Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Princetonian_1984-11-29_v108_n122_0001 (2)

Princetonian_1984-11-29_v108_n122_0001 (2)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 11,191|Likes:
Published by Tim Cavanaugh

More info:

Published by: Tim Cavanaugh on Oct 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/31/2014

pdf

text

original

 
The
Daily
PRINCETONIAN
ol.
CVm,
No.
122
The
Daily
Princetonian,
Thursday,
November
29,
1984
©1984
20
Cents
Politics
dept.
to
consider
limiting
size
Panel
to
review
recommendations
By
MICHAEL
FOX
The
politics
department
undergraduatecommittee
will
meet
today
to
discuss
strategies
for
cop-
ing
with
a
perceived
problem
of
severe
overcrowding
in
the
depart-
ment.
The
committee
is
considering
several
recommendations
includingtightening
of
requirements
for
en-
trance
into
the
department
and,
as
a
last
resort,restricting
thenumber
of
politics
concentrators.
Therecommendationscome
in
response
to
an
increase
in
politicsconcentrators.
Last
spring
the
politics
department
became
Princeton's
most
popular
depart-
ment,
with
121
students
entering
the
department
an
increase
of
40
over
the
previous
year.
The
recommendations
of
the
committee
which
is
composed
of
nine
student-elected
undergraduates
from
the
department
and
five
facul-
ty
members
are
not
final.
Overworked,
underpaid
"There
is
no
question
that
politics
professors
have
been
over-
burdened,"
professor
Michael
Danielson,
chairman
of
the
depart-
ment,said.
The
increase
in
politics
majors
has
led
to
problems
injunior
andsenioradvising,
precept
over-
crowding
and
strains
on
the
faculty,
according
to
committee
members.
"For
the
junior
faculty
this
is
potentially
disastrous,
for
thesenior
faculty
it
is
more
than
annoy-
ing,"
said
committeemember
pro-
fessor
Walter
Murphy,pointing
out
that
tenure
committees
don't
take
into
account
advising
burdens
and
that
faculty
are
judged
by
national
standards.
The
overcrowding,
Murphy
add-
ed,hasalso
made
it
harder
for
the
faculty
to
do
research.
Although
committee
members
asserted
that
proposals
are
only
at
a
preliminary
stage,
some
ideas
which
Black
students,
university
debate
closed
meeting
policy
By
JOHN
HURLEY
A
group
of
black
students
has
clashed
with
administrators
over
whether
officially
recognized
stu-
dent
organizations
can
hold
meetings
open
only
to
minority
students.
What
first
ignitedthe
conflict
was
a
proposal
by
the
Mathey
Col-
lege
Black
Students
Table
to
hold
a
closed
meeting
in
October
to
discuss
whatmembers
describe
as
"sen-
sitive"
issues
facing
minority
students
at
Princeton,such
as
inter-
racial
dating
andassimilation
into
white
society.
Rejection
The
university
opposedthe
pro-
posal,
contending
that
it
was
incon-
sistent
with
official
policy
that
for-
bidsorganizations
from
advertising
closed
meetings.
Thedispute
took
on
newpropor-
tions
last
night
when
the
students
brought
the
issue
before
the
USG
Race
Relations
committee,
and
earlier
this
week
gained
the
endorse-
ment
of
the
TWC
governance
board
for
their
position.
Thedispute
has
generated
a
str-
ing
of
meetings
between
students,
staff
andadministrators
and
has
pitted
Mathey
College
Master
Nan-
cy
Weiss
andDean
of
Students
Eugene
Lowe
'71,
whorejected
the
proposal,
against
members
of
the
Black
Students
Table
and
the
TWC.
Weiss
and
members
of
the
Black
Students
Table
said
yesterday
thatboth
sidesagree
that
minority
students
should
have
the
right
to
have
closed
meetingsand
should
have
access
to
some
university
facilities
for
those
meetings.
avid
Jackson
'87
Cites
insensitivity
Reagan
aide
defends
human
rights
record
By
CAROL
CARDINALE
and
JULIE
ANN
SOSA
"Acts
of
abstention
are
the
real
evils.
