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10-22-13

10-22-13

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Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Oct 29, 2013
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Diversity comes in all colors,shapes, genders and creeds; it ispresent in universities across theUnited States. Armative action,which was enacted in the ‘60s, hasbeen used as a deterrento discrimination in workplacehiring and college admissions. Butthe Supreme Court will soon weighin on a case concerning the Univer-sity and colleges and universitiesnationwide, whichmay cause them to change admis-sion policies concerning armativeaction.“What I tell my students is that it’sa guide, an advantage to minoritiesto compensate or past grievances,”said Cristina Bejarano, proessoro political science. “It’s a way orthe government to step in and helpgroups that have had the sameadvantages as other people have.”In 2006, voters in Michiganbanned armative action withinthe state through a reerendumaer the Supreme Court ruled andupheld the University o Michiganarmative action policy. Sincearmative action inuences bothacceptance rates and job opportu-nities, voters in Michigan soughtto change the state’s policy by wo University o Kansasproessors will soon have a new article published in PhilosophicalPerspectives, an academic journalwhich will appear eature theirnew article, Egalitarianism andPerceptions o Inequality, whichdetails the proessors’ research inthe causes, eects and perceptionso modern economic inequality.Te proessors, Derrick Darby o the law and philosophy depart-ments and Nyla Branscombe o the psychology department, haveco-authored the new article in thehopes o oering some insightinto how to address the issue o inequality in the United States,Proessor Darby said.Te article, which exploresthe darker side o the modernAmerican economic system, raisesissues about the way Americans view and understand inequality.Not only does it detail the causes o inequality in a broad sense, it alsodetails the impact that social andeconomic inequality have on dis-advantaged groups and minorities.“Te topic o inequality has beena huge issue in recent years,” Darby At the start o a new internship,one eels a sense o pride, accom-plishment and hope that it willopen new doors. It’s the start o agrand new adventure that can leadto a successul career.But or some they turn intonightmares o supervisors andcoworkers taking advantage o their interns’ willingness to work and eagerness to do well.And or an unortunate ew,this exploitation becomes sexualharassment, rom which unpaidinterns are not protected.For decades, sexual harass-ment claims rom unpaid internsagainst the companies they work or have been thrown out becausethe interns don’t receive pay andare thereore not protected underemployment law.Earlier this month, a New York court ruled that New York’shuman rights laws did not protectLihuan Wang, an unpaid internor Phoenix Satellite elevisionU.S., because the company did notpay her. Te court dismissed hercase saying Wang could not fle asexual harassment claim againstthe company because she was notan employee.Tis hits close to home or somestudents at the University, as hal o all internships posted throughthe University Career Center areunpaid, said Erin Wolram, assis-tant director o the UCC.“It may not be an ideal situa-tion, but most students eel theseinternships are helpul to them insome way,” Wolram said.Te US Department o Labor de-fnes the parameters o an unpaidintern in a or-proft company us-ing six criteria the internship mustmeet. One o the criteria that mustbe met is that the intern does notdisplace regular employees, butworks under close supervision o existing sta. A second importantcriterion listed is that the employerthat provides the training derivesno immediate advantage rom theactivities o the intern.Tese two criteria protect theunpaid interns rom being giventhe same workload