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Essays in Biblical Interpretation

Essays in Biblical Interpretation

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Published by glennpease
BY HENRY PRESERVED SMITH

DAVENPORT PROFESSOR OF HEBREW AND THE COGNATE
LANGUAGES IN UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
BY HENRY PRESERVED SMITH

DAVENPORT PROFESSOR OF HEBREW AND THE COGNATE
LANGUAGES IN UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

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Published by: glennpease on Oct 20, 2013
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ESSAYS I BIBLICAL ITERPRETATIOBY HERY PRESERVED SMITHDAVEPORT PROFESSOR OF HEBREW AD THE COGATELAGUAGES I UIO THEOLOGICAL SEMIARYBOSTOMARSHALL JOES COMPAY1921PREFACETHIS book does not claim to be a history of Biblical inter-pretation. It is an attempt to illustrate certain ways inwhich the Old Testament part of our Bible has been treatedin the course of the Christian centuries. Since almost everytheologian, Jewish or Christian, has directly or indirectly com-mented on the Scriptures, a complete history of this branch of science would seem to be beyond the powers of any one man.The index to Diestel's work, a work to which I have oftenreferred, shows that he consulted nearly fourteen hundred differ-ent authors. The result is to bewilder rather than to help theinquirer. Some account of the main currents of thought inthis department can be gathered, I venture to hope, from thefollowing pages.COTETSCHAPTER PAGE
 
I. Hebrew Literary Methods 3II. Legalistic Interpretation 14HI. The Triumph of Allegory 33IV. Scholasticism Dominant ^gV. Luther's Appeal ^3VI. Protest and Reaction 84VII. Attempt of the Federal School 94VIII. Rise of a More Historical View 102IX. The Influence of Pietism 112X. Endeavors after a Biblical Theology 120XI. The Bishop's Problem 128XII. The Significance of Wellhausen 136XIII. Historical Interpretation 143I. THE PLACE of WORSHIP I44II. sacrificial WORSHIP 1 49m. THE priesthood 153IV. ORIGIALITY OF THE PROPHETS 1 58V. Sm AD ATOEMET 161XTV.-SoME Survivals i68XV. Apocalyptic Vagaries 176
 
Bibliographical ote 193Index 195ESSAYS I BIBLICALITERPRETATIOLITERARY METHODSWith an ancient book we need to enter intoauthor's mind. This means that we must know hisenviroment, his habits of thought, and his purpose.For one thing itis pointed out that the ancient author was so careless of hisreputation that he took no pains to attach his name to hiswork. Unless Ezekiel be an exception, no one of the OldTestament writers is known to us by name. To us, to whomthe fame of authorship is dear, this is almost incomprehensible.We should place the crown of laurel on the head of the poetof the book of Job as readily as we place it on the brow of the poet of the Iliad. He has cheated us of the opportunity,and himself of a monument more enduring than bronze, bypreserving his anonymity. Moreover, when the Bible is pre-sented to us as an authoritative code we are tempted to think that its authorship should be certified in some official way.A Protestant theologian advanced the theory that the variousbooks of the Old Testament as soon as they were written wereposted in a conspicuous place in the temple that all the peoplemight take knowledge of them, and that when sufficient oppor-tunity had been given they were taken down by the priestsand carefully preserved in the archives. eedless to say, thetheory has no support in the documents themselves, which areas careless about notarial authorization as they are about

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