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Shifting Sands Bp Shell Rising Risks Update 2

Shifting Sands Bp Shell Rising Risks Update 2

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Published by: TheBusinessInsider on Jul 27, 2009
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06/14/2012

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EdmontonFort McMurrayGrande Prairie
PEACE RIVERTAR SANDS
ALBERTASASKATCHEWAN
ATHABASCATAR SANDSCOLD LAKETAR SANDS
Peace River ComplexSunriseMuskeg River Mine (AOSP)Jackpine Mine (AOSP)Pierre River Mine (AOSP)
Shell operated and majorityowned tar sands assetBP joint venture with HuskyPipeline
KEY:
OrionCorridor PipelineGrosmont VentureScotford Upgrader 1Scotford Upgrader 2
CANADAUNITED STATESOF AMERICA
 
 D E F E R R E D D E F E R R E D D E F E R R E D
 D E F E R R E D
 D E F E R R E D D E F E R R E D
 S L O  W E D
The map of Alberta in July 2009 remains littered with deferredtar sands projects. The fall in oil prices following the $147 peakin July 2008 has undermined their viability – these projectsneed strong oil prices to generate a profit. The InternationalEnergy Agency (IEA) has shown that of the two million barrelsa day (mb/d) of non-OPEC oil production capacity that hasbeen deferred or cancelled since the oil price fell, a full 1.7 mb/d– 85% – derives from Canadian tar sands projects.
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Shell has passed the halfway mark with the construction of the first phase of the Jackpine Mine and the associatedupgrader expansion at Scotford. The construction of thisexpansion was well underway when the market crashed.However, the subsequent phases of the Athabasca Oil SandsProject (AOSP) with a potential additional mining capacity of up to 520,000 b/d remain deferred ‘until market conditionsand economics improve.
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SHIFTING SANDS:HOW A CHANGING ECONOMY COULDBURY THE TAR SANDS INDUSTRY
BP AND SHELL: RISING RISKS
TAR SANDS UPDATE 2. JULY 2009
 
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The same conditions have deferred development of Shell’s hugeresources of deeper Canadian bitumen that require
in situ 
methods of production. These resources, located at PeaceRiver, Cold Lake and Grosmont, have been estimated to containat least 55 billion barrels of ‘oil in place
3
, and may constituteShell’s single biggest oil resource.Meanwhile, BP and its joint venture partner Husky Oil havedeferred the final investment decision on the Sunrise SAGD
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project by a year to the first half of 2010.
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While the projectmay benefit from falling costs in Alberta, the go-ahead stillhinges on the companies’ expectations for oil prices in themedium to long term.
STRUCTURALCHANGEAHEAD
This second update to our
Rising Risks 
report
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builds on earlierwork examining the structural macro-economic threats to tarsands production. It draws together fresh insights into themedium and long term oil market from diverse sourcesincluding the IEA, OPEC, BP, Cambridge Energy ResearchAssociates, Douglas Westwood, Arthur D. Little ManagementConsultants, Ernst & Young, Risk Metrics and others.The resulting analysis is unsettling for the tar sands industry.It suggests that the international oil companies (IOCs) facesignificant challenges to their current business plans for oilproduction. While risk is nothing new to the oil industry,the kind of structural change being signalled today isunprecedented. Significantly, the implications are particularlysalient not only for tar sands projects but also for other’frontier’ oil projects championed by the IOCs. Ultra-deepwaterand offshore arctic resources face a similar challenge as, liketar sands oil, they also represent the ‘marginal barrel’.
While risk is nothing new to the oil industry,the kind of structural change being signalled today is unprecedented.
The main factors constituting this threat to the IOCs are:
Y
As former Shell CEO Jeroen van der Veer has said severaltimes recently, the era of ‘easy oil’ is over.
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Persistentresource nationalism and depletion of conventional resourcesin Europe and North America has left the IOCs with difficult-to-access oil to divide between them. This means that thebulk of the oil that is left for them to exploit is to be found inthe tar sands and in ultra-deepwater and other marginalresources such as the Arctic. This is reflected in thebreakdown of their total resources, a longer term analysisof their reserves than those they disclose as ‘proven’ or‘probable’ (see figs 2 and 3 on page 11).
Y
All of these resources are very expensive to produce, requirelong lead-in times to bring on stream and in many caseshave controversial environmental and social impacts that willcost more to ameliorate. The expense of bringing much of this oil to market means that the sustained oil price neededto do so is dangerously close to a ‘break point’ price beyondwhich oil demand is constrained via changes in consumerbehaviour and reduced economic growth.
Y
While the oil price may at times rise above that ceiling, theconsequence is demand destruction and price deterioration.We are still in the midst of a particularly aggressive cycleof this phenomenon.
Y
The difference between the recovery periods followingprevious oil shocks and the current one is that a significantproportion of today’s oil demand decline is permanent.In other words, this recession has triggered demanddestruction as well as demand suppression.
Y
This demand destruction is driven by the disintegration of market barriers to significant improvements in efficiency,and transportation technology diversity, which are in turndriven by both consumer sentiment and government policyaimed at addressing energy security, limiting exposure tooil price volatility and addressing climate change.
Y
As a result, oil demand in the US and OECD has peaked.
Y
While demand in non-OECD countries still has significantgrowth potential, it is unlikely to grow at the rates that werebeing predicted before the recession, and may also peakwithin the coming decade. Therefore a global peak in oildemand may be within sight. The implications of this forthe high cost production that IOCs increasingly face areextremely serious.
Y
The issue of the steep decline in traditional oil suppliesthat some refer to as ‘peak oil’ may at times create‘supply squeezes’ when supply declines at a greaterrate than demand and prices will spike. But each supplysqueeze will create further permanent demanddestruction. When a demand peak is reached, the mostexpensive-to-extract oil will face a serious threat asOPEC producers move to monetise their reserves ina significantly different market paradigm.
 
oil demand in the US and OECD has peaked […] a global peak in oil demand may be within sight. The implications of this for the high cost productionthat IOCs increasingly face are serious.
© Greenpeace / Eamon Mac Mahon

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