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Report on Co-Packing for Brooklyn Food Manufacturers

Report on Co-Packing for Brooklyn Food Manufacturers

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Published by Stephen Levin
For those of us interested in good food, there is no better place to live than New York City.
Increasingly -- thanks to food manufacturers from the City expanding their businesses -- more and more amazing food products that you could once only get here can now be enjoyed across the country. Brooklyn has been responsible for much of this output and has, over the past few years, been the home to an explosion of local, artisanal food manufacturers who are making a name for themselves not only in New York, but nationally and even globally.

Yet, despite the boom of the Brooklyn food manufacturing industry, I consistently hear from small business owners leading this food movement that they are having difficulty expanding their businesses. There is a demand for more of their products and a desire for their businesses to grow, but there have not always been good answers as to how to make that happen. Brooklyn food manufacturers are outgrowing their current facilities, have limited access to kitchen space and appropriate equipment, or are simply unable to find a manufacturing space that suits their needs.

In order to help meet the needs of Brooklyn food manufacturers -- business leaders who play a vital role in our local economy -- my office has worked with organizations like the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, Pratt Center for Community Development, and the East Williamsburg Valley Industrial Development Corporation, along with government partners like Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, Assemblyman Joe Lentol, the office of NYC Council Speaker Christine Quinn, and the Economic Development Corporation to explore new ideas that can help build on the growth of the industry thus far. This report explores one such idea: a Brooklyn based co-packing facility that can be utilized by food manufacturers from across the borough.

The Brooklyn food manufacturing industry is strong. Whether it is through the introduction of a co-packing facility or the implementation of other innovative ideas, we can make it even stronger. I am proud to work alongside the food manufacturers of Brooklyn and am excited to see how the industry can thrive as we continue to work together.
For those of us interested in good food, there is no better place to live than New York City.
Increasingly -- thanks to food manufacturers from the City expanding their businesses -- more and more amazing food products that you could once only get here can now be enjoyed across the country. Brooklyn has been responsible for much of this output and has, over the past few years, been the home to an explosion of local, artisanal food manufacturers who are making a name for themselves not only in New York, but nationally and even globally.

Yet, despite the boom of the Brooklyn food manufacturing industry, I consistently hear from small business owners leading this food movement that they are having difficulty expanding their businesses. There is a demand for more of their products and a desire for their businesses to grow, but there have not always been good answers as to how to make that happen. Brooklyn food manufacturers are outgrowing their current facilities, have limited access to kitchen space and appropriate equipment, or are simply unable to find a manufacturing space that suits their needs.

In order to help meet the needs of Brooklyn food manufacturers -- business leaders who play a vital role in our local economy -- my office has worked with organizations like the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, Pratt Center for Community Development, and the East Williamsburg Valley Industrial Development Corporation, along with government partners like Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, Assemblyman Joe Lentol, the office of NYC Council Speaker Christine Quinn, and the Economic Development Corporation to explore new ideas that can help build on the growth of the industry thus far. This report explores one such idea: a Brooklyn based co-packing facility that can be utilized by food manufacturers from across the borough.

The Brooklyn food manufacturing industry is strong. Whether it is through the introduction of a co-packing facility or the implementation of other innovative ideas, we can make it even stronger. I am proud to work alongside the food manufacturers of Brooklyn and am excited to see how the industry can thrive as we continue to work together.

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Published by: Stephen Levin on Oct 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/10/2014

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STEPHEN T. LEVIN
NEW YORK CITYCOUNCIL MEMBER
33RD DISTRICT,BROOKLYN
OCTOBER 28, 2013
CO-PACKING
fOR BROOKLYNfOOD mANufACTuReRS
RePORT ON
 
C0-PACKING
For Brooklyn Food Manufacturers
CONTRIBuTORS
1
ADDITIONAL CONTRIBuTORS:
Harry Rosenblum, Eric Demby, Chris Woehrle, Kari Morris,Miquela Craytor, Lydia Downing, Alissa Weiss, Hunter Goldman, Katie Codey, Monica Foskett,Andrew Steininger, Carlo Scissura and Cailtin Dourmashkin
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LEAD PLC ER
CARINA GARCIA
PLC ER
BeNeDICT JOSON
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mATT OJALA
EDR
AShLeY ThOmPSON
EDR
ANTONIO m. RODRIGuez
REPR DESG & LA

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