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A FAITHFUL SERVANT.pdf

A FAITHFUL SERVANT.pdf

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Published by glennpease
BY JOSEPH A. SEISS, D.D., LL.D.,




His Lord said unto him, Well done, good and faithful servant ;
thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over
many things; enter thou into the joy of thy lord. — Matt. 25 : 23.
BY JOSEPH A. SEISS, D.D., LL.D.,




His Lord said unto him, Well done, good and faithful servant ;
thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over
many things; enter thou into the joy of thy lord. — Matt. 25 : 23.

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Published by: glennpease on Oct 30, 2013
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A FAITHFUL SERVANTBY JOSEPH A. SEISS, D.D., LL.D.,His Lord said unto him, Well done, good and faithful servant ;thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler overmany things; enter thou into the joy of thy lord. — Matt. 25 : 23.THIS was one of the servants in the Sa-viour's Parable of the Talents, whereHe compares the kingdom of heaven toa man travelling into a far country, whocalled his servants and delivered nnto them hisgoods, giving to each a certain number of talentswith which to trade and get gain until he shouldreturn.The servants of those times were mostly personscaptured in war, and often were people of intelli-gence, skill, and business capacity. Except thattheir lords had property in them, and had theright to command them, they were not at all tobe confounded with the slaves with which weused to be familiar. Nor was it uncommon forone and another of these ancient masters to letout their money or properties to the sole manage-ment and control of their servants to do businessfor the mutual profit of owner and servant. Andit is a servant of this description that is here inview.297298 A FAITHFUL SKKVANT.
 
The Saviour would teach nsthat it is after thismanner He deals with lis as His servants. Allmen are His; but He does not hold nor force themas slaves. He does not lash them to their tasks.He gives them liberty of action. He lets or de-livers to them certain talents, which they are freeto use as they deem best, only that they mustaccount to Him for them in the end.This servant had been entrusted with five tal-ents, a very large sum of money. It was doublethe amount given to another servant, and five toone of what was given to a third.God does not give to every one alike. Thereare often very wide diversities. Some are richand some are poor. Some have much and othershave but little. And yet these distributions arenot arbitrary or capricious. They are made on a just principle, — " to every man according to hisseveral ability." Each gets as much as he canhandle.These "talents" include all our endowments,faculties, powers, possessions, and means and op-portunities for profiting ourselves and others,and for securing gain for the great Master.There are diversities of gifts. "To one is giventhe word of wisdom ; to another, the word of knowledge ; to another, faith ; to another, thegift of healing ; to another, the working of miracles ; to another, prophecy ; to another, thediscerning of spirits ; to another, divers kinds of tongues; to another, the interpretation of tongues. "And as with these spiritual gifts, so in respect toFIRST SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY. 299
 
natural capacity, culture, fortune, office, relations,and positions in the world ; all of which are par-celled out according to the divine will and good-ness. And all these together constitute the tal-ents with which the great Master has entrusted us.This servant made good use of what he had re-ceived. It was meant that he should use thesetalents and trade with them, and he did it.And this is what our lyord intends for us to dowith our gifts and talents. Whether they begreat or small, many or few, they are meant foractive, earnest, and gainful use. The Lord ingiving them means business^ — honest, resolved,faithful, and soul-engaging business. When par-ents give their children capital, it is not that theymay waste it, bury it, or throw it away on idleprodigality ; but that they may go into businesswith it, invest it in profitable trade, make theirfortunes out of it, and be able to give a good ac-count of it to the credit and joy of all concerned.And so the divine command with regard to thepounds and talents given us is: " Occupy till Icome^'^'' — use them, work out of them all the profityou can.Just what sort of business this servant did isnot told; nor is it prescribed to us precisely howand where we are to lay hold in order to make themost of our talents. In general, the opportunitieslie all around us, in such spheres of life as Provi-dence has assigned us, or to which He seems tobe calling us. We are where we are, and havewhat we have, that we may act and do profitable300 A FAITHFUL SERVANT.

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