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i Know Whom i Have Believed.

i Know Whom i Have Believed.

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Published by glennpease
BY REV. W. H. BROOK FIELD

CHAPLAIN IN ORDINARY TO THE QUEEN


I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He is
able to keep that which I have conmiitted unto Him against that
day.— 2 Timothy i. 12.
BY REV. W. H. BROOK FIELD

CHAPLAIN IN ORDINARY TO THE QUEEN


I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He is
able to keep that which I have conmiitted unto Him against that
day.— 2 Timothy i. 12.

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Published by: glennpease on Oct 08, 2013
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I KOW WHOM I HAVE BELIEVED.BY REV. W. H. BROOK FIELDCHAPLAI I ORDIARY TO THE QUEEI know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He isable to keep that which I have conmiitted unto Him against thatday.— 2 Timothy i. 12.St. Paul is addressing in terms of great cordiality andaffection the chief Pastor of the Church of Ephesus, ue.St. Timothy ; a person considerably younger than him-self, and to whom it is evident that he was deeplyattached, both as a fellow labourer in the interestsof Christianity and as a personal friend. From thisfriend he foresaw that he must shortly be separated bya violent death, as he was already separated by thedistance between Rome and Ephesus. There is some-thing very affecting in the tenderness, when it doesshow itself, of the more rugged and untender kind of men. In persons of a more impressionable class — inthose of excitable, ostentatious, or emotional and un-reserved temperament, tears and demonstrative phrasescome cheaply, and, like other things that are plentifuland easy to procure, they don't count for much. Butin persons, and particularly in men, of more reservedand more self-controlled character, the mist that occasion*ally but rarely gathers in the eye, scarcely enough tocondense into a tear, this we must all have sometimes-/ KOW WHOM I HAVE BELIEVED. 37felt to be touching — almost tragic when it comes. Suchis the tenderness which occasionally betrays itself in thenature of St. Paul. Beneath an exterior partaking pro-bably somewhat of that austerity, that jealousy of inter-
 
ference, that impatience of counteraction, which oftencharacterise energetic natures, there lay the softest andmost susceptible instincts. Such tender and affectionateimpulses does he exhibit in this letter addressed to St.Timothy, his own disciple and convert, and obviously afriend very fondly cherished. They were united in thesame faith ; they were engaged in the same calling, thepro-mulgation, namely, of the Gospel ; and exposed (thoughat a great distance from each other) to the same dangers.And looking at the difference of their ages and thesimilarity of the perils they were braving, and in whichthey encouraged, assisted, and sustained each other, maywe not imagine them as a weather-beaten fisherman andhis son, out in a frail boat together upon a stormy sea,that threatened every moment to engulf them ; bothfather and son each advising, suggesting, helping, cheer-ing the other, according to the various exigencies of themoment, and every now and then pointing, not withouta mutual smile of reassurance, to the steady flame of thebeacon burning in the distance to which they are steer-ing } I said sailing together. But they were together onlyin the spirit. Personally they were separated by the dis-tance between Rome and Ephesus. St. Paul was at Rome,a prisoner in the hands of that ero whose name is a pro-verb of sin and cruelty, and under whom he was shortlyafterwards beheaded. St. Timothy was at Ephesus, acity in such a state of hostility to the Christian Church38 / KOW WHOM I HAVE BEUEVED.that was growing up in it, that the expression ' wildbeasts of Ephesus * may probably have indicated religiousantipathies, and outrages of bigotry and persecution farmore implacable and merciless than the famished tigersof the amphitheatre. There seemed to be no probabilitythat the two friends would ever meet again. The greatApostle writes (alluding to his certain and not distantexecution), ' The time of my departure is at hand ; I am
 
ready to be offered.' And it is evident that this separa-tion was keenly felt by that manly, rugged, but stilltender-hearted character. * Without ceasing I have re-membrance of thee in my prayers, night and day;greatly desiring to see thee, being mindful of thy tears ' — tears, that is, on the occasion of their last parting. Andall this he felt the more keenly because of the dangers,the isolation, the hostility, by which he was himself surrounded. Most people are sufficiently familiar withchemical experiments to know that there are some sortsof gas, noxious, offensive, and intolerable in themselves,but in which if a lighted taper be plunged it bums ahundredfold more luminously than in the ordinaryatmosphere. And there are moral predicaments, dis-tressing in themselves, but in which your affectionstowards those on whom you can rely, bum more brightlythan amidst the most exhilarating circumstances. everdo friends seem so valuable as amidst depression anddistress. St. Paul felt it a great comfort even to re-member his absent friend. * I thank God,' he says, ' thatI have remembrance of thee.* The remembrance of himwas so delightful to his heart that he thanked God forit as for any other blessing. And how manly all the/ KOW WHOM I HAVE BELIEVED, 39time is this pathetic tenderness. How unlike the tink-ling notes of mere sentiment. In what cheering, invigo-rating language does he address the friend that he isyearning after. * God hath not given us the spirit of fear ; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind. Benot thou therefore ashamed of the testimony of our Lord,nor of me His prisoner ; but be thou partaker of the afflic-tions of the Gospel; according to the power of God, whohath saved us ' (verse 7). In their common danger andtheir common interest, as they brave the turbulent seatogether, through the dim and stormy distance Paulpoints out to him the light of immortality, glowing like a

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