We
must
jump
inand
grapple
withthe
human
rights
issue,"
said
Elliott
Abrams,
assistant
secretary
of
state
for
human
rightsand
humanitarianaffairs
in
the
Reagan
Administration,
yesterday
at
the
Woodrow
Wilson
School.
Citing
a
perceived
attempt
by
the
Carter
White
House
to
curb
U.S.
involvement
overseas,
Abrams
elaborated
on
the
Reagan
Ad-
ministration's
"two-track
policy."
"Our
short
range
goalis
to
be
able
to
react
to
crises.
Our
long
range
goal
is
Madisonian
to
pro-
mote
democracy
and
thus
treat
the
symptoms,
rather
than
the
disease
communism,"
Abrams
told
the
audience
of
about
70
students
and
faculty.
Precursor
According
to
Abrams,
current
policy
is
modeled
afterthat
developed
by
then-UnitedNations
Ambassador
Daniel
Moynihan
ow
senator
from
New
York
and
thelate
Sen.
Henry
Jackson,
with
whom
Abrams
and
U.N.
envoy
Jeanne
Kirkpatrick
previously
worked.
"The
moral
imperative
of
Reagan
policy
is
to
resist
Soviet
ex-
pansion
and
influence,"
Abrams
said.
Policy
is
a
blend
of
American
idealism
and
realworld
pragmatism,
he
added.
"Our
human
rightsgoal
cannot
be
purity;
we
don't
live
in
a
Utopia,"
Abrams
insisted.Fielding
a
question
about
apar-
theid,
Abramsdefendedthe
current
administration'sfailure
to
press
for
American
disinvestment
in
South
African
concerns.
It
is
not
the
prac-
tical
approach,
he
said.
"We
must
use
an
economiclever
to
give
blackSouth
Africans
more
control
through
more
industrializa-
tion,"
Abramsexplained.
Throw
the
spitball
The
success
of
American
human
rightspolicy
abroad
ismeasured
in
terms
of
progress
toward
political
freedoms,
Abrams
said.
He
was
en-
couraged
bythe
latest
legislative
elections
in
the
Philippines,
which
he
termed
"the
freest
there
in
ten
years."
"We
are
neither
for
Marcos
nor
the
NewPeople's
Army.
But
we
do
make
it
clear
we
want
a
transition
to
democracy,"
Abrams
said,
referr-
ing
to
the
nation's
president
Ferdi-
nand
Marcos
and
theindigenous
rebel
movement.
Abrams,
who
was
challenged
by
critical
questions
after
his
talk,
had
one
parting
shot
for
opponents
of
the
Reagan
policy.
"We
have
two
audiences
that
at
home
andthat
abroad.We
weren't
voted
out
of
office,
so
I
think
we
must
be
succeeding"
in
gathering
support.
Paula
Russo
Princetonian
TOEING
THE
REAGAN
LINE,
Assistant
Secretary
of
State
for
Human
Rights
Elliott
Abramssaid
yesterday
afternoon
at
theWilsonSchool
that
the
U.S.
has
a
"moral
imperative"
to
defend
democracy.
Course
ratings:
Art
and
acting
top,
sciences
flop
By
EDWARD
NIESTAT
Students
continued
to
back
a
few
old
favorites,
while
choosing
newlosers,
in
this
year'sspringcourse
rating
sweepstakes.
Most
courses
did
fairly
well,
with
nine
courses
receiving
a
rating
of
4.9
or
better,
while
only
seven
received
less
than
3.0.
The
figures,
based
on
a
scale
of
one
to
five,
represent
students'
opi-
nions
on"the
overall
quality
of
teaching"
in
the
courses,
according
to
evaluations
supplied
by
the
registrar's
office.
Winners
Art
324,
"The
Artof
Print,"
and
Theater
andDance
307,
"In-
termediate
Studies
in
Acting
I,"
were
the
big
winners
both
receiv-
ing
perfect
5.0s
among
courses
rated
by
more
than
20
students.
