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AS UNTO THE LORD.pdf

AS UNTO THE LORD.pdf

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Published by glennpease
BY JAMES RUSSELL MILLER D.D.


A GREAT deal is said in the Scriptures about
serving the Lord. But how are we to serve
him? What kind of work comes under the head
of service? There are wrong impressions regard-
ing this. All suppose that they are serving the
Lord when they engage in specifically religious
exercises. After his day's work a man goes to a
prayer-meeting. He regards that as serving, but
does not think of calling his long day's secular
work by the same sweet designation. A woman
visits a sick neighbor in the afternoon, reads a few
passages and bows in prayer at her bedside. She
feels as she turns away that the Lord accepts that
as service, but she does not dare to think of her
long morning's work at home in burdensome
household duties or among her children, mending,
patching, teaching, comforting, as of the same
sacred character.
BY JAMES RUSSELL MILLER D.D.


A GREAT deal is said in the Scriptures about
serving the Lord. But how are we to serve
him? What kind of work comes under the head
of service? There are wrong impressions regard-
ing this. All suppose that they are serving the
Lord when they engage in specifically religious
exercises. After his day's work a man goes to a
prayer-meeting. He regards that as serving, but
does not think of calling his long day's secular
work by the same sweet designation. A woman
visits a sick neighbor in the afternoon, reads a few
passages and bows in prayer at her bedside. She
feels as she turns away that the Lord accepts that
as service, but she does not dare to think of her
long morning's work at home in burdensome
household duties or among her children, mending,
patching, teaching, comforting, as of the same
sacred character.

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Published by: glennpease on Oct 30, 2013
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AS UNTO THE LORD.BY JAMES RUSSELL MILLER D.D." I must pray to God that somebody else may do whateverI leave undone. But I shall not have any right to that prayerunless I do my duty wherever I see it." — Edward Garrett.A GREAT deal is said in the Scriptures aboutserving the Lord. But how are we to servehim? What kind of work comes under the headof service? There are wrong impressions regard-ing this. All suppose that they are serving theLord when they engage in specifically religiousexercises. After his day's work a man goes to aprayer-meeting. He regards that as serving, butdoes not think of calling his long day's secularwork by the same sweet designation. A womanvisits a sick neighbor in the afternoon, reads a fewpassages and bows in prayer at her bedside. Shefeels as she turns away that the Lord accepts thatas service, but she does not dare to think of herlong morning's work at home in burdensomehousehold duties or among her children, mending,98AS UNTO THE LORD. 99patching, teaching, comforting, as of the samesacred character.And yet it is possible for us to do the simplest,most prosaic of these things in such a way as torender acceptable service to the Lord. The ques-
 
tion, then, arises, How are we to perform thesecommon secular duties so as to make them pleas-ing to Christ as ministries to him?First of all, our lives must be truly consecratedto Christ. If they are not, the most magnificentservices will not be accepted. Then the work wedo must be the work to which he calls us at thetime. Something else than our present duty,though requiring more toil and appearing moresplendid, will not be pleasing while present dutyis left unperformed. A missionary journey toJoppa will not be accepted as a substitute for asimilar visit to Nineveh. Prayer will not be asweet savor if at the moment there is a humanneed crying for help unheeded. Running to Dor-cas-meetings and temperance societies or attend-ing noonday prayer-meetings will not win thesmile of approval while home-duties are neg-lected.Then the work we do must itself be pure andgood work in a lawful and proper calling. No100 WEEK-DAY RELIGION.formal consecration can make any wrong-doingpleasing to the Master.Then, again, we must do our work well. Work that we slight or do dishonestly is not acceptableservice. This phase of Christian duty is some-times overlooked. Those who would not utter afalse word or commit a dishonest act will yet per-form their work carelessly or imperfectly. Theprinciples of religion apply just as well to the car-penter's trade or to the tailor's or to the house-keeper's work as to the business of the banker or
 
the merchant. It is just as really dishonest to sewup a seam that will rip or to put inferior materialor bad workmanship into a building as it is to usea short yardstick or light weights or to adulteratecoffee or sugar. God is not pleased with any work unless it is the very best that we can render.The old cathedral- builders understood this whenthey finished every smallest detail of their stupen-dous fabrics as conscientiously as the most massiveparts. The gilded spires, far away in the clouds,which no human eye could ever inspect, were madewith as much care as the altar-mouldings or thecarvings on the great doors, which all should see.They slighted nothing because it was not to be ex-posed to human gaze. They wrought for the greatAS UNTO THE LORD. 101Taskmaster's eye. " Why carve you so carefully thetresses of that statue's head?" asked one of anancient sculptor as he wrought with marvelouspains on the back part of the figure. " The statuewill stand high up in its niche, with its back to thewall, and no one will see it." — " Ah ! the gods willsee it," was the sublime answer. So must wework if we would render pleasing service to theLord. The builder must build as conscientiouslyin the parts that are to be covered from sight as inthose that will be most conspicuous. The dress-maker must sew as faithfully the hidden seams asthe most showy. I do not believe that we canever serve Christ acceptably by any kind of shams or deceits.If we do our secular work thus, it will be accept-able to the Lord as service rendered to him. Itmay be impossible with each separate act to have

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