as a regularemployee without monetary com-pensation. However, the unpaidinterns are not protected romsexual harassment through theDepartment o Labor or throughstate law.In Kansas, the Act Against Dis-crimination covers all employees,but unpaid interns do not allunder that label and don’t get thesame protections. Tis gap inprotection has le unpaid interns vulnerable and oen exploited.Upon learning o the case inNew York, Megan Hazelwood, a junior rom Baldwin City whodid an unpaid internship orclass credit over the summer, wasshocked that she had been in aposition or several months whereshe was completely unprotected.“I wasn’t even aware that, i youare doing an unpaid internship,you wouldn’t be protected romsexual harassment,Hazelwoodsaid. “I don’t really understandwhy people who aren’t paid aren’tprotected.”o Hazelwood, because thework done by unpaid interns issometimes equivalent to that o aull-time employee, it seems unairthat they wouldn’t be protectedequally under law.“I think everyone should haveprotection rom that, paid orunpaid,” Hazelwood said.Tough no incidents have everbeen reported in relation to in-ternships posted by the University,it is important or students to beinormed o their rights, or lack thereo, when entering into anunpaid internship.Jane McQueeny, executive direc-tor o the Oce o InstitutionalOpportunity and Access, says thatstudents should be proactive inavoiding situations where sexualharassment can occur.“Students need to recognizethat the best thing they can door themselves is to speak up,”McQueeny said.McQueeny notes that thoughthere may not be legal action avail-able to students in this position, itis important or them to notiy theUniversity.“Tough there may be no legalrecourse, IOA would look at dis-associating the University with thecompany,” McQueeny said. “KUwould always want to do what ismorally right and not put our stu-dents in that kind o situation.”
—Edited by Sylas May 
 Volume 126 Issue 33
kansan.com
Tuesday, October 22, 2013
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 7CROSSWORD 5CRYPTOQUIPS 5OPINION 4SPORTS 8SUDOKU 5
Windy with a ew clouds.Northwest winds at 20 to30 mph
Register to vote on Wescoe Beach.
IndexDon’tforgetToday’s Weather
This is making me blue
HI: 62LO: 30
SAFETY
Supreme Court to hear afrmative action case 
JOSE MEDRANO
 jmedrano@kansan.com 
ROB PYATT
rpyatt@kansan.com 
NATIONRESEARCH
UNSALARIED AND UNCLEAR
State and national laws don’t protect unpaid interns rom sexual harassment in the workplace
ASHLEIGH TIDWELL
atidwell@kansan.com 
ILLUSTRATION BY TREY CONRAD
KU
enrollment by race 2012-2013 (total enrollment percentage27,135 total), Grad+UndergradAmerican Indian or Alaskan Native: 0.6%Asian: 3.8%Black or Arican American: 3.7%Hispanic/Latino: 5.9%Native Hawaiian or other Pacifc Islander: 0.1%White: 75.1%Two or more races: 3.8%Race/ethnicity unknown: 0.6%Non-resident alien: 6.4%
KSU
enrollment by race, total student 24,378 (2012-2013)American Indian or Alaskan Native: 0.4%Asian: 1.2%Black or Arican American: 4.3%Hispanic/Latino: 5.6%Native Hawaiian or other Pacifc Islander: 0.1%White: 77.3%Two or more races: 2.6%Race/ethnicity unknown: 1.9%Non-resident alien: 6.6%
WSU
enrollment by race, total students 14,716 (2012-2013)American Indian or Alaskan Native: 1.0%Asian: 6.6%Black or Arican American: 6.4%Hispanic/Latino: 8.2%Native Hawaiian or other Pacifc Islander: 0.1%White: 64.7%Two or more races: 2.1%Race/ethnicity unknown: 4.1%Non-resident alien: 6.9%
Data provided by National Center for Education Statistics 
SEE DIVERSITYPAGE 2SEE ECONOMICSPAGE 2
Professors to publish article
on economic inequalities
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Nyla Branscombe sits in her ofce. Branscombe has co-authored an article on economic inequality that will soon be pub-lished in the academic journal Philosophical Perspectives.
PAGE 5PAGE 8
FALL FUNBUD ADAMS DIES
Seasonal activitiesto add varietyTitans owner, KU alumnusleaves legacy
 
