Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Online Teaching Communities from Preservice to Proficiency

Online Teaching Communities from Preservice to Proficiency

Ratings:

5.0

(2)
|Views: 173 |Likes:
Published by Claire Fontaine
In this paper I explore how online com­mu­ni­ties of prac­tice can help ease the tran­si­tion from pre­ser­vice to inser­vice teach­ing by offer­ing sup­port on an as-needed basis as a sup­ple­ment to tra­di­tional face-to-face men­tor­ing, what I refer to as “blended men­tor­ing.” This sort of on-demand sup­port is sorely missed by new teach­ers. Online teach­ing com­mu­ni­ties can also help improve reten­tion rates of new teach­ers in because par­tic­i­pa­tion in a the vibrant online com­mu­nity cre­ates a sense of col­le­gial­ity often miss­ing from teach­ers’ phys­i­cal work envi­ron­ments. Indeed, nearly fifty per­cent of new teach­ers quit within the first five years, typ­i­cally cit­ing insuf­fi­cient sup­port and the indi­vid­u­al­is­tic and iso­lat­ing work cul­ture as the pri­mary com­plaints. The suc­cess of online community-building ini­tia­tives, how­ever, will depend on uni­ver­si­ties accept­ing joint respon­si­bil­ity, along with local school dis­tricts, for pro­vid­ing high qual­ity and ongo­ing pro­fes­sional devel­op­ment oppor­tu­ni­ties to the teach­ers who pass through their sys­tem. This analy­sis is framed by the notion of teach­ing as a clin­i­cal prac­tice pro­fes­sion — much like med­i­cine — which implies that real learn­ing occurs at the inter­sec­tion of aca­d­e­mic knowl­edge and applied prac­tice.
In this paper I explore how online com­mu­ni­ties of prac­tice can help ease the tran­si­tion from pre­ser­vice to inser­vice teach­ing by offer­ing sup­port on an as-needed basis as a sup­ple­ment to tra­di­tional face-to-face men­tor­ing, what I refer to as “blended men­tor­ing.” This sort of on-demand sup­port is sorely missed by new teach­ers. Online teach­ing com­mu­ni­ties can also help improve reten­tion rates of new teach­ers in because par­tic­i­pa­tion in a the vibrant online com­mu­nity cre­ates a sense of col­le­gial­ity often miss­ing from teach­ers’ phys­i­cal work envi­ron­ments. Indeed, nearly fifty per­cent of new teach­ers quit within the first five years, typ­i­cally cit­ing insuf­fi­cient sup­port and the indi­vid­u­al­is­tic and iso­lat­ing work cul­ture as the pri­mary com­plaints. The suc­cess of online community-building ini­tia­tives, how­ever, will depend on uni­ver­si­ties accept­ing joint respon­si­bil­ity, along with local school dis­tricts, for pro­vid­ing high qual­ity and ongo­ing pro­fes­sional devel­op­ment oppor­tu­ni­ties to the teach­ers who pass through their sys­tem. This analy­sis is framed by the notion of teach­ing as a clin­i­cal prac­tice pro­fes­sion — much like med­i­cine — which implies that real learn­ing occurs at the inter­sec­tion of aca­d­e­mic knowl­edge and applied prac­tice.

More info:

Published by: Claire Fontaine on Jul 17, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/18/2009

pdf

 
Claire M. FontaineMay 31, 2009
Online Teaching Communities from Preservice through Proficiency
Professor Nick MichelliUrban Education Ph.D. ProgramCUNY Graduate Center Educating Educators
Defining the issue
1
 
Claire M. FontaineMay 31, 2009
Transitioning from pre-service preparation to full time work as a classroom teacher presentssignificant personal and professional challenges to inexperienced educators. Regardless of whether one is working in an urban, suburban or rural context or something in between, the senseof responsibility and feelings of isolation and self-doubt can be overwhelming. New teachers areoften assigned to more challenging classes avoided by experienced teachers with seniority privileges. Furthermore, the working conditions in schools can lack collegiality and thus seemhostile to newcomers seeking guidance and support.The frustration experienced by new teachers is a primary cause of the current teacher retention crisis. The teacher retention crisis is not, as is often believed, primarily due to high ratesof teacher retirement, increases in student enrollment, or a failure to recruit teachers to work inthose schools categorized as lowest performing. Recent studies suggest that it is our apparentinability to
retain
the most credentialed teachers in our lowest performing schools that hasfueled the crisis. According to a November 2008 report of the State Educational TechnologyDirectors Association (SETDA), teacher turnover in public schools nationwide costs taxpayers$7.3 billion annually, as 40 to 50 percent of new teachers leave the profession within five years. New York City public schools alone lose about $115 million each year to teacher turnover (CPRE, 2007).Teachers who leave cite serious problems with the instructional, collegial and systemicconditions of their working environment (Futernick, 2007). Schools serving low-income student populations are worse at providing new teachers with mentoring and support. It makes sense thatschools with fewer resources in general would also tend to have fewer resources in particular tosupport the mentoring needs of new teachers. Schools with more resources also tend to presentless frustrating working conditions that mitigate the threat of attrition to some extent. This
2
 
Claire M. FontaineMay 31, 2009
“support gap” suffered by new teachers in high poverty schools is linked to lower measures of  job satisfaction in the short term and higher rates of new teacher attrition (Johnson, Kardos,Kauffman, Liu & Donaldson, 2004).Comprehensive induction, which refers to an integrated program of high-quality structuredmentoring, common planning time, ongoing professional development, and membership in amulti-site network, can staunch attrition to half of what it would be otherwise (Ingersoll &Kralik, 2004). When schools commit to providing high quality comprehensive induction to newteachers, the investment pays off, literally; for every $1 invested, schools see a payoff of $1.66over a five year period. (Villar & Strong, 2007). However, only one percent of teachersnationwide have access to a comprehensive induction program of the scope outlined above(Smith & Ingersoll, 2004). Furthermore, few states provide fully funded mandated induction programs, in large part because induction has historically been regarded as a district or schoolresponsibility (Britton, Raizen, Paine & Huntley, 2005).The task facing stakeholders, particularly state departments of education, local schooldistricts, and university teacher education programs, is to develop innovative and paradigm- bending systems and structures that support new teachers as they make the difficult transitionfrom the pre-service preparation program into full-time positions as classroom teachers across arange of different contexts.
Reviewing the literature
The existing structures that define the work that takes place in schools are relics of anineteenth century factory model of teaching and learning. These structures are predicated on thelabor needs of an industrial economy, the prevalence of scientific management-inspiredapproaches to employee management, and behaviorist learning theory - conditions that no longer 
3

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->