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The A.O.C. Cookbook by Suzanne Goin

The A.O.C. Cookbook by Suzanne Goin

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Published by Alfred A. Knopf
Recipes featured: Grilled Hanger Steak with Sweet Peppers, Cherry Tomatoes, and Chimichurri; Fattoush Salad with Fried Pita, Cherry Tomatoes, Crumbled Feta, and Sumac; Grilled Fig Leaf Panna Cotta with Figs and Melon Sorbet.

Since her James Beard Award-winning first book, Sunday Suppers at Lucques, Suzanne Goin and her Los Angeles empire of restaurants have blossomed and she has been lauded as one of the best chefs in the country. Now, she is bringing us the recipes from her sophomore restaurant, A.O.C., turning the small-plate, shared-style dishes that she made so famous into main courses for the home chef. Among her many recipes, you can expect her addictive Bacon-Wrapped Dates with Parmesan; Duck Sausage with Candied Kumquats; Dandelion and Roasted Carrot Salad with Black Olives and Ricotta Salata; California Sea Bass with Tomato Rice, Fried Egg, and Sopressata; Lamb Meatballs with Spiced Tomato Sauce, Mint, and Feta; Crème Fraîche Cake with Santa Rosa Plums and Pistachios in Olive Oil; and S’Mores with Caramel Popcorn and Chocolate Sorbet.

But The A.O.C. Cookbook is much more than just a collection of recipes. Because Goin is a born teacher with a gift for pairing seasonal flavors, this book is full of wonderful, eye-opening information about the ingredients that she holds dear. She takes the time to talk you through each one of her culinary decisions, explaining her palate and how she gets the deeply developed flavor profiles, which make even the simplest dishes sing. More than anything, Goin wants you to understand her techniques so you enjoy yourself in the kitchen and have no problem achieving restaurant-quality results right at home.

And because wine and cheese are at the heart of A.O.C., there are two exciting additions. Caroline Styne, Goin’s business partner and the wine director for her restaurants, presents a specific wine pairing for each dish. Styne explains why each varietal works well with the ingredients and which flavors she’s trying to highlight, and she gives you room to experiment as well—showing how to shape the wine to your own palate. Whether you’re just grabbing a glass to go with dinner or planning an entire menu, her expert notes are a real education in wine. At the back of the book, you’ll find Goin’s amazing glossary of cheeses—all featured at A.O.C.—along with the notes that are given to the waitstaff, explaining the sources, flavor profiles, and pairings.

With more than 125 full-color photographs, The A.O.C. Cookbook brings Suzanne Goin’s dishes to life as she continues to invite us into her kitchen and divulge the secrets about what makes her food so irresistibly delicious.

Suzanne Goin was born and raised in southern California and graduated from Brown University. In 2006 she was the recipient of two awards from the James Beard Foundation (Best Chef California and Best Cookbook from a Professional Viewpoint for Sunday Suppers at Lucques), and she has received five concurrent nominations for Outstanding Chef of the Year. Goin is the chef and owner of Lucques, A.O.C., Tavern, and The Larder, all in Los Angeles, where she lives with her husband, David Lentz.
Recipes featured: Grilled Hanger Steak with Sweet Peppers, Cherry Tomatoes, and Chimichurri; Fattoush Salad with Fried Pita, Cherry Tomatoes, Crumbled Feta, and Sumac; Grilled Fig Leaf Panna Cotta with Figs and Melon Sorbet.

Since her James Beard Award-winning first book, Sunday Suppers at Lucques, Suzanne Goin and her Los Angeles empire of restaurants have blossomed and she has been lauded as one of the best chefs in the country. Now, she is bringing us the recipes from her sophomore restaurant, A.O.C., turning the small-plate, shared-style dishes that she made so famous into main courses for the home chef. Among her many recipes, you can expect her addictive Bacon-Wrapped Dates with Parmesan; Duck Sausage with Candied Kumquats; Dandelion and Roasted Carrot Salad with Black Olives and Ricotta Salata; California Sea Bass with Tomato Rice, Fried Egg, and Sopressata; Lamb Meatballs with Spiced Tomato Sauce, Mint, and Feta; Crème Fraîche Cake with Santa Rosa Plums and Pistachios in Olive Oil; and S’Mores with Caramel Popcorn and Chocolate Sorbet.

