Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
HAMAN'S PLOT AGAINST THE JEWS.pdf

HAMAN'S PLOT AGAINST THE JEWS.pdf

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY J. R. MILLER


ESTHER III., 1-11; IV., 10 TO V., 3 229

"We do not know what Haman had done to win
the king's favor. He was rich, and possibly had
been liberal with his gifts to the king. For some
reason, at least, the king wished Haman honored,
and wherever he went every one bowed down to
him— everybody but one man. Mordecai did no
reverence to the proud vizier. Mordecai was a
Jew and Haman was an Amakelite— hence prob-
ably the bitter enmity between these two men.
BY J. R. MILLER


ESTHER III., 1-11; IV., 10 TO V., 3 229

"We do not know what Haman had done to win
the king's favor. He was rich, and possibly had
been liberal with his gifts to the king. For some
reason, at least, the king wished Haman honored,
and wherever he went every one bowed down to
him— everybody but one man. Mordecai did no
reverence to the proud vizier. Mordecai was a
Jew and Haman was an Amakelite— hence prob-
ably the bitter enmity between these two men.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Oct 27, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/27/2013

pdf

text

original

 
HAMAN'S PLOT AGAINST THE JEWSBY J. R. MILLER Read Esther III., 1-11; IV., 10 to V., 3The Book of Esther opens a window into Orien-tal life. It shows us also something of the sad-ness and debasement of woman's condition inthose days. At first thought Esther seems to havehad an enviable experience in being chosen be-cause of her beauty to be the queen of Xerxes.But when we understand better what her positionreally was we see that she was not to be envied,but pitied rather. Esther's story in the light of Christianity is a sad one. Nor can we hold herup as an ideal woman. Yet there is value in thestudy of her story, as it shows by contrast whatChristianity has done for woman.The book in its introduction tells the story of the deposing of Vashti, the former queen. Oursympathies are with the wronged queen. We canhave only condemnation and contempt for theking. We learn also how it was undertaken tofind another beautiful woman to take Vashti 'splace. In all the provinces of the kingdom thefairest virgin was sought for the king. Esther228ESTHER III., 1-11; IV., 10 TO V., 3 229appeared to win a great prize, but no lowly Chris-tian girl to-day would want to exchange placeswith her.
 
Mordecai is the real hero of the Book of Es-ther and the deliverer of the Jews. Not much istold of him. He was of the tribe of Benjamin.He was a captive and lived in Shushan, or Susa,the Persian capital. Esther had been brought upby Mordecai as his own child. Yet Esther wasforbidden to reveal in the palace either her rela-tion to Mordecai or her nationality. Mordecaiwas in close communication with the palace. Hediscovered a plot against the king and defeatedit, his name being recorded in the chronicles."We do not know what Haman had done to winthe king's favor. He was rich, and possibly hadbeen liberal with his gifts to the king. For somereason, at least, the king wished Haman honored,and wherever he went every one bowed down tohim— everybody but one man. Mordecai did noreverence to the proud vizier. Mordecai was aJew and Haman was an Amakelite— hence prob-ably the bitter enmity between these two men.All the attendants and courtiers did honor to thegrand vizier as he passed backward and forward —all except this Jew, who refused to bend theknee to him. Haman, writhing under the insultcontinually repeated, determined upon revengeand conspired to kill not Mordecai only, but allthe Jews in the realm. He obtained the king's sig-nature to the decree, and it was promulgated and230 HAMAN'S PLOT AGAINST THE JEWSthe time fixed for the extermination of the hatedrace. Mordecai sent to Esther a copy of the edict,informing her of the plot, and charged her to goin unto the king and plead for her people.
 
Esther reminded Mordecai at once of the diffi-culties in the way. She referred to the customobserved in such matters. "All the king's serv-ants ... do know, that whosoever, whetherman or woman, shall come unto the king into theinner court, who is not called, there is one law forhim, that he be put to death." The only personsadmitted to the king were those for whom he him-self sent, and Esther had not been invited. "Ihave not been called to come in unto the kingthese thirty days." The fact that she had notbeen invited to come for so long a time was dis-heartening. "There must be some reason for it,"she thought. Esther would better not havestopped at all to think about these difficulties inthe way. Considering the perils in our way isapt to make us grow faint-hearted. Ofttimes, asit proved in Esther's case, the perils will vanishif we go forward.Mordecai was not disposed to release Estherfrom her obligation. So he sent a messenger re-minding her that her own life was in bond inthis matter. "Think not with thyself that thoushalt escape in the king's house, more than allthe Jews." She might meet death if she ven-tured into the king's presence ; certainly she wouldmeet death if she sat still where she was and didESTHER in., 1-11; IV., 10 TO V., 3 231nothing. She was one of those upon whom thesentence had been pronounced in the king's de-cree, and even the palace and the royal robes shewore would not protect her. Many people hesi-tate to come to Christ. They fear He will not re-ceive them. They think it will be hard to live aChristian life. They count the crosses, the self-

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->