A.
2
Anthonyl Earl ofShaftesbury,
Charac-
Groenewegen-Frankfort,
ArrestandMovement,teristicksofMen,Manners,Opinions,7Cimes,
I95I;
H.van de Waal,
Traditieenbezielung,
I7I4.
For thecommission nd itsresult seeRotterdam,
I946
and 'DeStaalmeesters nF.Haskell,
PatronsandPainters,
963, p.I98.
293
MOMENTANDMOVEMENTINART
 
294E.H.GOMBRICH
Thereremainsnootherway bywhichwecanpossiblygiveahintofanythingfuture,orcall tomindanythingpast,thanby settinginviewsuchPassagesrEventsashaveactuallysubsisted,r accordingoNaturemightwellsubsist,or happentogethernoneandheamenstant.Thisabsolutenecessity,however,need notpreventhepainterromrepre-sentingmovementor changesuchas theturning-pointfthedramaShaftes-buryhadrecommendedor thechoiceofHercllles.For'theArtisthaspowertoleavestillinhisSubjecttheTractsorFootstepsofits Predecessor.. asforinstance,whentheplainTracksofTearsnewfallen.. .remainstillinaPersonnewlytransportedwithJoy....By thesamemeans,whichareem-ploy'dtocall tomindthePast,wemayanticipateheFuture..' Inour case,forinstance,he artistcouldshowHerculesndoubtandyetindicatethathisdecisionwastobeinfavourofVirtue:ThisTransition,whichseemsat firstsomysteriousPerformance,willbeeasilycomprehended,f oneconsiders,ThattheBody,whichmovesmuchslowerthantheMind,iseasilyout-strip'dby thislatter;andthattheMindonasuddenturningitselfsomenewway,thenearersituatedandmoresprightlypartsof theBody(suchastheEyesandMusclesabouttheMouthandForehead)takingthealarm,andmovingin aninstant,mayleavetheheavierandmoredistantpartstoadjustthemselves,andchangetheirAttitudesomemomentsafter.ThisdifferentOperationmaybedistinguish'dythenamesofAnticipationnd Repeal.Shaftesburydmitsthatthisrigoroustandardofinstantaneousctionisoftensinnedagainst.Hereferswithamusementandcontemptto theusualrepresentationsfDianaandActaeon,nwhichthe goddesss seenthrowingwateratActaeonwhosehornsare alreadygrowingalthoughheisnotyetwet.It wasShaftesbury'sormulation,odoubt,whichnfluencedJamesHarrisinhisDiscoursenMusic,PaintingndPoetry,3herethedistinctions firstmadewithalldesirableclaritybetweenthevariousmediaofart,musicbeingcon-cernedwithmotionandsound,paintingwithshapesandcolours.Everypictureisthus 'ofnecessityapunctumemporisr instant'.ButthoughHarriscallsa painting'butaPointorInstant',headdsthat'ina StorywellknowntheSpectator'sMemorywillsupplythepreviousandthe subsequent..[This]cannotbe donewheresuchKnowledgeswanting'.Infacthewonderswhetheranyhistoricalncidentna paintingwouldbeintelligiblesupposinghistoryohavebeensilentandtohavegivenno additionalnformation'.Alltheseideasweretakenup byLessingandwovenintothefabricof hisLaocoon,hichsystematicallydistinguishesetweentheartsoftimeandtheartsof space.'Paintingcan.. .onlyrepresenta singlemomentofan actionandmustthereforeelectthemostpregnantmomentwhichbestallowsus toinferwhathasgonebeforeandwhatfollows.'4Lessing,asI havetriedtoargueelsewhere,5didnotwritetheLaocoonforthesakeof thiswell-estab-
3JamesHarris,
fhreefreatises,
744.
Mind),
ProceedingsftheBritishAcademy,
liii,
4
Loc.cit.,
XVI.I957.5
Cf.my 'Lessing'(LectureonaMaster

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->