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The Peace Offering.

The Peace Offering.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. W. THISTLETHWAITE, M.A.,



Lbvit. III. 1.

And if his oblaíion be a sacrifice of peace-
offering^ if he offer it of íhe herd ; whether
it be male or female, he shuU offernt nnth"
out blemish before the Lord.
BY REV. W. THISTLETHWAITE, M.A.,



Lbvit. III. 1.

And if his oblaíion be a sacrifice of peace-
offering^ if he offer it of íhe herd ; whether
it be male or female, he shuU offernt nnth"
out blemish before the Lord.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Oct 10, 2013
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THE PEACE-OFFERIG.BY REV. W. THISTLETHWAITE, M.A.,Lbvit. III. 1.And if his oblaíion be a sacrifice of peace-offering^ if he offer it of íhe herd ; whetherit be male or female, he shuU offernt nnth"out blemish before the Lord.CoTiUiG our enquiiies into the natoreand intention of the yarious ceremonies of the Old Testamenty we come now to thepeace-offering. And here again I wish us tobear this point always in mind that everj sa-crifice had some peculiar reference to Christ,and shadowed forth the method of acceptancethi'ough him, or the privileges or duties of those who partake of his grace. Our enqui-ries therefore are not aíter matters of ancientdate, which are become obsolete and alto-gether useless^ but we have to examine intoTHE PEACE-OFFERIG. 57subjects which are as full of mstruction bothon doctrinal and practical subjects with whichourselves are immediately concemed, as theyare interesting for their antiquity. In ex-plaining the ceremonj of the peace-offering,I shall begin, as I bave done in the case of the preceding ceremonies, with stating thelaw concerning it.I. There were some p£U*ticular occasionson which peace-offerings were ordered to beoffered ; but in general these were voluntaryofferings presented in consequence of somevow, or in acknowledgment of some mercy,as we find by reference to the seventh chapterof this bookf where they are more fully de-scribed. The sacrifice was an animal, which
 
might be taken from the herd, or from theflocks^ and which might also be either maleor female, but which must be without ble-mish, as in all such cases. The animal wasto be kiUed, the hand of the offerer to belaid upon its head, the blood was to be sprin-kled bythe priest about the altar preciselyas in the case of the burnt-offering. Alongwith the animal, " unleavened cakes mingledD 558 THE PEACE-OFFERIG.with oil, and unleavened wafers anointed withoil, and cakes mingled with oil, of fine flour,fried," were to be offered. And besides thecakes of unleavened bread, there was to bebrought leavened ,bread also, because, sincethis sacrifice partook, as we shall see, moreof the nature of a social meal than any of theothers, therefore the bread which they gene-rally used at their common meals was also tobe presented. For, whereas when a bumt-offering was offered the whole was consumedby fire unto the Lord, and when a meat-offering was offered part was bunit as amemorial unto the Lord and the rest belongedto the priest, in the peace-offerfcig there wasa further division, and the offerer himself re-"ceived by much the greatest share.Tlie division was made thus. One partwas to be the Lord's. AU the inward fat of the animal, with the kidneys, and the caulover the liver, was to be entirely consumedby fire upon the altar. And this was a stand-ing ordinance to the Israelites, as we read inthe seventeenth verse, " It shall be a perpe-tual statute for your generations througfaoatTHE PEACE-OFFERIG. 59
 
all your dwellings, that je eat neither fat norblood," It was the inward fat or suet onlythat was thus prohibited ; and it is to be ob-served that the prohibition extended not onlyto this part of the fat and the blood of suchanimals as were offered in sacrifíce^ but alsoof those which they kiUed for their commonfood. " The fat is the Lord's/' it is said,probably to intimate that the best and richestis his due ; while the reason for the prohibi-tion of blood is expressly assigned (in Levit.xvii. 11) in these words, " For the life of theflesh is in the blood^ and I have given it toyou upon the altar, to make an atonementfor your souls : for it is the blood thatmaketh an atonement for the soul." Hereis a powerful reason for making such a differ-ence between the blood and the flesh of theanimals sacrifíced : to the blood, as making anatonement for the soul, and therein typical of the blood of Christ; to the blood, as especiallycontaining the life, and therein typifying thatlife of Christ which he surrendered upon thecross to redeem the soul fi-om death, a pecu-liar sacredness was attached, that mankind^60 THE PËACE-OFFERIG.in after ages^ might tbe more easily be ledto see tbe infinite importance of tbis funda-mental doctríne of tbe gospel, tbat tbe life of tbe buman body assumed bj tbe Son of God^and ofifered up upon tbe cross, is tbe solemedium of peace and reconciUation witb anoffended God. Tbis was tbe great lessón tabe taugbt by tbe strict injunction tbat in nocase wbatever sbould tbey eat tbe blood» buttbey sbould always pour it on tbe eartb aswater. Tbe object of tbe probibition beiugnow accomplisbed, and blood being uo longeroffered as a typical atonement, tbere need beno doubt about eating tbe 'blood, as someCbristiaus are scrupulous to do. Tbese tbeilweré tbe parts of tbe peace-offering wbichwere tbe Lord's, the fat and tbe blood.

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