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The Joy of Jesus.

The Joy of Jesus.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
by NAHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.


The men of the New Testament were men of joy. They
differ from those of the Old Testament only in this : their
joy is too deep for words ; too quiet and all-pervading to
be wholly spoken, even in worship ; for a great joy, like a
great sorrow, craves silence and mocks at words. All tiie
higher emotions require a still and quiet heart for their
home ; else they stay but a short time in one place.
by NAHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.


The men of the New Testament were men of joy. They
differ from those of the Old Testament only in this : their
joy is too deep for words ; too quiet and all-pervading to
be wholly spoken, even in worship ; for a great joy, like a
great sorrow, craves silence and mocks at words. All tiie
higher emotions require a still and quiet heart for their
home ; else they stay but a short time in one place.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Oct 21, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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THE JOY OF JESUS.by AHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.The men of the ew Testament were men of joy. Theydiffer from those of the Old Testament only in this : their joy is too deep for words ; too quiet and all-pervading tobe wholly spoken, even in worship ; for a great joy, like agreat sorrow, craves silence and mocks at words. All tiiehigher emotions require a still and quiet heart for theirhome ; else they stay but a short time in one place.Some people use joy all up at once in a grand illumina-tion of impulse that leaves the night cold and dark-;— so dothe Methodists. Others use it as we do coal — ^put it in theheart of the furnace, and silently warm the whole housewith it — ^so did the Quakers. Such is the ew Testament joy — a silent, all-pervading gladness, which warmed into lifeevery noble and manly quality. A joy hid in the very rootsof tlie tree of life ; but making all its sap sweet, its trunk firm, its boughs graceful, its leaf green, and its firuit rich andmellow.Do you think that Jesus was never glad nor happy ;never felt his whole soul thrilled with holy joy ? He whosesoul was all music; whose lips poured out melody likewine; whose spirit played on every string of the humanheart ; whose eye missed no touch of beauty, from the lilythat glorified the grass to the lightning that leaped from onepart of the heaven unto the other I Is it possible for a soulDigitizedd by Google.
 
THE JOY OF JESUS. 1 99to be SO entirely in harmony with the universe and its God,so sensitive to the touch of spirit-fingers, and yet benothing but a " man of sorrows" ? I think not. You saythat he sorrowed for sin as none other, and felt the wicked-ness of the world as none other. True; but did he not alsosee more virtue and moral beauty than ever blessed a mortaleye ? We should have mourned over Magdalene as only alost one ; but he saw so much good in her to rejoice in, thathe said, "either do I condemn thee." We look uponprodigals as objects for our tears only; but he heard themusic and dancing which would celebrate his return, evenwhile he was feeding on swine-husks. \Ve should have lostalt patience with the vacillations of Peter and the rest ; theyseemed only to endear them to him.I tell you that no man can look upon this universe asJesus did and not be happy. His biographers have natu-rally given only the severe, missionary side of his life. Butthere was another side, a rich, sunny side, to it, which wewould as gladly know. He certainly enjoyed social life.He went to a wedding of his friend and countryman, andmade him a present of the best wine. He was oftenasked out to dine, even with the Roman officers and sinners,and he always went. At evening, when the day's teachingwas over, he walked out to Bethany, to spend the night withMary, and Martha, and Lazarus. Was there no rejoicingthere ? o recounting the experiences of the day ? o realhuman enjoyment of the home curcle ? o real friendly talk,as between men and women ? It would be a libel upon himand his doctrine to say so. And besides, we have conclusiveevidence that he wore a smiling face in this — that childrenloved him and went to him, and he took them up in hisarms. ow, children know who loVe them and who do not.
 
Digitizedby Google200 SELECTIOS.and they know a happy face from an unhappy one. Thosechildren who wanted to get near to Jesus, and sit on hisknee, couldn't have been hired or whipped to go to JohnCalvin, or Jonathan Edwards, or Dr. Emmons. Think of a litde child wanting to go to such ministers as we knewwhen we were children, and especially when they were inthe very act of teaching, with all their chiurch membersaround them ; when their faces were strung up to the tensionof infant damnation; "knittmg their brows like gatheringstorm " I Jesus was no such man. There was no glare of awful dogma in his eye, no tone of vengeance in his voice,else he would never have been the children's friend. Theyfelt drawn to him, and he to them. We can just guess withwhat a yearning he pressed them to his heart, rejoicing inspirit that, though God had hid the everlasting truth from thewise and prudent, he had revealed it unto babes. He musthave loved children, or they would not have loved him. If he did love them, he must have been happy as often as hesaw their bright and trustful faces greeting him like a fresh** Good morning " from God.Digitizedby Google 1

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