Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam The Great Persian Poet: translated

the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam The Great Persian Poet: translated

Ratings: (0)|Views: 106|Likes:
Published by Saami Asa
Poems of Omar Khayyam
About the Poet some unknown facts of his life and history:
The Story of Omar Khayyam

GHIZATHUDIN ABULFATH IBN IBRAHIM AL KHAYYAMI, who is generally known under the name Omar Khayyám, spent most of his life at Naishápúr. There is a good deal of uncertainty about his dates, but he seems to have lived during the latter part of the eleventh and the beginning of the twelfth centuries. There is a tradition that he died in 1123, but we cannot place too much confidence in it. The most signficant episode in his early years was his friendship with two unusual young men, Nizam al Mulk and Hassan ibn Subbuh. According to the legend these boys agreed that if one of them should come to fame and fortune he would show kindness to the other two. The lucky one was Nizam, and he undertook to carry out the promise. He made Hassan Court Chamberlain. This was a poor move. Hassan turned out to be a troublesome courtier, and was exiled from the Court. He became the head of an exceedingly blood-thirsty and troublesome band of fanatics called Ismaili. They seem to have specialized in assassination; some etymologists tend to derive this word from Hassan, but others connect it with hashish. Omar did not ask for anything so spectacular, he merely desired to be raised so far above want that he could give his life to his favorite studies, mathematics and astronomy. This modest request was granted; he made some return by his work in reforming the calendar.

Omar's fame as a scientist has, in recent years, been completely obliterated by his brilliant reputation as a poet. A good share of the credit for this belongs to his peerless translator, Edward Fitzgerald. I have no competence to express an appreciation here, neither is there any reason for me to discuss his anti-religious philosophy. Some persons have maintained that he was grossly immoral, a libertine addicted to unnatural vice. Perhaps he was, perhaps not. The impression which I get from reading the Rubã`iyyat is that of a sophisticated and disillusioned, but not unkindly cynic, who praises the attainable delights of the senses, and treats his adversaries with caustic wit. Very likely he was an atheist, but he was willing enough to use pious phrases of a conventional pattern. Here are the opening lines of Omar (q.v., Woepcke's translation): "Au nom de Dieu, clément et miséricordieux. Louange à Dieu, seigneur des mondes, une fin heureuse à ceux qui le craignent, et point d'inimitié si ce n'est que contre les injustes. Que la bénédiction divine repose sur les prophètes, et particulièrement sur Mohammed et sur toute sa famille." He closes his essay with these words: "C'est Dieu qui facilite la solution de ces difficultés par ses bienfaits et sa générosité." He frequently wishes that God shall be merciful to this or that other scientist. Such piety is common enough in Islamic writing; very likely Omar had his tongue in his cheek while expressing himself in this fashion, but these phrases did flow from his pen.

Omar wrote a treatise, now completely lost, which seems to have contained something of great interest in the history of mathematics
Poems of Omar Khayyam
About the Poet some unknown facts of his life and history:
The Story of Omar Khayyam

GHIZATHUDIN ABULFATH IBN IBRAHIM AL KHAYYAMI, who is generally known under the name Omar Khayyám, spent most of his life at Naishápúr. There is a good deal of uncertainty about his dates, but he seems to have lived during the latter part of the eleventh and the beginning of the twelfth centuries. There is a tradition that he died in 1123, but we cannot place too much confidence in it. The most signficant episode in his early years was his friendship with two unusual young men, Nizam al Mulk and Hassan ibn Subbuh. According to the legend these boys agreed that if one of them should come to fame and fortune he would show kindness to the other two. The lucky one was Nizam, and he undertook to carry out the promise. He made Hassan Court Chamberlain. This was a poor move. Hassan turned out to be a troublesome courtier, and was exiled from the Court. He became the head of an exceedingly blood-thirsty and troublesome band of fanatics called Ismaili. They seem to have specialized in assassination; some etymologists tend to derive this word from Hassan, but others connect it with hashish. Omar did not ask for anything so spectacular, he merely desired to be raised so far above want that he could give his life to his favorite studies, mathematics and astronomy. This modest request was granted; he made some return by his work in reforming the calendar.

