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Differential Amplifiers

Differential Amplifiers

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Published by nidhi_26
Differential Amplifiers (Chapter 8 in Horenstein)
Differential Amplifiers (Chapter 8 in Horenstein)

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Published by: nidhi_26 on Oct 14, 2013
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12/11/2013

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Differential Amplifiers
(Chapter 8 in Horenstein)
Differential amplifiers are pervasive in analog electronics
 – 
Low frequency amplifiers
 – 
High frequency amplifiers
 – 
Operational amplifiers
 – 
the first stage is a differential amplifier 
 – 
Analog modulators
 – 
Logic gates
Advantages
 – 
Large input resistance
 – 
High gain
 – 
Differential input
 – 
Good bias stability
 – 
Excellent device parameter tracking in IC implementation
Examples
 – 
Bipolar 741 op-amp (mature, well-practiced, cheap)
 – 
CMOS or BiCMOS op-amp designs (more recent, popular)
R. W. Knepper SC412, slide 8-1
 
Amplifier With Bias Stabilizing Neg Feedback Resistor 
Single transistor common-emitter or common-source amplifiers often use a biasstabilizing resistor in the common node leg (to ground) as shown below
 – 
Such a resistor provides negative feedback to stabilize dc bias
 – 
But, the negative feedback also reduces gain accordingly
We can shunt the common node bias resistor with a capacitor to reduce the negativeimpact on gain
 – 
Has no effect on gain reduction at low frequencies, however 
 – 
Large bypass capacitors are difficult to implement in IC design due to large area
Conclusion: try to avoid using feedback resistor R2 in biasing network 
R. W. Knepper SC412, slide 8-2
 
Differential Amplifier Topology
In contrast to the single device common-emitter (common-source) amplifier withnegative feedback bias resistor of the previous slide, the differential ckt shown atleft provides a better bypass scheme.
 – 
Device 2 provides bypass for active device 1
 – 
Bias provided by dc current source
 – 
Device 2 can also be used for input, allowinga differential input
 – 
Load devices might be resistors or theymight be current sources (current mirrors)
The basic differential amplifier topology can be used for bipolar diff amp design or for CMOS diff amp design, or for other activedevices, such as JFETs
R. W. Knepper SC412, slide 8-3

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