But The A.O.C. Cookbook is much more than just a collection of recipes. Because Goin is a born teacher with a gift for pairing seasonal flavors, this book is full of wonderful, eye-opening information about the ingredients that she holds dear. She takes the time to talk you through each one of her culinary decisions, explaining her palate and how she gets the deeply developed flavor profiles, which make even the simplest dishes sing. More than anything, Goin wants you to understand her techniques so you enjoy yourself in the kitchen and have no problem achieving restaurant-quality results right at home.

And because wine and cheese are at the heart of A.O.C., there are two exciting additions. Caroline Styne, Goin’s business partner and the wine director for her restaurants, presents a specific wine pairing for each dish. Styne explains why each varietal works well with the ingredients and which flavors she’s trying to highlight, and she gives you room to experiment as well—showing how to shape the wine to your own palate. Whether you’re just grabbing a glass to go with dinner or planning an entire menu, her expert notes are a real education in wine. At the back of the book, you’ll find Goin’s amazing glossary of cheeses—all featured at A.O.C.—along with the notes that are given to the waitstaff, explaining the sources, flavor profiles, and pairings.

With more than 125 full-color photographs, The A.O.C. Cookbook brings Suzanne Goin’s dishes to life as she continues to invite us into her kitchen and divulge the secrets about what makes her food so irresistibly delicious.

Suzanne Goin was born and raised in southern California and graduated from Brown University. In 2006 she was the recipient of two awards from the James Beard Foundation (Best Chef California and Best Cookbook from a Professional Viewpoint for Sunday Suppers at Lucques), and she has received five concurrent nominations for Outstanding Chef of the Year. Goin is the chef and owner of Lucques, A.O.C., Tavern, and The Larder, all in Los Angeles, where she lives with her husband, David Lentz.

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Categories:Topics, Food & Wine
Published by: Alfred A. Knopf on Oct 29, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/17/2013

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MEAT | SUMMER
176
SUMMER
grilled hanger steak with sweet peppers,cherry tomatoes, and chimichurri
Many years ago, right after my father passed away, my friend thepunk-rock chef guru Fred Eric invited me to assist him at a cooking festi-val in Rio de Janeiro. I have to say it was one of the wackiest of all my culi-nary adventures
ever.
It turns out that the man who arranged the wholeevent was a raging cocaine fiend and had not
 actually 
“arranged” any-thing at all! Well, that’s not completely true. We did have hotel rooms andwhat looked like an amazing itinerary. But, the first day, Fred and I stoodoutside our hotel for 4 hours waiting for a mysterious culinary expert whowas supposed to take us to the market and then on to our host restaurantto prep for the first event, which was, of course, that evening. Long storyshort, the host restaurant didn’t exist, and the crazy coked-up guy placedus at some friend’s restaurant, where they plied us with Caipirinhas madewith Bolivian coca-leaf liquor and tried to make us cook—let’s just saythings got
very 
ugly from there on out. As soon as I got over the once-horrifying, now hilarious moments, Iremembered having some of the most delicious meat of my life served inmore ways than you can imagine—roasted on long skewers, in outdoor pits, and jury-rigged barbecues at the town market. As much as I wascraving salads and vegetables after a few days, I told myself, when inSouth America, just indulge your inner carnivore. One of the most deli-cious ways to do that is with grilled steak seasoned with a traditional Argentinian warmed herb-and-olive-oil sauce called chimichurri. As you may have realized by now, I am on the constant prowl for new olive-oil-and-herb-based sauces. Something about the way that silky olive oil and the brightness and power-packed flavor of fresh herbs meldwith meat juices is so perfectly balanced for my palate. The oil turns thenatural juices into a sauce, and the herbs lift and counter the richness ofthe meat. But, whereas I tend toward the “soft” herbs, such as parsley,mint, and cilantro, in my herb salsas, chimichurri is made with tougher,more sturdy, dark-and-earthy-flavored members of the herb family. Rose- mary, thyme, oregano, and even bay leaf are minced and warmed in olive
3 pounds hanger steak 3 teaspoons thinly sliced chile deárbol1 tablespoon cracked black pepper2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoonthyme leaves1 fresh jalapeño1 teaspoon oregano
½
teaspoon rosemary leaves1 bay leaf 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil,plus 3 tablespoons or so forbrushing the steak 1 tablespoon red- wine vinegar1
½
teaspoons sweet paprika 6 large bell peppers(about 3 pounds), julienned
¼
cup sliced garlic6 ounces cleaned arugula 2 tablespoons freshly squeezedlemon juice
½
pint cherry tomatoes,cut in half 1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley Kosher salt and freshly groundblack pepper

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