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The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie, by Andrew Carnegie

The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie, by Andrew Carnegie

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Published by Carnegie1919
Entrepreneur and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) was born in Scotland and emigrated to America as a teenager. His Carnegie Steel Company launched the steel industry in Pittsburgh, and after its sale to J.P. Morgan, he devoted his life to philanthropic causes. His charitable organizations built more than 2,500 public libraries around the world, and gave away more than $350 million during his lifetime.
Entrepreneur and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) was born in Scotland and emigrated to America as a teenager. His Carnegie Steel Company launched the steel industry in Pittsburgh, and after its sale to J.P. Morgan, he devoted his life to philanthropic causes. His charitable organizations built more than 2,500 public libraries around the world, and gave away more than $350 million during his lifetime.

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Published by: Carnegie1919 on Jul 31, 2009
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AUTOBIOGRAPHY
OF
ANDREW CARNEGIE
 
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS
 LondonCONSTABLE & CO. L
IMITED
1920COPYRIGHT, 1920, BY LOUISE WHITFIELD CARNEGIEALL RIGHTS RESERVED
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The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie, by Andrew Carnegie...file:///E:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Administrator/Desktop/carnegie...1 of 2287/31/2009 11:30 AM
 
A
PREFACE
FTER 
retiring from active business my husband yielded to the earnest solicitationsof friends, both here and in Great Britain, and began to jot down from time to timerecollections of his early days. He soon found, however, that instead of the leisure heexpected, his life was more occupied with affairs than ever before, and the writing of these memoirs was reserved for his play-time in Scotland. For a few weeks each summer we retired to our little bungalow on the moors at Aultnagar to enjoy the simple life, and itwas there that Mr. Carnegie did most of his writing. He delighted in going back to thoseearly times, and as he wrote he lived them all over again. He was thus engaged in July,1914, when the war clouds began to gather, and when the fateful news of the 4th of August reached us, we immediately left our retreat in the hills and returned to Skibo to bemore in touch with the situation.These memoirs ended at that time. Henceforth he was never able to interest himself in private affairs. Many times he made the attempt to continue writing, but found it useless.Until then he had lived the life of a man in middle life—and a young one at that—golfing,fishing, swimming each day, sometimes doing all three in one day. Optimist as he alwayswas and tried to be, even in the face of the failure of his hopes, the world disaster was toomuch. His heart was broken. A severe attack of influenza followed by two serious attacksof pneumonia precipitated old age upon him.It was said of a contemporary who passed away a few months before Mr. Carnegie that"he never could have borne the burden of old age." Perhaps the most inspiring part of Mr.Carnegie's life, to those who were privileged to know it intimately, was the way he borehis "burden of old age." Always patient, considerate, cheerful, grateful for any little pleasure or service, never thinking of himself, but always of the dawning of the better day, his spirit ever shone brighter and brighter until "he was not, for God took him."Written with his own hand on the fly-leaf of his manuscript are these words: "It is probable that material for a small volume might be collected from these memoirs whichthe public would care to read, and that a private and larger volume might please myrelatives and friends. Much I have written from time to time may, I think, wisely beomitted. Whoever arranges these notes should be careful not to burden the public withtoo much. A man with a heart as well as a head should be chosen."Who, then, could so well fill this description as our friend Professor John C. Van Dyke?When the manuscript was shown to him, he remarked, without having read Mr.Carnegie's notation, "It would be a labor of love to prepare this for publication." Here,then, the choice was mutual, and the manner in which he has performed this "labor" proves the wisdom of the choice—a choice made and carried out in the name of a rareand beautiful friendship.L
OUISE
W
HITFIELD
C
ARNEGIE
 New York  April 16, 1920
EDITOR'S NOTE
The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie, by Andrew Carnegie...file:///E:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Administrator/Desktop/carnegie...2 of 2287/31/2009 11:30 AM
 
T
HE
story of a man's life, especially when it is told by the man himself, should not beinterrupted by the hecklings of an editor. He should be allowed to tell the tale in hisown way, and enthusiasm, even extravagance in recitation should be received as a part of the story. The quality of the man may underlie exuberance of spirit, as truth may be foundin apparent exaggeration. Therefore, in preparing these chapters for publication the editor has done little more than arrange the material chronologically and sequentially so that thenarrative might run on unbrokenly to the end. Some footnotes by way of explanation,some illustrations that offer sight-help to the text, have been added; but the narrative isthe thing.This is neither the time nor the place to characterize or eulogize the maker of "this strangeeventful history," but perhaps it is worth while to recognize that the history really waseventful. And strange. Nothing stranger ever came out of the
 Arabian Nights
than thestory of this poor Scotch boy who came to America and step by step, through many trialsand triumphs, became the great steel master, built up a colossal industry, amassed anenormous fortune, and then deliberately and systematically gave away the whole of it for the enlightenment and betterment of mankind. Not only that. He established a gospel of wealth that can be neither ignored nor forgotten, and set a pace in distribution thatsucceeding millionaires have followed as a precedent. In the course of his career he became a nation-builder, a leader in thought, a writer, a speaker, the friend of workmen,schoolmen, and statesmen, the associate of both the lowly and the lofty. But these weremerely interesting happenings in his life as compared with his great inspirations—hisdistribution of wealth, his passion for world peace, and his love for mankind.Perhaps we are too near this history to see it in proper proportions, but in the time tocome it should gain in perspective and in interest. The generations hereafter may realizethe wonder of it more fully than we of to-day. Happily it is preserved to us, and that, too,in Mr. Carnegie's own words and in his own buoyant style. It is a very memorablerecord—a record perhaps the like of which we shall not look upon again.J
OHN
C. V
AN
D
YKE
 New York  August, 1920
CONTENTS
I.P
ARENTS
 
AND
C
HILDHOOD
1II.D
UNFERMLINE
 
AND
A
MERICA
20III.P
ITTSBURGH
 
AND
W
ORK 
32IV.C
OLONEL
A
 NDERSON
 
AND
B
OOKS
45V.T
HE
T
ELEGRAPH
O
FFICE
54VI.
AILROAD
S
ERVICE
65VII.S
UPERINTENDENT
 
OF
 
THE
P
ENNSYLVANIA
84VIII.C
IVIL
W
AR 
P
ERIOD
99
The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie, by Andrew Carnegie...file:///E:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Administrator/Desktop/carnegie...3 of 2287/31/2009 11:30 AM

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