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Four Elements That Create a Motivational Environment

Four Elements That Create a Motivational Environment

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Published by Carl Sawatzky
Four Elements That Create a Motivational Environment
Keeping staff engaged and motivated to do their best can be a challenge for any manager, especially in a tough business climate. In this installment of our Management Insights, author Mimi Banta offers up a “four pillar” solution that addresses the needs of individuals in order to create a more positive and productive team.
Four Elements That Create a Motivational Environment
Keeping staff engaged and motivated to do their best can be a challenge for any manager, especially in a tough business climate. In this installment of our Management Insights, author Mimi Banta offers up a “four pillar” solution that addresses the needs of individuals in order to create a more positive and productive team.

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Published by: Carl Sawatzky on Jul 27, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/05/2013

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Learning Tree
Management Insights
EDITION 010
CALL 
1-800-843-8733
OR VISIT 
www.learningtree.ca
Expert Advice from Today’s Top Professionals
Four Elements that Createa Motivational Environment
Managers oten wonder why their employees seem to lackmotivation. Ironically, it’s not because employees areapathetic or unwilling but because o well-intentionedmanagerial actions that—more oten than not—de-motivateemployees.Here’s an example: to reward John or his superb handlingo a complicated project, his manager gives him a newassignment that oers great opportunity. Later, walkingpast John’s cubicle, his manager overhears a coworkercongratulating John or landing such a terric project butis then taken aback by John’s response: “That’s all veryattering, but I’m the one who has to tell my amily that it’slate nights and weekends in the ofce again! It seems thepayback or doing great work here is to get more piled on.”In another scenario, Pat is taking on a new role that will buildher project management skills and committee experience.She suggests to her manager that it would be most eectiveto meet with the end users and do a needs assessment beorebeginning the project. Despite some private misgivings, themanager allows Pat to proceed. However, upon presentingthe results o the assessment, her manager realizes that Patcontacted the wrong individuals and promised things shecan’t possibly deliver. Fortunately, the mistakes are caughtbeore any problems can arise, but her manager’s only choiceis to tell her to start over. Ater a ew weeks with no newresults, her manager can only assume that—even given theopportunity to correct her mistakes—Pat isn’t motivatedenough to go back and do a better job.In these examples, the managers didn’t consider the needso the individuals and align their actions accordingly. ForJohn, his reward o “more work”—however great the careeropportunity—was completely at odds with his amily’s needs.In Pat’s case, had her manager provided clearer direction andcommunication regarding expectations at the start, or evenbetter eedback at the end, it would have produced a betteroutcome.Fortunately, there are our very clear elements managers canapply to set the right goals and establish an environment thatwill motivate sta at both an organizational
and 
individuallevel.Moreimportantly, taking these actions tells employeesthat you are accessible as a person—not just as a manager—when they need you.
Mimi Banta
This month, our
 Management Insights
article focuses on how tomotivate your employees from both an organizational perspectiveand an individual one as well. Author Mimi Banta, a consultantspecializing in Human Performance Improvement (HPI), offersa clear methodology to achieve both.
Productivity through Education

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