What do a Nobel-prize winningeconomist and a world-re-nowned opera singer have incommon? Both singer JoyceDiDonato and economist VernonSmith have been selected toreceive honorary degrees romthe University o Kansas.Although nominees do not haveto be KU alumni, Vernon Smithreceived aMaster’s De-gree in Eco-nomics romKU in 1954.His notablework includesdevelopingmethodsto study experimentaleconomics. According to KU’snominee webpage, Smith willreceive a Doctor o Science de-gree or notable contributions toexperimental economics.Joyce DiDonato is a worldamous mez-zo-sopranosinger whohas perormedaround theglobe on thebiggest operastages, romChicago to Mi-lan to okyo.She won a 2012Grammy or her album DivaDivo. DiDonato will receive aDoctor o Arts degree or notablecontributions to opera.Anyone rom the University o Kansas or the public can nom-inate someone or an honorary degree. Te nominee’s work mustbe relevant to KU's academic en-deavors. Nominees are not madeaware o their consideration orthe degrees unless they are ulti-mately selected. Te committeetasked with approving nomineesis composed o both KU sta andmembers o the public.Te process or selecting thenominees to receive honorary degrees is extensive. Accord-ing to theater proessor JohnGronbeck-edesco, the selectionprocess can take well over a year.Proessor Gronbeck-edesco isa member o the committee thatselected this year’s nominees.Although there are many toomany criteria or receiving anhonorary degree to list, any nom-inee’s work must be ar-reaching:“Te most undamental criteriais that the individual has had toprovide distinguished service onan international level,” Gron-beck-edesco said.Although both honorees havemade contributions that havechanged the world, both willreceive their recognition alongwith this year’s graduating Jay-hawks. DiDonato and Smith willbe presented with degrees at KU’sgraduation ceremony on May 18,2014 at Memorial Stadium.
—Edited by Sylas May 
What:
Bike KU
When:
7:30 to 8:30 a.m.
Where:
Wescoe Beach
About:
Breakast and inormation airor students, aculty and sta whoride their bikes to, rom or on campushosted by the Center or Sustainability
What:
“Inside the Park” Book Signing
When:
5:30 p.m.
Where:
Edwards Campus, JayhawkCentral, Bookstore
About:
Book signing with Willie Wilson,ormer Kansas City Royals player
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Trevor Gra
Managing editors
Allison KohnDylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren ArmendarizHayley JozwiakElise ReuterMadison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole AnnebergAllyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERSMedia director andcontent stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2013PAGE 2CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: KansanNewsFacebook: acebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the studentnewspaper o the University o Kansas.The frst copy is paid through the studentactivity ee. Additional copies o TheKansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can bepurchased at the Kansan business ofce,2051A Dole Human Development Center,1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS.,66045.The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the schoolyear except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, allbreak, spring break and exams and weeklyduring the summer session excludingholidays. Annual subscriptions by mailare $250 plus tax. Send address changesto The University Daily Kansan, 2051ADole Human Development Center, 1000Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check outKUJH-TVon Knologyo KansasChannel 31 in Lawrence or more on whatyou’ve read in today’s Kansan and othernews. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voicein radio. Whether it’s rock‘n’ roll or reggae, sports orspecial events, KJHK 90.7is or you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center1000 Sunnyside AvenueLawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
 Jay?
 What’s the
WednesdayThursdayFridayHI: 64HI: 54HI: 58LO: 32LO: 26LO: 38
— weather.com 
Mostly sunnyskies. Southwestwinds at 15 to 25mphSunshine. Northnorthwest windsat 4 to 10 mphMix o sun andclouds. Eastsoutheast windsat 5 to 6 mph
It’s Windbreaker Wednesday.Winter is coming.The anticipation is real.
Calendar
Tuesday, Oct. 22Wednesday, Oct. 23Thursday, Oct. 24Friday, Oct. 25
1814 W. 23rdLawrence, KS 843–6000
Any Sub
Tuesday is
 
