Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Christ Crucified.

Christ Crucified.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
STEPHEN OLIN, D.D., LL.D.,



For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek after wisdom
But we preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumbling-block, and
unto the Greeks foolishness; but unto them which are called, both
Jews and Greeks, Christ, the power of God and the wisdom of God.
Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the weakness
of God is stronger than men. — 1 Cor., i., 22-25.
STEPHEN OLIN, D.D., LL.D.,



For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek after wisdom
But we preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumbling-block, and
unto the Greeks foolishness; but unto them which are called, both
Jews and Greeks, Christ, the power of God and the wisdom of God.
Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the weakness
of God is stronger than men. — 1 Cor., i., 22-25.

More info:

Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Oct 18, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/18/2013

pdf

text

original

 
CHRIST CRUCIFIED.STEPHE OLI, D.D., LL.D.,For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek after wisdomBut we preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumbling-block, andunto the Greeks foolishness; but unto them which are called, bothJews and Greeks, Christ, the power of God and the wisdom of God.Because the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the weaknessof God is stronger than men. — 1 Cor., i., 22-25.Jews and Greeks, among whom the early ministry of theapostles and their successors was mostly exercised, constitu-ted originally, as they may now be taken to represent, thetwo great classes who reject, or, receiving, corrupt and per-vert the Gospel. And these classes were not, and are notformed chiefly by national customs, and peculiarities, and dif-ferences of education. They grow out of the tendencies of our nature, as modified and misdirected by tlie fall and itsconsequences. Men, not as Jews, or Greeks, or barbarians,but as men, and fallen men, incline to a gross or materialtheology, and are instinctively averse to a spiritual religion." The natural man receiveth not the things of the spirit of God, for they are foolishness unto him, neither can he knowthem, because they are spiritually discerned."^ This passageof Scripture describes the stronger and the more general tend-ency, and by far the larger class of persons.I. All the forms of idolatry, ancient and modern, fall underthis comprehensive category of the material and the gross,and each of them proves and illustrates the position hereassumed. Their gods of gold, and silver, and wood, andstone — the deification of the planets and the elements — of animals, or abstract principles, with all their religious rites* 1 Cor., ii., 14.
 
256 CHRIST CRUCIFIED.and ceremonies, gorgeous, fantastic, or bloody, were only somany expressions of this inborn tendency to go astray fromthe true God.The imposing apparatus of ceremonial rites and spectacles,adopted by divine wisdom as the best means of making theeternal verities of religion impressive and effective under theJewish dispensation, proved insufficient to satisfy the enor-mous demand for the sensible and the gross by that partially-civilized and stiff-necked people. For nearly a thousandyears after the Exodus from Egypt, their history is largelycomposed of the story of the idolatries and abominations inwhich the ruling principle of man's religious nature so uni-formly seeks and finds indulgence. This strong tendency toidolatry found at length an efiectual antidote in the terriblechastisements of the Almighty, and especially in the disper-sion and ruin of the nation by the Babylonish captivity.The principle, however, remained in full force, and it reap-peared in the time of our Savior, in the guise of a perverseand most absurd devotion to the forms of the Mosaic system,and the traditions with which it had become obscured, whilethe true and spiritual import of the dispensation was quitelost sight of The dogmas and ritual of the system werethe chief obstacles to the right understanding and practiceof the doctrines and moralities they were designed to incul-cate. They clung to the type — to the shadow, and reject-ed the antitype and the substance. It was in this spirit of obstinate and blind devotion to the institutions of the OldTestament, which they had made something worse than anullity by their debasing interpretations, that the Jews metthe overtures of the Gospel as preached by Christ, and after-ward by his disciples. The evidence of miracles, by whichthe divine authority of the new dispensation was attested,was a special arrangement to meet their religious views andprejudices, and a passport to their confidence. True, how-ever, to their national besetment, and to the besetment of 
 
CHRIST CRUCIFIED. 257our fallen nature — ever the same in principle, though greatlyvarious in manifestation — they w^ere disposed to receive theproof instead of the thing proved. They answered exhort-ations to repentance and faith by a demand for miracles.They refused to admit the kingdom of heaven into theirhearts, but were clamorous for demonstrations to the senses.When the Jews demanded a sign from our Savior, and metthe preaching of the apostle with the same requirement, itwas not for the purpose of obtaining clearer proof of the truthof the Gospel, to help their unbelief, for the Savior had per-formed a multitude of miracles in their sight ; and Paul, inthis very epistle to the Corinthians, refers familiarly and re-peatedly to the miracles which he had performed amongthem, so that there was no farther occasion for them as me-dia of proof But the Jews required them as an end. Thisv/as to be the sum and substance of the new rehgion. Theywould not admit its claims as a moral and spiritual dispen-sation. Christ's kingdom was to be earthly — its blessings andprivileges were to be sensible, present, manifest, material.The very essence of it was to be in exhibition and form — gross, earthly, and manifest— not spiritual and invisible.This false view, this fatal misapprehension of the characterand design of the Gospel, was and is the grand obstacle tothe salvation of the seed of Abraham. The vail is yet upontheir hearts. They still require a sign, and look for a Mes-siah adapted to their prejudices and to their grosser nature.They hope for restoration to the Holy Land. Thither theymake pilgrimages. They linger about Zion. They weepand gaze on the ruins of the temple.The Gospel, taking advantage of the progress made underthe Jewish system, and of the favorable state of the world,while it retains the substance and the morals of the old cov-enant and fulfills the law, completely rejects its ritual. Itis eminently a spiritual system. It enjoins only two simple

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->