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Table Of Contents

Politics and publication
Buddhism and society
Oaths and oathing
Anti-Buddhist attitudes
Court religion
Te mythology of rule
Te noble clans
Tibet’s military culture and the comitatus
Te Tibetan court in context
Conclusions
Methodological observations
Endnotes
Language, ethnicity, and the Sino-Tibetan ‘Teory’
Tibet’s honorifc language
sku bla
A brief excursus on the concepts lha chos and myi chos
Oathing rites, cup rites
Confession rites
Te Bon tradition
Why Avalokiteśvara?
Gtsug lag
A “Mountain cult” in the Imperium, and afer?
Cakravartins in Tibet
Nongs
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Walter, Michael L. - Buddhism and Empire (345p).pdf

Walter, Michael L. - Buddhism and Empire (345p).pdf

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Published by ShakyaShribhadra
This book convincingly reassesses the role of political institutions in the introduction of Buddhism under the Tibetan Empire (c. 620-842), showing how relationships formed in the Imperial period underlie many of the unique characteristics of traditional Tibetan Buddhism. Taking original sources as a point of departure, the author persuasively argues that later sources hitherto used for the history of early Tibetan Buddhism in fact project later ideas backward, thus distorting our view of its enculturation.
Following the pattern of Buddhism’s spread elsewhere in Asia, the early Tibetan imperial court realized how useful normative Buddhist concepts were.
This work clearly shows that, while some beliefs and practices per se changed after the Tibetan Empire, the model of socio-political-religious leadership developed in that earlier period survived its demise and still constitutes a significant element in contemporary Tibetan Buddhist religious culture.
This book convincingly reassesses the role of political institutions in the introduction of Buddhism under the Tibetan Empire (c. 620-842), showing how relationships formed in the Imperial period underlie many of the unique characteristics of traditional Tibetan Buddhism. Taking original sources as a point of departure, the author persuasively argues that later sources hitherto used for the history of early Tibetan Buddhism in fact project later ideas backward, thus distorting our view of its enculturation.
Following the pattern of Buddhism’s spread elsewhere in Asia, the early Tibetan imperial court realized how useful normative Buddhist concepts were.
This work clearly shows that, while some beliefs and practices per se changed after the Tibetan Empire, the model of socio-political-religious leadership developed in that earlier period survived its demise and still constitutes a significant element in contemporary Tibetan Buddhist religious culture.

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Published by: ShakyaShribhadra on Oct 28, 2013
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10/29/2013

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