DOUBLE
 
Stamp Day
Not Valid with any other offers
75¢ Off
 
25% OFF
25% OFF
KU MERCHANDISE
KU MERCHANDISE
TODAY’S DISCOUNT
TODAY’S DISCOUNT
Official local campus store since 1946
AVAILABLE IN STORE & ONLINE
/KUBookstore
What:
Ask-an-Advisor
When
: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where
: Stauer-Flint Lawn
About
: Tabling and inormation romadvisors rom dierent departmentsand academic units to answer stu-dents’ questions about enrollment
What
: Faculty Food or Thought
When
: 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Where
: Mrs. Ekdahl’s Dining CommonsAbout: Dinner with aculty in residencehalls dining commons
What:
Dealing with Stress
When:
9 to 11a.m.
Where:
Joseph R. Pearson Hall, Room204
About:
Workshop and seminar tounderstand and avoid stress
What:
Faculty Food or Thought
When:
5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Where:
Gertrude Sellards Pearson andOliver Halls
About
: Dinner with aculty in residencehalls dining commons
What:
Meet a Researcher
When:
3:30 to 5 p.m.
Where:
Anschutz Library, AnschutzLearning Studio
About:
Ice cream social to meet aculty,postdoctoral, graduate and undergrad-uate researchers
What:
Practicing Scales
When:
4 p.m.
Where:
Malott Hall
About:
Lecture and reception withSusan Gal on the ideologies o commu-nication
Economist, singer receive 
honorary doctorates 
ACADEMIA
TOM QUINLAN
tquinlan@kansan.com 
instating a constitutional banon armative action within thestate. Tat is what the SupremeCourt will be ruling on withinthe next several weeks.Armative action was intro-duced in the middle o the 1960sduring the civil rights era. Itsproponents say it is necessary topromote intellectual and culturaldiversity in society.“Armative action is needed topromote the diversity o thought.I everybody thinks the sameway, looks the same way anddoes the same things you don’tget that cultural blend that allowsnew ideas to emerge,” said JaneMcQueeny, executive director o the oce o Institutional Oppor-tunity and Access.Te University had a totalenrollment o 27,135 students— both undergraduate and grad-uate — during the 2012-2013academic year. Tere were 19,169undergraduate students enrolledin all 2012. O those students,75.1 percent were white, 5.9 per-cent were Hispanic, 3.8 percentwere Asian and 3.7 percent wereBlack, according to enrollmentdata by the Kansas Board o Regents and the National Centeror Education Statistics. Othergroups that were included in thedata were American Indians,Pacic Islanders, mixed racesand nonresidents.Other regional colleges, such asWichita State, had student popu-lations o 8.2 percent Latino and6.4 percent Arican-American.while Kansas State University had 5.6 percent Latino and 4.3percent Arican-American.“People orget that not everyonehas the same opportunitiesavailable to them, and ofen it’sminorities who don’t have thoseopportunities,” said McQueeny.Not everyone agrees that ar-mative action is the best way toensure the most people access tothose opportunities, though. Ina Gallup poll released in July, 67percent o respondents said meritshould be the sole considerationin college admissions, and only 28 percent said that race shouldbe a actor.Te court will be hearing thecase in the upcoming weeks, andi it upholds the reerendum andconstitutional ban in Michigan,other states may pass similar pol-icies banning armative action.Supporters o armative action,such as Bejarano, have said suchpolicies still pose a threat todisadvantaged students.“Tis is a civil rights issue, andit’s not primarily a state-by-stateissue,” Bejarano said. “Whenlooking back at segregation,some states decided not desegre-gate their students and the ed-eral government had to step andsay ‘no, the whole country hasto desegregate.’ Tis is an issuewhere the ederal governmenthas to step in and help disadvan-taged groups.”
—Edited by Hannah Barling 
said. “With movements like theOccupy Wall Street Movementand others like it, the issue o inequality and the denition o inequality remains a major debatein America.”Te article also addresses theethical issues that arise rom sucheconomic inequality seen in theUnited States. In their article, theproessors explore the disagree-ment that many people haveon whether society is obligatedto respond, and exactly how torespond, to such inequality.When asked about the topic o inequality with regards to race,ethnicity and gender, students voiced their opinions, but wereopen in admitting it was not therst thing on their minds.“I think their is some structuralinequality still present in theUnited States, along the lineso race or gender,” said RyanChilcoat, a reshman rom ulsa,Okla. “I wouldn’t say it’s necessar-ily blatant discrimination though.”Others were more critical o certain institutions and groups o people who might contribute toothers’ economic status.“I think there’s inequality incertain areas o the United Statesstill,” said Sabrina Allen, a juniorrom Centralia. “I think there’s alevel o inequality still, especially in Kansas, where there are ewerminorities that creates a kind o gap in equality.”As a part o their research, theProessors examined attitudesregarding wage gaps along raciallines, nding that among whiteinterviewees, 72 percent wereo the opinion that wage gapsbetween blacks and whites hadimproved over the last decade.Arican-American intervieweeswere not so optimistic, with only 38 percent o participants statingwage gaps had improved.“People who are better o andthose who are not so well o have very dierent denitions o inequality,” said Darby. “Philoso-phy ts into this debate becauseit helps us to understand whetherequality is or is not a problembased on varying understandingso equality.Whatever the eelings heldby students, the act remainsthat economic inequality is stilla pressing issue in the UnitedStates.“Inequality poses a seriousthreat,” said Darby. “Philosophy can help us to understand i andhow society should respond tosuch a problem.”Darby and Branscombe areplanning on a ollow-up articleocusing on society’s response toeconomic inequality and its per-ceptions in the academic journalMidwest Studies in Philosophy. 
—Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell 
Smith DiDonato 
ECONOMICS FROMPAGE 1DIVERSITY FROMPAGE 1
 
WANT NEWS UPDATES ALL DAY LONG?
 