These
two
courses
also
topped
the
list
for
the
same
category
lastyear.Professor
Alan
Mokler,
who
teaches
the
theater
class
along
with
Carol
Elliott,
attributed
his
class's
ongoing
success
to
the
quality
of
students
taking
his
course.
"The
students
really
want
to
learn,"
he
said.
"You
don't
take
a
class
like
this
jusj
for
kicks."
"We
like
to
start
out
rather
easy
and
work
our
way
up
to
the
very
difficult,
so
that
most
students
feel
proud
of
themselves
after
com-
pleting
thecourse,"
he
said.
"In
this
respect
I
guess
it's
a
lot
like
a
science
course."Fortunately
for
Mockler
his
course
was
nottoo
much
like
a
science
course
becausesciences
once
again
filled
thelosing
ranks
in
the
springratings.
With
the
lone
exception
of
Art
315,
"TheArt
of
Spain,"
the
worst-course
list
was
made
up
en-
tirely
of
science,
math
and
engineer-
ing
courses.
Low
honorsthisyear
went
to
Chemistry
406,
"Advanced
Physical
Chemistry,"
taught
by
Professor
Donald
McClure,
which
claimedlast
place
with
its
2.3
rating.
McClureattributed
his
course's
low
satisfaction
rating
to
the
fact
that
last
year
was
his
first
teachingthe
course
and
to
the
advanced
nature
of
his
material.
"The
studentevaluations
are
taken
pretty
seriously.
I
hope
it
will
be
better
this
year,"
he
said.
McClure's
course,
like
all
but
Psychology201,
"Personality,"
was
a
newcomer
to
the
bottom-ten
listing.
The
top
of
the
scale
also
showed
a
remarkable
amount
of
change,
with
only
the
toptwo
courses
holding
on
to
their
old
positions
and
the
next
eight
slots
being
filled
by
newcomers.
Foreign
languages
postedthe
greatest
gains
for
the
year,
taking
three
of
the
top
ten
slots
with
Chinese102
and
Japanese
102,
both
the
secondhalves
of
introductory
courses,
andSpanish
207,
"Studies
in
Spanish
Language
and
Style."
Strawberries...
and
lemons
Highest-Rated
Courses
More
Than
20
Responses
Art
and
Archaeology
324:
5.0
The
Artof
the
Print
Robert
Koch
Theatre
and
Dance307:
5.0
Intermediate
Studies
in
Acting
I
A.
Mokler,
C.
Elliott,
B.
McEleny
Art
andArchaeology
210:
4.9
Italian
Renaissance
Paintingand
SculptureJohn
Shearman
Chinese102:
4.9
Elementary
ChineseTa-tuan
Ch'en
Chem.
Engineering442:
4.9
Economy
of
Chemical
Processes
Ernest
Johnson
History
386:
4.9
American
Economic
Development
Michael
Bernstein
Japanese
102:
4.9
Elementary
Japanese
N.
Ogawa,
H.
Ueda
Spanish
207:
4.9
Spanish
Language
andStyle
D.Compte,
L.
Fernandez-
Cifuentes,
M.
Sutherland
Women's
Studies302:
4.9GenderIdeaology
in
Western
Culture
in
the
Modern
Era
Lowest-Rated
Courses
More
than20
Responses
Chemistry
406:
2.3AdvancedPhysicalChemistry
DonaldMcClure
Psychology
201:
2.4
Personality
Physics
204:
2.5Electromagnetism
and
Vectors
William
Louis
Art
and
Archaeology
315:
2.7
The
Artof
Spain
Thomas
Kaufmann
(Continued
on
page
two)
(Continued
on
page
three)
 
are
being
considered
include
restric-
ting
the
number
of
transfer
students,
more
strictly
enforcing
theprerequisiterequirements
to
enter
the'
department,
having
concen-
trators
who
are
also
enrolled
in
pro-
grams
do
one
junior
paperoutsidethe
Department
of
Politics
and
in-
creasing
thenumber
of
cognates
which
concentrators
may
take
to
fulfill
the
major.
