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False Ideas of a Satanic Devil in the Book of Job

False Ideas of a Satanic Devil in the Book of Job

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Published by Unlocked_wisdom
This paper shows that Job's adversary is not Satan, providing evidence that a/or fallen angel(s) are not in the book of Job. Proof that bias from denominational interpretations have promoted belief in a devil that cannot be substantiated by original texts, with a discussion on the implications of such false belief. Evidence that God is Job's adversary.
This paper shows that Job's adversary is not Satan, providing evidence that a/or fallen angel(s) are not in the book of Job. Proof that bias from denominational interpretations have promoted belief in a devil that cannot be substantiated by original texts, with a discussion on the implications of such false belief. Evidence that God is Job's adversary.

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Published by: Unlocked_wisdom on Oct 17, 2013
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02/13/2014

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Falsification of a Satanic devil through denominational biasin the book of Job
Yahweh of War Ministries
 
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Table of Contents
The nature of the adversary ............................................................................................................. 4The adversary was in a continued argument with Yahweh ............................................................ 6Job as Yahweh’s example ............................................................................................................... 8Problems with a spiritual devil ....................................................................................................... 8Summery ......................................................................................................................................... 8Evidence from Job that the adversary was a man ........................................................................... 9Discussion 1.1 ............................................................................................................................... 10Was Yahweh Job’s Satan? ............................................................................................................ 12Discussion 1.2 ............................................................................................................................... 13Further support that the “hand” belongs to Yahweh not the accuser ............................................ 14Discussion 1.3 ............................................................................................................................... 15Conclusion .................................................................................................................................... 16Considerations............................................................................................................................... 17
 
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Because theologians commonly approach textual exegesis with a biased impression, throughtheir habitual methodology, a high improbability occurs while attempting to discover the mostauthentic interpretation of a text, even when strict clarity is demonstrated in the text itself. Whencritically examining the book of Job, many have introduced these examinational errors, thisleading to textual obscuration opposed to clarification. And when said errors are solidified andlabeled “proper theological interpretation”, the reality of reaching authentic results becomesimpossible, forcing academics to react “radically” in order to depart from theological expectation,making fair exegesis rare, creating a formidable predicament in proper theological teaching.The Book of Job is a poetic commentary on the nature of Yahweh’s sovereignty. It deals with thethemes of: justice, mercy, blessings, curses, salvation and most importantly the centrality of Yahweh’s will over humankinds.Job begins with a legal narrative, ending with the same, this being a point commonly overlookedby many expositors. In our text, persons are said to have presented themselves before God, underthe auspice of gaining His legal foresight or approval. Many theologians with a protestant
aggadic
interpretation, eisegete these persons, who are labelled the “sons of God” (Job 1:6) to beheavenly angels who are taking part in a Babylonish holy council ceremony as presented inIsaiah 6:1-8. The reason this traditional explication becomes challenging to the text is becausethe historical context in which Job is academically presumed to be written (post Abrahamic, Pre-Mosaic) did not promote such a reading. Within this pre-pentateuchal timeframe, no developedtheology that expounded or alluded to the existence of a angelic council, or designated times forangelic gatherings were recorded, more importantly, heavenly angels are not inherentlydiscussed in the Job text anywhere, this supporting the notion that the development of such aninterpretation is anachronistic, and composed of much later historical impressions (if notinherited from Babylonian/Egyptian myth, which is unfounded conjecture). Opposed to thisabove presented view, readers in the pre-pentateuchal period would have been well acquaintedwith consecrated gatherings for the purpose of worship, prayer, and self presentation, this tooffer sacrifices or attain spiritual guidance from Yahweh’s presence; serving to support the idea that the sons of god are human beings and not heavenly at all.

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