Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
SEEKING ONE THING.pdf

SEEKING ONE THING.pdf

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY J. R. MILLER




THERE is a great deal of
waste in all lines of life,
because men scatter their
energies over too wide a
field. Instead of doing
one thing well, they do a
dozen things indifferently. No one is great
enough to do everything. In the arts and
professions men are more and more becom-
ing specialists. Even ordinary ability would
be sure of success if it found its true place
and then devoted itself wholly to its work.
Though a man may fail again and again, if
he persists and never becomes discouraged, he
will at last succeed.
BY J. R. MILLER




THERE is a great deal of
waste in all lines of life,
because men scatter their
energies over too wide a
field. Instead of doing
one thing well, they do a
dozen things indifferently. No one is great
enough to do everything. In the arts and
professions men are more and more becom-
ing specialists. Even ordinary ability would
be sure of success if it found its true place
and then devoted itself wholly to its work.
Though a man may fail again and again, if
he persists and never becomes discouraged, he
will at last succeed.

More info:

Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Oct 29, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/29/2013

pdf

text

original

 
SEEKING ONE THINGBY J. R. MILLER THERE is a great deal of waste in all lines of life,because men scatter theirenergies over too wide afield. Instead of doingone thing well, they do adozen things indifferently. No one is greatenough to do everything. In the arts andprofessions men are more and more becom-ing specialists. Even ordinary ability wouldbe sure of success if it found its true placeand then devoted itself wholly to its work.Though a man may fail again and again, if he persists and never becomes discouraged, hewill at last succeed.Blest is the man of high ideals,Who fails to-day, to-morrow, and for days to come,But never lowers his standards, nor surrenders todefeat,[147]ifinDtng tl)c WavTill hand and foot, till eye and ear,
 
Till vocal cord and tongue.Till mind and heart are disciplined,And all abilities of body and of soulAre marshalled by the WillAnd move onward to the drumbeat of perfection."There is a remarkable direction in our Lord'sinstruction to the Seventy. Among otherthings, he bade them salute no man by theway. The salutations of those days weretedious and required much time, and theerrands on which his messengers were sentwere urgent and required haste. Not a mo-ment must be lost on the way. When a dis-ciple begged to be allowed to bury his fatherbefore going on his errand, the Master re-fused the request. The dead could burytheir own dead, and he must hasten to carrythe gospel message.If we would concentrate all our energies inone purpose, we should do all our work bet-ter. We would then always do our best,even in the commonest things of our dailytaskwork. If we are writing only a postal-[148]flDne Cl^fng 91 ?©ocard to a friend, we will do it as carefullyas if we were writing a letter of greatestimportance. We would gather all the forces
 
of our heart into the simplest kindness weshow to anyone. There are authors who havewritten one or two books of great interestand value and then have grown indifferent,doing nothing more worth while. They weretoo well satisfied with their early success ora little praise turned their heads, and theynever did their best again." // at first you do succeed,Try again !Life is more than just one deed ;Try again.Never stop with what you've done.More remains than you have won,Full content's vouchsafed to none ;Try again !An old painter, after standing long in silentmeditation before his canvas, w^ith handscrossed meekly on his breast and his headbent reverently, said, "May God forgive me[149]fjfinDing tl^e Wa^that I did not do it better." There are manyof us who ought to have the same experienceof penitence as we contemplate the thingswe have done. We should continually im-plore forgiveness for doing our work sopoorly, for we are not doing our best. If only we would learn to put all the energy

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->