Committee
members
say
they
wouldlike
to
inform
potential
con-
centrators
aboutthe
possibility
of
majoring
in
otherdepartments,
hopefully
-to
ease
the
strain.
But
if
all
else
fails,
restricting
thenumber
of
concentrators
may
become
an
option.
"There
are
three
basic
options,"
said
Murphy.
"We
can
restrict
thenumber
of,
majors,
increase
thenumber
of
faculty,
or
let
the
depart-
ment
disintegrate."
Restrictingthe
major
is
one
alter-
native
which
most
committee
membersoppose.
"The
last
thing
we
need
on
this
campusis
another
Woodrow
Wilson
School,"
said
Manuel
Gonzalez
'85,
who
is
on
thecommittee.
He
added
that
even
if
restriction
is
implemented,
it
would
not
be
a
permanent
solution.
Thecommittee
hopes
to
finalize
itsproposalswellbefore
this
year's
sophomores
choose
their
majors.
World
News
Ruckelshaus
to
step
down
as
head
of
EPA
in
January
WASHINGTON
William
Ruckelshaus
'55,
administrator
of
the
EnvironmentalProtection
Agency,
submitted
his
resignation
yesterday
to
President
Reagan,
who
accepted
it.
The
resignation
will
take
effect
Jan.5,
1985.
Ruckelshauswas
the
first
chief
of
the
EPA,
serving
as
administrator
from
1970
to
1973.
He
moved
from
there
to
the
Justice
Department,
serving
as
deputy
attorneygeneral
beforeresigning
in
October
1973
rather
than
follow
President
Richard
Nixon's
order
to
fire
Watergate
specialprosecutor
Ar-
chibald
Cox.
He
was
a
seniorvice
president
of
Weyerhaueuser
Co.,
a
Seattle-based
forest
products
company,
in
May
1983
when
Reagan
tapped
him
to
succeed
Anne
Burford
as
chief
of
theembattled
EPA.
Even
the
administration's
sharpest
environmental
critics
have
had
praise
for
the
job
done
by
Ruckelshausin
restoring
morale
at
the
agency.
But
manyhave
been
upset
at
the
administration's
failure
to
take
action
to
control
acid
rain.
Ruckelshaushas
defended
the
ad-
ministration's
decision
to
seek
more
funding
for
acid
rain
research
rather
than
embark
on
a
strict
pro-
gram
of
controls.
Schroeder
recuperates
from
heart
implant
LOUISVILLE,
Ky.
An
"alert
and
cooperative"
William
Schroeder
sat
up
in
bed
yesterday,
joked
with
his
nurses
and
ate
his
first
solid
food
since
receiving
a
mechanical
heart
warm
porridge
fed
to
himby
his
wife.
Doctors
saidthe
52-year-old
retired
quality
assurance
specialist
continued
making
anexcellentrecovery.
At
midafternoon,
they
said,
Schroeder
sat
up
in
bed
with
help
from
his
doctorsand
briefly
dangled
hisfeet
over
the
side
of
his
hospital
bed.
Dr.
Robert
R.
Goodin,a
car-
diologist
who
cared
for
Schroeder
before
his
operation,
said
he
was
"amazed
that
hehas
this
kind
of
From
the
Associated
Press
strength
and
progress"
so
soon
after
surgery.
Goodin
said
Schroeder's
wife
told
him
she
felt
her
husband
"was
more
comfortabletoday
and
in
the
past
24
hoursthan
he
had
been
for
months
priorto
the
surgery."
New
tax
proposals
would
squeeze
evaders
WASHINGTON
The
TreasuryDepartment
claimsits
plan
for
revamping
thefederal
tax
system
will
do
much
to
close
the
$90.5
billion
a
yearlost
to
cheaters,
but
the
agency
flatly
rejects
tem-
porary
amnesty
as
an
incentive
for
delinquent
taxpayers
to
settle
their
accounts.
