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FreeNAS

FreeNAS

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Published by Naveen Krishnan

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Published by: Naveen Krishnan on Jul 23, 2009
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04/19/2012

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Seminar AbstractFreeNAS
What is NAS?
NAS or Network Attached Storage is file-level computer data storage connected to acomputer network providing data access to heterogeneous network clients.
 
A NAS unit
 
is essentially a self-contained computer connected to a network, with the sole purposeof supplying file-based data storage services to other devices on the network.
What is FreeNAS?
FreeNAS is an open source NAS software designed for use on standard computer hardware.
Its functions:-
1.
Provide data storage
2.
Provide file systems
3.
Provide access to files
4.
Provide management of these functionalities
Features of FreeNAS:-
1.Is an open-source software and is easy to setup
2.
Supports: CIFS (Samba), FTP, NFS, rsync, AFP protocols, iSCSI, S.M.A.R.T.,
3.
Supports software RAID (0,1,5)
4.
Has a web-based configuration interface5.FreeNAS takes less than 64 MB once installed on CompactFlash, hard driveor USB flash drive.6.Has plug-ins for various tools like SlimServer, iTunes etc7.Supports most of the existing hardware components.8.Provide security and SNMP(Simple Network Management) features.
Why FreeNAS?
1.RAID and Clustering is inbuilt thus data availability is usually high.2.Performance can be increased by NAS because the file serving is done bythe NAS and not done by a server responsible for also doing other processing.3.FreeNAS can be run solely from disk drive itself 4.Many of the popular software and hardware components are supported, so noneed for major up gradations.5.NAS can enable simpler and lower cost systems such as load-balancing andfault-tolerant email and web server systems by providing storage services
Reference 1
http://administratosphere.wordpress.com/2008/02/22/open-source-network-attached-storage-nas/
Open Source Network Attached Storage (NAS)
22 February 2008
 
 
Gary Sims wrote an excellent and in-depth review of FreeNAS(a FreeBSD-basednetwork attached storage system). His article details his experiences withFreeNAS, how it worked, where it (or he) failed, and other tips and tricks that hefound as he went.While FreeNAS appears to be the most popular (at least according toGoogle!)there are others out there, includingOpenFiler (which is Linux-based).A NASbasically is a dedicated file server that provides many different protocols tothe clients and acts as an appliance. In some ways, this is no different than thehistorical file server – but in these cases, the NAS device is much more a turnkeysolution with no other purpose. Many NAS systems support Windows file sharing,Macintosh file sharing, NFS, and a plethora of other protocols – all in order tomake files available as much as possible. OpenFiler is one of these. NAS devices were traditionally contrasted against SANs (storage area networks).The NAS provided a filesystem on the network; the SAN provides a block deviceon the network. This apparent sharp division of purposes does not exist in reality:some NAS systems also provide SAN resources as well.Which – FreeNAS or OpenFiler – would I use? Can’t say – OpenFiler caught myeye first, but FreeNAS has the FreeBSD base. I’m liable to try both of them one of these days.
Reference 2
http://administratosphere.wordpress.com/2009/03/31/network-attached-storage-nas/
31 March 2009
 
Once you hear what a NASappliance does, you might be tempted to think (as I did) whatall the fuss might be about. But there are reasons for a NAS appliance, though a NASisn’t for everybody. Network Attached Storage is nothing more than a server with a pile of disks and a dozendifferent ways to access them. For most intents and purposes, the difference between aFile Server of yesteryear and the Network Attached Storage of today is conceptuallyrather minimal.

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