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TAKING UP THE CROSS DAILY.pdf

TAKING UP THE CROSS DAILY.pdf

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY J. R. MILLER



JESUS said, "If any man
would come after me, let
him • • • take up his cross
daily and follow me.'*
Many people misread these
words. They suppose Je-
sus refers to his own cross, telling us that if
we would be his followers we must bear his
cross. That is true in a sense. The Christian
Church is an army of cross-bearers. But the
meaning here is, that every Christian has a
cross of his own which he must take up and
carry loyally after his Master.
BY J. R. MILLER



JESUS said, "If any man
would come after me, let
him • • • take up his cross
daily and follow me.'*
Many people misread these
words. They suppose Je-
sus refers to his own cross, telling us that if
we would be his followers we must bear his
cross. That is true in a sense. The Christian
Church is an army of cross-bearers. But the
meaning here is, that every Christian has a
cross of his own which he must take up and
carry loyally after his Master.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Oct 29, 2013
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TAKING UP THE CROSS DAILYBY J. R. MILLER JESUS said, "If any manwould come after me, lethim • • • take up his crossdaily and follow me.'*Many people misread thesewords. They suppose Je-sus refers to his own cross, telling us that if we would be his followers we must bear hiscross. That is true in a sense. The ChristianChurch is an army of cross-bearers. But themeaning here is, that every Christian has across of his own which he must take up andcarry loyally after his Master.There are crosses which we make for our-selves. A child could not understand what across in life is, and the father explained it inthis way. A cross is composed of two piecesof wood, one longer, one shorter. The short-er piece represents our will, and the longerGod's will. Lay the pieces side by side and no1183]cross is formed. But lay the shorter acrossthe longer, and there is a cross. Wheneverour will falls athwart God's will, we have across. We make a cross for ourselves when werefuse to take Grod's way, to accept his will,or when we chafe or fret at anything Godsends us. When, however, we quickly acceptwhat God gives, and yield in sweet acquies-cence to the divine will, we have no crosses tocarry.
 
Yet there are many people who fill theirlives with crosses by refusing to let God havehis way with them. Much physical illness andpain are produced by violation of law, andthe suffering endured in consequence is self-inflicted. Much of the trouble in people'slives they bring upon themselves by theirindiscretions, follies and evil habits. Thenthere are those who make crosses for them-selves by magnifying their common ills, bydwelling on their troubles, by brooding overimaginary evils until their moderate shareof mortal infehcities grows into a seemingmountain of calamities. If all the crosses we[184]Croisiseismake for ourselves were taken out of ourlives, we should not have many left. Far morethan we realize or could be made to believe,are we the authors of our own troubles.We make many crosses for each other. Wedo not know what it costs other people tolive with us. There is a great deal of selfish-ness in the world, even in the best Christians,and selfishness makes life hard for others.There is much thoughtlessness in even thebest human love, and thoughtlessness con-tinually makes suffering in gentle hearts.Marriage is the most sacred and holy of allhuman relationships, but there are few evenamong those most congenially and most hap-pily wedded, who do not make many crossesfor each other. They do not mean to do it — 
 
they love each other and it is in their heartsalways to give cheer, happiness and comfort.But unconsciously they say and do thingscontinually which give pain and makecrosses.Or it may be in what they do not do, in neg-lect of love's duties. With most good people[186]it is in the lack of kindnesses rather than inwords or deeds of unkindness that unloving-ness is chiefly wrought."So many tender words and trueI meant to say, dear love, to you:So many things I meant to do — BiU I forgot.''There are parents who lay crosses on theirchildren. There is no love more unselfish thana father's and a mother's, yet there are chil-dren in some homes that starve for love'sdaily bread. Some one says that children donot dream of the fire under the snow in thereticent nature of their parents. Yes, but thefire of parental love never should be buriedunder any snow of conventionality, of pride,of coldness, of reserve. The parent lays aheavy cross on the life of a child when hewithholds love's warmth and affectionate-ness.In all life's relations there is a great deal of cross-making for others. A man who pledgeshis troth to a woman at the marriage altar

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