"Amnesties
can
only
reinforce
the
growingimpression
that
the
tax
system
is
unfair
and
encourages
tax-
payer
noncompliance,"
the
Treasury
saidthis
week
in
a
voluminous
report
to
President
Reagan
onideas
for
overhauling
theincome
tax.
Several
states'
recentsuccess
with
amnesty
has
prompted
members
of
Congress
to
suggest
a
similar
pro-
gram
at
thefederallevel.The
Treasury
report
concluded
that
amnestyis
not
worth
the
risk.
Today's
weather
Today,
mostly
cloudy
until
late
morning,
then
mostly
sunny.
High
in
the
mid
50s.
Northwesterly
winds
at
10
to
15
mph.
Tonight,
mostly
clear.
Low
in
the
lower
30s.
Tomorrow,
mostly
sunny.
Highin
theupper
50s.
Published
five
times
per
week,
Monday
thru
Friday
during
the
college
year,
except
during
ex-
amination
andreading
periods
threetimes
per
week,
Monday,
Wednesday
and
Fridayand
one
issue
in
July
by
The
Daily
PrincetonianPublishing
Company,
Inc.,
48
University
Place,
Princeton,
New
Jersey
08540.
Subscription
rates:
Undergraduates
andgraduatestudent
on
campus,University
Offices,
and
Faculty
apartments
$27.50
a
year,
$15.00
a
term.
Mailed
in
the
United
States,
$33.00
a
year
$18.00
a
term.
Foreign
and
Quantity
Rates
available
upon
request.
Officehours:
Monday
thru
Friday,
1:30
to
5:30p.m.
Telephones:
Area
Code
(609),
Business
924-7570;
Newsand
Editoral:
921-9200.
If
no
answer
call
452-3633.
Reproduction
of
any
material
in
this
newspaper
without
express
permission
of
The
Daily
Princetonian
Publishing
Company,
Inc.,
is
strictlyprohibited.Copyright
1984,
The
Daily
Princetonian
Publishing
Company,
Inc.
The'
DailyPrincetonian,
Thursday,November'29,
1984
(Continued
from
page
one)
Committee
seeks
restrictions
2
a^.»^
M
.»ittfca»^a»»»»aa»»aaa»»a»»a»»»
M
a.»»»a-.
-ft
**.
tyzeat
TtfatCChinese
HZettauzant
LUNCHEONSPECIAL
-
$3.25
includingsoup,
entrae.
rice
&
tea
10%
discount
w/student
ID
for
dinner.
11:30-9:30.
M-Th
HARRISONSTREET
Fri.
&
Sat.
til
10:30
Princeton
Shopping
Center
Sun.,
4:00-9:30
Princeton,
N.J.
(
1
j
E.C.S./His.
406
|
1
The
History
of
Mentalities
j
Prof.
R.
Darnton
&
C.
Geertz
*
|
Interestedstudents
submit
statement
to
European
f
k
Cultural
Studies
Program,240
EastPyne,explaining
|
reasons,
major
field
of
study,
general
interests.
f
Statements
deadline
Mon.,
Dec.
3,4
p.m.
15
students
I
|
will
beselected
and
informed
before
cards
are
due.
{
L
I
Peace
and
Justice
jff\
A
series
designed
to
help
students
reflect
on
their
vocations
H
Wr
and
ways
in
which
they
can
serve
life's
greater
purposes
IS
THE
LAW
JUST?
DISCUSSION
WITH
PROF.
CHARLES
FRIED
'56
Harvard
Law
School
PROF.
JOEL
HANDLER'S
4
niversity
of
Wisconsin
Law
School
,
.
.
.....
.
.
~
.
