Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
FM 34-60 Military Counterintelligence

FM 34-60 Military Counterintelligence

Ratings:

4.67

(3)
|Views: 404|Likes:
Published by oblivionboyj

More info:

Published by: oblivionboyj on Aug 02, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/11/2014

pdf

text

original

 
FIELD MANUAL
NO. 34-60
*FM 34-60
HEADQUARTERSDEPARTMENT OF THE ARMYWashington, DC, 3 October 1995
COUNTERINTELLIGENCE
DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
*This publication supersedes FM 34-60, 5 February 1990.
i
 
FM 34-60
ii
 
FM 34-60
This chapter implements STANAG 2844 (Edition Two)
Chapter 1
MISSION AND STRUCTURE
GENERAL
Threat intelligence services have the capability to conduct continuouscollection against the US Army during peacetime, operations other thanwar (OOTW), and during war itself. The intelligence that results fromthese operations provides a significant advantage to threat forces, andcould easily result in increased US casualties on the battlefield.Fortunately, there are many actions we can take to counter threatintelligence efforts and to provide force protection to all US Army units.The most dramatic of these actions are designed to neutralize enemy
collection. These actions include—
Using field artillery to destroy ground-based enemy signalsintelligence (SIGINT) collectors.Conducting sophisticated C-HUMINT operations in a foreign city long before overt hostilities commence.Employing direct fire weapon systems to destroy enemy
reconnaissance. Brigades conducting defensive operations at the
National Training Center often commit a tank-infantry company teamto provide counterreconnaissance, intelligence, surveillance, andtarget acquisition (C-RISTA) protection.While not as flashy, routine security procedures provide crucial forceprotection. These procedures include but are not limited to—Personnel security, to include background investigations, will ensureall personnel who have access to sensitive or classified information
will fully protect it.
Information security, particularly in regard to handling classified andcompartmented information, will be a challenging field in the futureconsidering the ease with which information can be copied andtransmitted in an increasingly automated Army.
1-1

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->