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Frank L. Hunt at Treaty Four

Frank L. Hunt at Treaty Four

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Frank Hunt a lawyer from Detroit came to Red River in 1860. His second wife was Harriet Fox, the daughter of the famous Chief Mahkaysis. Her uncle and two brothers were part of the Treaty Four negotiations. Hunt reported on these negotiations for The Manitoban. The Metis children of Frank and Harriet later took scrip.
Frank Hunt a lawyer from Detroit came to Red River in 1860. His second wife was Harriet Fox, the daughter of the famous Chief Mahkaysis. Her uncle and two brothers were part of the Treaty Four negotiations. Hunt reported on these negotiations for The Manitoban. The Metis children of Frank and Harriet later took scrip.

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Published by: Lawrence J. Barkwell on Oct 12, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/03/2014

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Frank L. Hunt
The only newspaper to send a correspondent to the Treaty Four negotiations was
The Manitoban
which sent F.L. Hunt who was married to a Cree/Assiniboine woman namedKah-nah-nah-Kah-po-mit (Harriet Fox).Hunt and Kah-nah-nah-Kah-po-mit were hosted in the Indian camp by her brotherOkanese, as their father Chief Mahkaysis (The Fox) had recently passed away.
1
Mahkaysis (Fox) was a son of Le Sonnant and younger brother of Kahkewistahaw (Hewho Flies Around). He was a renowned hunter, peacemaker, and linguist who was headchief of the eastern Cree by mid-century. Okanese and Pasqua, who were both sons ofMahkaysis, signed Treaty No. 4, made at Fort Qu’Appelle in 1874, as did their uncleKahkewistahaw.Hunt described the journey to the Treaty Four negotiations at Fort Qu’Appelle in theSeptember 26, 1874 edition of the paper. He joined the brigade of carts “bound withTreaty supplies” at the Portage and traveled with them for 15 days before reaching thesite of the Qu’Appelle Valley.In his “Notes of the QuAppelle Treaty” Hunt also described the scene at the treaty
Grounds :A few camps of half-breeds; some rude houses, from one of which was flying aflag indicative of the immense bargains to be had within; a great camp of Indianson the plain across the river; the Companys fort beyond; the whole shut in by the
 brown bluff.... The assemblage of Indians was not as large as might naturally havebeen expected, --a few Sioux as lookers-on, the bulk of the Otchipwes [Saulteaux]and not a great many Crees, who were absent at the Buffalo hunt securing theirwinter’s provisions.
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Metis Scrip claims:Hunt, Sylvester; address: Poplar Point, Manitoba; claim no. 2099; born: 1 Feb.,1878 at Qu'Appelle; father: Frank Larnard Hunt (White); mother: Harriet Fox(Indian)Hunt, Francis; address: Poplar Point, Manitoba; claim no. 2100; born: 23 July,1880 at Qu'Appelle; father: Frank Larnard Hunt (White); mother: Harriet Fox(Indian)
1
LAC, RG10, Volume 3612, File 4012, “Frank L. Hunt to Lieutenant -Governor Alexander Morris,QuAppelle, September, 1874.
2
F.L. Hunt, “The Indian Treaty! Scenes en Route. The Fair Valley of the QuAppelle. Letters From
Under a Cart” The Manitoban, September 26, 1874.
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