Tonight,
November
29,
1984
7:30
pm,
WWS
Bowl
1
Sponsoredby
StudentVolunteers
Council,
Interfaith
Council,
United
Campus
Ministries
(Jewish
and
Christian
chaplaincies)
and
Princeton
University
Chapel
Student
Friends
l^^^XV
of
the
J
Art
Museum
presents
A
Trip
to
the
Japan
House
—11
centuries
of
Japanese
caligraphy
Friday,
November
30,
3:00
p.m.
Notickets
necessary
(No
transportation
provided)
ALL
WELCOME
Meet
at
333
East
47th
St.
(between
Ist
and2nd
Avenues)
at
3:00
p.m.
Sign-up
(optional)
on
McCormick
Hall
Bulletin
Board
PLAIN
BURGER
CHEESEBURGER
CALIFORNIA.
g
BURGERS
ARE
BEST
|
|
ATPFsI
|
...
Plain
Burger
£
I
...
California
Burger
|
S
...Cheeseburger-American,
3
S
Swiss,
White,
Cheddar
|
«
...
Bacon
&
Cheeseburger
8
|
...
Chili
Burger
A
m
...
Smother
Burger
§
3
always
made
from
(*»
fresh
ground
beef
5
TheFamil
y
pleaser
t
8
a^V
°
lP
iRKfiPIr
154Nassau
Street
H
|luKifP|
Princeton
§
|
924-1353
g
ON
A
KAISERROLL
WITH
FRENCH
FRIES
J
 
However,
they
disagreeover
the
right
of
the
students
to
use
residen-
tial
college
resources,
like
notice
boards
and
newsletters,
to
advertise
the
closed
meetings.
"It
seems
to
me
that
there
are
two
thingsgoing
on,
substance
and
symbol,"
Weiss
said
last
night.
"Dean
Lowe
and
I
both
feel
that
the
substance
of
minority
students
gettingtogether
only
with
other
minority
students
can
be
a
construc-
tive
thing
to
do."
"The
difficulty
is
at
the
level
of
symbol,"
she
said.
"Once
you
makean
exception
on
the
principle
of
openness,
it
seems
impossible
to
deny
exceptions
to
other
groups
with
exclusionary
purposes
that
I
might
find,that
black
students
might
find,
less
attractive."
Members
of
the
Black
Students
Table
argue
in
an
official
letter
presented
to
the
Race
Relationscommittee
that
"the
black
ex-
perience
is
a
unique
one,
and
as
such
requires
unique
andsensitive
attention
by
the
university."
The
letter
goes
on
to
say
that
all
but
one
of
their
meetings
each
semester
will
be
open
to
the
entire
university
community.
The
decision
by
administrators
to
make
advertising
resources
off-
limits
to
the
group
indicates
"that
the
universityis
unwilling
to
take
a
roleinhelping
black
students
deal
with
their
unique
problems,
pro-
blems
which
come
on
top
of
the
already
difficult
Princeton
workload,"
the
letter
says.
"There's
no
way
that
someone
can
understand
what
pain
some
of
the
situations
and
statements
that
minority
students
are
faced
with
on
a
daily
basis
can
cause
unless
theyexperience
them
themselves,"
said
David
Jackson
'87,
a
member
of
the
organization
yesterday.
Members
of
the
group
say
that
the
need
for
a
support
group
like
theBlack
Students
Table
has
in
re-
cent
years
becomemore
essential
because
of
CURL,
which
they
say
has
broken
upgroups
that
in
the
The
studentscontend
that
their
situation
is
similar
to
the
Women's
Center,
which
already
ispermitted
to
hold
closed
meetings.
Ad-
ministrators
maintain,
however,
that
there
are
significant
differences
between
the
Women's
Center,
which
is
a
voluntary
organization,and
the
residential
colleges.
OFFICIAL
NOTICES
The
Daily
Princetonian
publishes
notices
as
a
service
to
the
universitycommunity.
Notices
will
NOT
be
printed
unless
they
are
typed
ona
40-spacc
line
and
submitted
by
1
p.m.
the
daybefore
they
are
to
appear.Eachsubmission
will
run
for
a
maximum
of
three
days.
