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P. 1
Being by Doing and Trying to Do.

Being by Doing and Trying to Do.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
by NAHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.



The best and surest power in every person is that which
springs from what they are— from their essential nature.
And because it does come from their nature, they can not
get outside of it, to estimate or understand it. What we
are in our essential natures we can not tell, since we can
only estimate ourselves by our own thought; and hence
there is at last that power of thought which estimates, left
unestimated. And every person, when driven, in defense
of his convictions, from his remotest inferences inward to
his centre of certainty, is compelled to say, "It is so be-
cause it is so ;" or, rather, " It is so because I am what I am."
by NAHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.



The best and surest power in every person is that which
springs from what they are— from their essential nature.
And because it does come from their nature, they can not
get outside of it, to estimate or understand it. What we
are in our essential natures we can not tell, since we can
only estimate ourselves by our own thought; and hence
there is at last that power of thought which estimates, left
unestimated. And every person, when driven, in defense
of his convictions, from his remotest inferences inward to
his centre of certainty, is compelled to say, "It is so be-
cause it is so ;" or, rather, " It is so because I am what I am."

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Oct 21, 2013
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BEIG BY DOIG AD TRYIG TO DO.by AHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.The best and surest power in every person is that whichsprings from what they are— from their essential nature.And because it does come from their nature, they can notget outside of it, to estimate or understand it. What weare in our essential natures we can not tell, since we canonly estimate ourselves by our own thought; and hencethere is at last that power of thought which estimates, leftunestimated. And every person, when driven, in defenseof his convictions, from his remotest inferences inward tohis centre of certainty, is compelled to say, "It is so be-cause it is so ;" or, rather, " It is so because I am what I am."I have a given belief: the reason I give for it is some ante-rior belief; and the reason for that some other still anterior,and so on until at last we come to the end of the series — tosome first belief, of which no proof can be given. Or, if wetrace any given experience inward through the narrowing,concentric circles of certitude, we come finally to our firstand deepest experience, which has no other to rest on.Hence there is a centre of nature in us all, about which ourcharacters crystallize, from which our constant personal in-fluence radiates, of which we must be unconscious exceptas others wonder at it or testify to its power. And yet it isthis very power, which springs from our nature as easily aswaters from a fall, and accomplishes results as easily as watersDigitized byGoogle /
 
1 82 SELECTIOS.cany mill-wheels in falling;, it is this power, of which we |think least because we know least, that constitutes our realworth and occasions our real usefulness. Our actual strengthis hidden in unconsciousness, beyond the reach of pride orthe most morbid self-inspection. Through the alchemy of experience the special things for which we strive are trans-muted into the gold of reality, and are buried in the founda-tions of our life. And only as our special efforts and im-pulses become fixed habits of activity do they become apart of ourselves — do they become ourselves. But then,when they have become habits, they no longer surprise us,they no longer satisfy ovu* aspiration, because we know andthink nothing further of them. So long as we can do agiven thing only occasionally in choice moods and favorablecircumstances, we take pride in it ; we ask others to see usdo it ; we expect them to wonder at it when done. Yet solong as the doing of it is thus occasional, it is uncertain, andnot a part of our own nature, upon which God and mancan rely for permanent results. But by and by, throughconstant repetition, it becomes a habit, and then we think nothing of it ; then we count upon it as a part of our relia-ble resources, and straightway use it for practical purposes,and begin to strive for some new thing which is difficultand almost impossible.When the pianist begins his practice, he is glad if he canplay passages of eighth, sixteenth, or thirty-second notes; buteventually he will run a sweet stream of chromatics acrosseight octaves, and trill half a thousand quavers a minute,and yet think no more of it than a scholar thinks of thealphabet while reading Shakespeare or Milton. This capa-city of the pianist becomes not only second nature, butnature to him ; and while we marvel at the rapidity of hisDigitized
 
by GoogleBEIG BY DOIG AD TRYIG TO DO. 1 83execution, he marvels that we think it wonderful And soit is through the entire range of our capacities. It is whatwe are that tells permanently on others; and it is striving tobe what we are not, which makes us what we are. We areat this moment the sum of our habits. The true responseof man's nature to God*s fidelity is habit. The legitimateresult of law acting on free-will is habitual obedience. Butwe are made so that we can not find satisfaction in what weare; we are not conscious of its worth, it seems so natural;we are satisfied only by becoming something more; weget a knowledge of our present attainment only as we tryits capacity for new attainment, A merchant knows httleof his real power by the routine of business which has be-come nature t6 him. Only when he measures himself bysome new enterprise, some enlarged endeavor, does he getan idea of what he is and what he can do.Oh ! how wonderful is this power of the soul to absorband appropriate through experience the highest possibledevelopments, and to transform them into the nerve andfibre of our being — to sink them in the foundations of stillhigher growth. Consider how blank is the mind and soulof each babe! Weaker in muscle and more helpless ininstinct than the young of animals, it knows not that ithears with the ear, or sees with the eye, or smells with thenose; conscious only of varied impressions, received it knowsnot how nor whence. But from birth there begins thisexperience, repeated over and over thousands, millionsof times, until it acquires habits of hearing, seeing,smelling, tasting, feeling, willing, loving, aspiring, whichbecome henceforth his own nature, and can not be taken

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