Omar's fame as a scientist has, in recent years, been completely obliterated by his brilliant reputation as a poet. A good share of the credit for this belongs to his peerless translator, Edward Fitzgerald. I have no competence to express an appreciation here, neither is there any reason for me to discuss his anti-religious philosophy. Some persons have maintained that he was grossly immoral, a libertine addicted to unnatural vice. Perhaps he was, perhaps not. The impression which I get from reading the Rubã`iyyat is that of a sophisticated and disillusioned, but not unkindly cynic, who praises the attainable delights of the senses, and treats his adversaries with caustic wit. Very likely he was an atheist, but he was willing enough to use pious phrases of a conventional pattern. Here are the opening lines of Omar (q.v., Woepcke's translation): "Au nom de Dieu, clément et miséricordieux. Louange à Dieu, seigneur des mondes, une fin heureuse à ceux qui le craignent, et point d'inimitié si ce n'est que contre les injustes. Que la bénédiction divine repose sur les prophètes, et particulièrement sur Mohammed et sur toute sa famille." He closes his essay with these words: "C'est Dieu qui facilite la solution de ces difficultés par ses bienfaits et sa générosité." He frequently wishes that God shall be merciful to this or that other scientist. Such piety is common enough in Islamic writing; very likely Omar had his tongue in his cheek while expressing himself in this fashion, but these phrases did flow from his pen.

Omar wrote a treatise, now completely lost, which seems to have contained something of great interest in the history of mathematics

More info:

Published by: Saami Asa on Oct 08, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/25/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn All Quiet on the Western Front  Animal Farm As You Like It BelovedBeowulf Billy Budd, BenitoCereno, Bartleby theScrivener, and Other Tales The Bluest EyeBrave New WorldCat on a Hot TinRoof  The Catcher in theRyeCatch-22Cat’s Cradle The Color PurpleCrime andPunishment  The CrucibleDaisy Miller, The Turn of the Screw,and Other TalesDarkness at NoonDavid CopperfieldDeath of a Salesman The Divine Comedy Don QuixoteDraculaDublinersEmmaFahrenheit 451 A Farewell to ArmsFrankenstein The General Prologueto the Canterbury  Tales The Glass Menagerie The Grapes of WrathGreat Expectations The Great Gatsby Gulliver’s TravelsHamlet  The Handmaid’s TaleHeart of DarknessI Know Why theCaged Bird Sings The Iliad The Interpretation of DreamsInvisible Man Jane Eyre The Joy Luck Club Julius Caesar The JungleKing LearLong Day’s Journey Into Night Lord of the Flies The Lord of the Rings Macbeth The Merchant of  Venice The Metamorphosis A Midsummer Night’sDream Moby-Dick  My ÁntoniaNative SonNight 1984 The Odyssey Oedipus Rex The Old Man and theSeaOn the RoadOne Flew Over theCuckoo’s Nest One Hundred Years of SolitudeOthelloParadise Lost  The Pardoner’s Tale A Passage to IndiaPersuasionPortnoy’s Complaint  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young ManPride and PrejudiceRagtime The Red Badge of Courage The Rime of the Ancient MarinerRomeo & Juliet  The Rubáiyát of OmarKhayyám The Scarlet Letter A Scholarly Look at  The Diary of AnneFrank  A Separate PeaceSilas MarnerSlaughterhouse-FiveSong of Myself Song of Solomon The Sonnets of  William ShakespeareSophie’s Choice The Sound and theFury  The Stranger A Streetcar NamedDesireSula The Sun Also Rises A Tale of Two Cities The Tale of Genji The Tales of Poe The Tempest  Tess of theD’Urbervilles Their Eyes Were Watching God Things Fall Apart  To Kill a MockingbirdUlysses Waiting for Godot  Walden The Waste Land White Noise Wuthering Heights
Bloom’s Modern Critical Interpretations 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->