CAREERSERVICES/JOBSEARCHSUMMERINTERNSHIP
Reminder:
Applications
for
American
Society
of
Magazine
Editors
summer
internship
are
due
at
Career
Svcs
Dec.
3.
For
info,
check
NY-
Mediabinder
shelf
12.
(30)
CAREER
SVCS
The
Carnegie
Endow-
ment
for
Intematl.
Peace
is
offering
a
six-
monthwork
experience
in
Wash.,
D.C.
for
studentsintending
careers
in
Internatl.
Af-
fairs.
Contact
Bill
Corwin
in
Career
Svcs.
for
info
andapplic.
Deadline:Jan.31.
(30)
CAREER
SVCS
Inf
mtg.
scheduled
for
tonight:
Goldman
Sachs,
Investment
Banking
Div.,
at
WWS
Bowl
2,
7:30p.m.
Nor-
thwestern
Mutual
Life
Ins.
hadadded
a
se-
cond
schedule
for
Dec.
7,
intvws.
avail,
for
wtg.
list
and
others.
(29)
CAREER
SVCS
Career
Roundtable:
"Careers
in
thePetroleum
andChemical
In-
dustry,"
with
Dr.
RichardGolden
'54,
VicePres.
for
Devel.,Arco
ChemicalComp.,
Fril,
Nov.
30,
1984
from
4-5p.m.
in
the
thirdfloor
Conference
Room
of
W.
College.
Attendance
limited,
sign
up
at
Career
Svcs.(30)
COURSE
INFORMATION
POLITICS
Juniors:
sign
up
sheet
for
springterm
courses
in
400
Corwin.
(29)
REGISTRAR
Spring
term
course
cards
and
course
offerings
avail.
Filingdates:
Jun.,
Dec.
5;
Sophs,
Dec.
7;
Srs.,
Dec.
10;
Frosh,
Dec.
1?.
$5/day
late
filing
fee.(30)
REGISTRAR
Final
exam
schedules
avail.
(30)
DEPARTMENTAL
LECTURESEAS
Seminar
Fri.,
Nov.
30
at
2
p.m.
in
202
Jones
Hall
Lounge.
Prof.
PatEbrey
U.
of
Illinois,
will
speak
on:
"Relationship
between
ritual
and
education
in
pre-modern
China."
(30)
FELLOWSHIPS/FOREIGNSTUDYHONGKONG,
TAIWAN,
SINGAPORE
Princeton-in-Asia,
224
Palmer
Hall,
seeks
candidates
for
jobs
for
one
and
two
years.
In
Macao
too.
(29)
STUDY
ABROAD
Application
deadline
is
Friday,
Nov.
30
for
spring
semester
study
abroad.Call
121-5524
for
further
informa-
tion.
(30)
SCHOLARSHIP
St.
Andrews
SocietyScholarship
for
one
year
of
study
in
Scotland.
Eligibility:
seniors
of
Scottish
descent.
Ap-
plication
materials:
Judith
Tilton,
21
Prospect
rm.
108,
2-5510.
(30)
LABOUISSE
FELLOWSHIP
Oneyear
foreign
research/study
grant
for
graduatingseniorinterested
in
questionsrelating
to
im-
provement
of
conditions
in
the
less-developed
world.
Applications/information
in
308
WestCollege,
x-3055.
(30)
MISCELLANEOUS
PROSPECT
FOUNDATION
Germantable
tonight,
6:00p.m.
at
Campus
Club.
(28)
PEACE
&
JUSTICE
How
can
weserve:
Is
the
law
just?
Discussion
with
Charles
Fried
'56
(Harvard)
andJoel
Handler'54(U.
of
Wise.)
on
Thurs.,
Nov.
29
at
7:30p.m.
in
WWS
Bowl
1.
Sponsoredby
SVC,
InterfaithCouncil,United
Campus
Ministries
and
Univ.
Chapel.(29)
STUDENTORGANIZATIONS
TWC
PROGRAMMING
COMMITTEE
Mtng.
tomorrow
at
9
p.m.
at
TWC.