Follow @KansanNews on Twitter 
 
Ambler Student Recre-ation Center is joiningthe smartphone worldwith the upcoming releaseo its mobile app, “KURecreation Services.” Tisree app is designed tomake it easier or studentsto access news and inor-mation regarding tnessclasses, intramural gameschedules, rec centerhours and more.In addition, Rebecca Go-ering, the Communica-tion Coordinator or KURecreation Services, saidthe app can help studentsstay on schedule.“It has the ability to sendpush notications,” Goer-ing said. “So, or example,i an intramural game iscancelled or some rea-son, a notication can besent directly to studentsphones.”Te app also eaturesdierent buttons thatprovide users with overallwellness inormation andinormation on tnessand tness classes, amongother subjects. “We are just trying to provide an-other orm or students tond inormation quickly,”said Goering.Te mobile app is linkedwith Ambler Student Rec-reation Center’s websiteand the announcementscreens inside the reccenter, so when inorma-tion is updated on one o them, it will automatically update on the others.Te app will be availableor both Android andiPhone and is expected tobe released soon. “We aregetting very, very close.We hope to have this appup and running withinthe next couple o weeks,”said Goering. Ambler Stu-dent Recreation Centerwill make an announce-ment on its website andsocial media accountswhen the app is availableor download. Te app isree or students.
—Edited by Sylas May 
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
An 18-year-old man wasarrested Sunday on the 1500block of Crestline Drive onsuspicion of rape by force. Nobond was posted.A 36-year-old woman wasarrested Sunday on the 2400block of Ousdahl Drive onsuspicion of domestic battery.No bond was posted. 
—Emily Donovan 
Inormation based on theDouglas County Sheri’sOfce booking recap.
New rec app helps students 
track ftness classes, hours 
TECHNOLOGYCRIME
PAIGE STINGELY
pstingely@kansan.com 
AMBLER STUDENT RECREATION CENTER
Truckers steal merchandise using new techniques
WICHIA, Kan. — o stealhuge shipments o valuable cargo,thieves are turning to a decep-tively simple tactic: Tey pose astruckers, load the reight ontotheir own tractor-trailers and driveaway with it.It's an increasingly commonorm o commercial identity thefthat has allowed con men to makeo each year with millions o dollars in merchandise, ofen oodand beverages. And experts say the practice is growing so rapidly that it will soon become the mostcommon way to steal reight.A generation ago, thieves simply stole loaded trucks out o parkinglots. But the industry's wideninguse o GPS devices, high-techlocks and other advanced security measures have pushed criminals toadopt new hoaxes.Helping to drive the scams,experts say, is the Internet, whichoers thieves easy access to vastamounts o inormation aboutthe trucking industry. Online da-tabases allow con men to assumethe identities o legitimate reighthaulers and to trawl or speciccommodities they want to steal.Besides hurting the nation'strucking industry — whichmoves more than 68 percent o alldomestic shipments — the thefshave real-world consequencesor consumers, including raisingprices and potentially allowingunsae ood and drugs to reachstore shelves.News reports rom across thecountry recount just a ew o thethefs: 80,000 pounds o walnutsworth $300,000 in Caliornia,$200,000 o Muenster cheese inWisconsin, rib-eye steaks valued at$82,000 in exas, $25,000 poundso king crab worth $400,000 inCaliornia.Te Hughson Nut Co. ell victimtwice last year, losing two loads valued at $189,000.Each time, the impostor truckersshowed up at the Livingston, Ca-li., nut processor on a Friday withall the proper paperwork to pick up a load o almonds.On the Monday ollowing thesecond thef, a customer called tocomplain that the almonds hadnever arrived in Arizona.Te company's quality assurancemanager, Raquel Andrade, recalledgetting a sinking eeling: "Uh-oh. Ithink it happened again."Te thefs are little-known andseldom discussed outside theworld o commercial trucking.Companies that have been vic-timized are ofen reluctant to talk about their losses.But crime reports and AssociatedPress interviews with law enorce-ment and industry leaders revealan alarming pattern that hurtscommerce, pushes up consumerprices and potentially puts Ameri-cans' health and saety at risk.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
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