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Case Studies UNDP: MAASAI WILDERNESS CONSERVATION TRUST, Kenya

Case Studies UNDP: MAASAI WILDERNESS CONSERVATION TRUST, Kenya

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Published by UNDP_Environment
Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust (MWCT) preserves the wilderness, wildlife, and cultural heritage of the Amboseli-Tsavo ecosystem – an important migration corridor between two national parks. The organization of Maasai communities has mitigated unsustainable practices such as overgrazing and water-intensive farming and introduced alternative livelihood options, including ecotourism. The community benefits from lease payments for conservancy zones, watershed protection, and the provision of ecotourism services.

An innovative program called ‘Wildlife Pays’ uses ecotourism surcharges to compensate Maasai herders on a quarterly basis for losses due to wildlife predation. The organization employs more than 100 community rangers and predator monitors, and maintains a formal partnership with the Kenya Wildlife Service. Ecotourism revenues fund community health and education programs, including secondary school scholarships, teacher salaries, and clean water access. An innovative partnership model has allowed for both local livelihood improvements and extensive wildlife monitoring to improve the protection of threatened species.
Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust (MWCT) preserves the wilderness, wildlife, and cultural heritage of the Amboseli-Tsavo ecosystem – an important migration corridor between two national parks. The organization of Maasai communities has mitigated unsustainable practices such as overgrazing and water-intensive farming and introduced alternative livelihood options, including ecotourism. The community benefits from lease payments for conservancy zones, watershed protection, and the provision of ecotourism services.

An innovative program called ‘Wildlife Pays’ uses ecotourism surcharges to compensate Maasai herders on a quarterly basis for losses due to wildlife predation. The organization employs more than 100 community rangers and predator monitors, and maintains a formal partnership with the Kenya Wildlife Service. Ecotourism revenues fund community health and education programs, including secondary school scholarships, teacher salaries, and clean water access. An innovative partnership model has allowed for both local livelihood improvements and extensive wildlife monitoring to improve the protection of threatened species.

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Published by: UNDP_Environment on Oct 30, 2013
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Equator Initiative Case Studies
Local sustainable development solutions for people, nature, and resilient communities
Kenya
 
MAASAI WILDERNESSCONSERVATION TRUST
Empowered lives.Resilient nations.
 
UNDP EQUATOR INITIATIVE CASE STUDY SERIES
Local and indigenous communities across the world are advancing innovative sustainable development solutions that work or people and or nature. Few publications or case studies tell the ull story o how such initiatives evolve, the breadth o their impacts, or how they change over time. Fewer still have undertaken to tell these stories with community practitionersthemselves guiding the narrative. To mark its 10-year anniversary, the Equator Initiative aims to ll this gap. The ollowing case study is one in a growing seriesthat details the work o Equator Prize winners – vetted and peer-reviewed best practices in community-based environmentalconservation and sustainable livelihoods. These cases are intended to inspire the policy dialogue needed to take local successto scale, to improve the global knowledge base on local environment and development solutions, and to serve as models orreplication. Case studies are best viewed and understood with reerence to ‘
, a compendium o lessons learned and policy guidance that draws rom the case material.
Click on the map to visit the Equator Initiative’s searchable case study database.
 Editors
Editor-in-Chie:
Joseph Corcoran
Managing Editor:
Oliver Hughes
Contributing Editors:
Dearbhla Keegan, Matthew Konsa, Erin Lewis, Whitney Wilding
Contributing Writers
Edayatu Abieodun Lamptey, Erin Atwell, Jonathan Clay, Joseph Corcoran, Sean Cox, Larissa Currado, David Godrey, Sarah Gordon,Oliver Hughes, Wen-Juan Jiang, Sonal Kanabar, Dearbhla Keegan, Matthew Konsa, Rachael Lader, Erin Lewis, Jona Liebl, Mengning Ma,Mary McGraw, Brandon Payne, Juliana Quaresma, Peter Schecter, Martin Sommerschuh, Whitney Wilding
Design
Sean Cox, Oliver Hughes, Dearbhla Keegan, Matthew Konsa, Amy Korngiebel, Kimberly Koserowski, Erin Lewis, John Mulqueen, Lorenade la Parra, Brandon Payne, Mariajosé Satizábal G.
Acknowledgements
 The Equator Initiative acknowledges with gratitude MWCT, and in particular the guidance and inputs o Ms. Kira Siebert, Communicationsand Development Coordinator. All photo credits courtesy o MWCT. Maps courtesy o CIA World Factbook and Wikipedia.
Suggested Citation
United Nations Development Programme. 2013.
Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust, Kenya
. Equator Initiative Case Study Series. NewYork, NY.
 
PROJECT SUMMARY
Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust preserves thewilderness, wildlie and cultural heritage o the Amboseli- Tsavo ecosystem an important migration corridor betweentwo national parks. The organization o Maasai communitieshas mitigated unsustainable practices such as overgrazingand water-intensive arming and introduced alternativelivelihood options, including ecotourism. The communitybenets rom lease payments or conservancy zones,watershed protection, and the provision o ecotourismservices. Ecotourism revenue unds community health andeducation programmes, including scholarships, teachersalaries and clean water.An innovative programme called ‘Wildlie Pays’ compensatesMaasai herders on a quarterly basis or losses due towildlie predation in exchange or their participation inconservation activities. An innovative partnership modelwith the Kenya Wildlie Service has allowed or both locallivelihood improvements and extensive wildlie monitoringto improve the protection o threatened species.
KEY FACTS
EQUATOR PRIZE WINNER: 2012FOUNDED: 2000LOCATION: Chyulu Hills, Amboseli-Tsavo regionBENEFICIARIES: Kuku Group RanchBIODIVERSITY: 12,000 acres across two conservancies
3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Background and Context4Key Activities and Innovations6Biodiversity Impacts8Socioeconomic Impacts8Policy Impacts9Sustainability10Replication11Partners11
MAASAI WILDERNESS CONSERVATIONTRUST
Kenya

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