All
members
please
attend.
(29)
GAP
Mtng.at
8
p.m.
tomorrow.
Abby
Rubenfeld
'75
from
Lamba
LegalDefense
Fund
will
speak
on
legal
aspects
of
equal
rights
for
gays.
(29)
COLLEGEBOWL
Mtg.
7:30p.m.
in
WWSRoom
3.
Last
practicebefore
In-
tramural
Tournament.
(29)
RELIGIOUSNOTICES
PEF
Fellowship
mtg.
and
Bible
study,
"The
Day
Christ
Died."
Fri.,
7:30,
W.
Room
Murray-Dodge.
All
welcome.(30)
DEAN'SLUNCHEON
DISCUSSION
Transformation,"
Sojourner
Truth.
Today,
Nov.
29,Room24,
Murray-Dodge
Hall.
Sponsored
by
the
Univ.
Chapel.
Lunch
is
pro-
vided
and
all
students
are
welcome.(29)
Doonesbury
BY
GARRY
TRUDEAU
The
Daily
Princetonian,
Thursday,
November.29,,
1984
Minorities
request
closed
meetings
(Continued
from
page
one)
3
j
Woodrow
Wilson
School
Lecture
j
WALTER
SLOCOMBE
'63
j
Former
Deputy
Under
Secretary
of
Defense
for
PolicyPlanning
and
Director
of
the
Department
of
Defense
SALT
Task
Force
during
theCarter
Administration
"Arms
Control
After
the
Election"
Today,
November29,
1984
4:30
p.m.
WWS
Bowl
1
PERSON
TO
PERSON
PEER
COUNSELING
|
Announces
Its
<
ANNUAL
TRAINING
PROGRAM
j
I
December
15-16
and
February
2-3
j
Registration:
December
5-12
by
calling
452-3644
<
The
Person
to
Person
Peer
Counseling
The
training
isdivided
into
two
,
Program
trainsstudents
to
help
other
weekends.
The
first
session,
Satur-
<
,
students.
Peer
Counselors
provide
day,
December
15
and
Sunday,
<>
support
and
informal
counseling
to
December
16,
from
9-5
will
focus
on
<
>
other
students,
primarily
those
whom
awareness
and
practice
in
basic
listen-
>
they
already
know.
Areascoveredin
ing
skills.The
second
session,
to
be
<
(
the
training
include
helping
others
dealheld
on
Saturday,
February
2
and
Sun-
(
with
depression,
loneliness,
anxiety,
day,
February
3,
9-5,
will
involve
relationships,
family
problems,
training
incrisis
intervention
in
the
academicpressure,
low
self-esteem,
areas
listed
above.
Both
sessions
will
alcohol
and
drug
abuse,anorexia,
be
held
in
Whig
Hall.
t
suicide
and
howto
refer
peers
to
pro-
The
December
weekend
is
open
to
>
fessional
counselors.
the
first
150
students
who
register.
'
he
February
training
is
limited
to
'
those
studentswho
go
through
the
'
irst
weekend
and
an
application
and
*
*
interview
process.
<
>
*
Trainers:Dr.
William
K.
Kirby,
Laurie
Posner-Forrest
*
andPresentPeer-to-Peer
Counselors
>
For
information,
call
Williamat
4-7903
or
Ramona
at
4-7566
<
USGProjects
Board
I
Meeting
I
j
Thursday,
December
6
j
8:00
p.m.
WWS
Room
3
Applications
are
due
on
j
j
Monday,
December
3
j
J
at
4:30
p.m.
|
j
(Use
YELLOW
applicationform.)
j
i
Maayax
>-flalaX
*)
)
KaaMaMymWtmX
y*mmmx
>
-aaVJaYX
>-OaYflaV4
1
THEATRE
INTIME
SEASON
SUBSCRIPTIONS
NOWON
SALE!
STUDENTS:
5
shows
$14
(a
30%
savings)
Box
Office:
Tues.
-
Fri.1:30
-
5:30
452-4950