Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Life Which Now is.

The Life Which Now is.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
by NAHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.




The true condition of growth is fixedness and fidelity in
the present condition. The best way to become a perfect
,man is to be a perfect child. The only hope of being able
to think, and speak, and understand, as a man or a woman,
lies in our first understanding, thinking, and speaking as a
boy or girl. This thought is getting to be the conviction
of the world more and more. It is the undertone of mo-
rality in all the best moods of the day. It is the direct
teaching of the best poetry.
by NAHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.




The true condition of growth is fixedness and fidelity in
the present condition. The best way to become a perfect
,man is to be a perfect child. The only hope of being able
to think, and speak, and understand, as a man or a woman,
lies in our first understanding, thinking, and speaking as a
boy or girl. This thought is getting to be the conviction
of the world more and more. It is the undertone of mo-
rality in all the best moods of the day. It is the direct
teaching of the best poetry.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Oct 21, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/21/2013

pdf

text

original

 
THE LIFE WHICH OW IS.by AHOR AUGUSTUS STAPLES.The true condition of growth is fixedness and fidelity inthe present condition. The best way to become a perfect,man is to be a perfect child. The only hope of being ableto think, and speak, and understand, as a man or a woman,lies in our first understanding, thinking, and speaking as aboy or girl. This thought is getting to be the convictionof the world more and more. It is the undertone of mo-rality in all the best moods of the day. It is the directteaching of the best poetry. Tennyson, the Brownings,Whittier, Lowell, Longfellow, and the rest imite in a grandresolve that," Henceforth my heart shall sigh no moreFor olden time and holier shore ;God's love and blessing then and thereAre now, and here, and everywhere."And I believe that the pulpit-teaching of all live men wasnever so harmonious as at the present hour upon this sub- ject : that the true way of possessing the future is throughfidelity to the present ; and that the old method of teachingmen to spend this life in looking away firom it, either for-ward or backward, is simply mischievous. Concerning theold dogmas, the Hve and inspired men of all sects are say-ing, as Jesus said to the disciple, " Let the dead bury theDigitizedby Google
 
THE LIFE WHICH OW IS. 205dead," while we follow the Truth. The Church of Eng-land is honeycombed with men who are saying, virtually," When the church was a child, it spake as a child, it thoughtas a child, it understood as a child ; now it has become aman, and it must put away childish things." And the sameis true of every church that has a history. Hard by everyold school there are a dozen new schools, as by every stumpwhere last year stood an old, fruitless tree, this year stands ascore of sprouts, withy and succulent with the new life of theroot. The true law of growth is this : each human soul isrooted in a given condition, where birth, or accident, ornecessity places it. Its roots spread out into all thepossible relations of that condition-^love of father andmother, brother and sister, neighbor and friend, work andplay, wealth and comfort. Some condition of this kindevery human being is placed in at birth, and through thathe is to grow into all that he can rightfully attain. ow,the old method of enlarging one's life was to pull it up bythe roots, through miraculous conversion, and transplant itto a new soil. The consequence was, that the greater por-tion dried up, and became dead to the age and its interests.The natural way is to remain in this soil of nature — thiscondition of necessity — and from that centre strike rootsoutward to the richest soils, and downward to the deepestsprings. God has placed no being in a barren soil ; no onewhere he may not find the elements of immortal life ; nonewhere, through perfect fidelity to its condition, its roots maynot reach out to embrace the earth, and spread out branchesand leaves to heal and overshadow it. Thus, CharlotteBronte's life was like an acorn dropped in the cleft of arock — a condition as hard as infelicity could make it. Fora time, its lateral growth was choked by its grim surround-
 
DigitizedbyG00gl(:206 SELECTIOS,ings ; but at last its roots struck down so deep that theyunderran the rock, and then reached outward to enrichthemselves from the treasures of the whole earth. Andthus it may be with every life, if it is perfecdy faithful andtrue to the condition in which it is placed. It may growoutward into the possession of all that remains for the chil-dren of God.The figure which Paul uses to illustrate this truth is anuncommonly happy one. It is literally true and figura-tively true. It is correct as a rule for the training of chil-dren; correct also as an illustration of the true law of growth for individuals, institutions, and nations. A perfectchild is one that speaks, and understands, and thinks as achild. If you teach a child to speak, and understand, andthink like a man, you make him neither man nor child, buta sort of human parrot. If you allow his healthy hungerfor what is above him to run on before his capacity, andtaste here and there a little of every thing, before he has thestrength to comprehend any thing, you have destroyed thatpeculiar charm and felicity of childhood, namely, its yronderand aspiration. In its stead you have not a man, but akind of moral and intellectual Tom Thumb, indiflferent, stu-pid, and superficial, and indisposed to believe that there canbe any thing new or wonderful. othing can be so sad as thisforestalling of the thought and speech of childhood, not withmanliness and womanliness, but with manhishness and wo-manishness. One sometimes sees a lad of ten or twelve sum-mers with the air of the Roman emperor who offered a king-dom to the man that would invent for him a new pleasure.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->