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LuckyPDF - New Narrative

LuckyPDF - New Narrative

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Published by LuckyPDF
LuckyPDF - New Narrative
LuckyPDF - New Narrative

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Published by: LuckyPDF on Oct 30, 2013
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02/23/2014

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LuckyPDF isan artist groupbased in South-East London but active worldwide, running since 2008.The group is made up o James Early, John Hill, OllieHogan, and Yuri Pattison primarily, with an extendednetwork. Working collaboratively with an ever-changing network o emerging artists, they produceonline television programs, live events, and Internetand media interventions. Most o the work they showis video, perormance, or new media art, many o theartists are rom London and o their generation.LuckyPDF have produced two Internet television mini-series, the frst in collaboration with Auto Italia (2010), the second, commissioned or Frieze Projects (2011).They produced the short flm
The Conservatory 
(2011)live at the Barbican, London and participated in the Venice Biennale, the Athens Biennale, and were inresidence at SPACE Studios and The Woodmill, London.In 2012 they were awarded second place in theinaugural Samsung Art+ award and were eatured as the frst Dazed and Conused magazine residency. InMarch LuckyPDF ounded
School of Global Art 
or theGlobal Art Forum 6, Art Dubai.
www.uckypdf.com
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 with, perhaps this is because I’malways excited by new practices;an art school can be a terribly conservative and insular place orthe development o art, it’s muchmore interesting talk to peopleoutside o that context and to carry on exploring and developing new ideas and working relationships. Wemostly work with our peer group o  young artists in London and on theInternet. We sometimes work withpeople more senior than us in the art  world but mostly it’s about being ableto collaborate on a level so that it’smutually interesting and rewarding.
Oll HOg:
I think perhaps what’s was more inuential was being in Peckham circa 2008–9 at this time there were multiple artists,galleries, and curatorial groups allputting on their own events andexhibitions. This level o competitionI think pushed us to this, past thenormal university to job / careerpath mentality.
JOH Hll:
I think we all came out 
Can you spend a minute andte me what luckyPDF is eay?let’s stat with how luckyPDF ottoethe in Peckham.Oll HOg:
It started out o a want to keep/urther the communitthat university gave us and createour own space in order to make the work we enjoyed, through a rejectiono what we perceived the existing London scene was oering.
J rl:
LuckyPDF projects have been the congregation point or many artists to develop ideasand explore new methods orcollaboratively producing work. Wemet locally in Peckham, where we were all living and through a shareddesire to sel-determine our careersstarted to work together as a way o mutually supporting practice. Weare interested in the outreach o art and hope to reach a large audience; we think this is a responsibility o theartist/producer. We have exploredmany dierent methods or themaking and dissemination o ideas,and have employed mainstreamdistribution strategies in thispursuit. Since 2009 this has includedart shows, publications, online TV shows, parties, and an en-masseexpedition to Venice!
 r PO:
I think Jamessummed it up, but basically it’s all been moving steadily towards stock market oatation.
t seems ike you a aduatedfom nivesity of the tslondon. Can you te me how thatconnection inks to coectivecoaboation as pat of you atpactice? How do you usuaymeet atists?J rl:
 Yes, apart rom Yuri, he went to Goldsmiths. We haven’t really collaborated with any o thepeople I graduated rom Chelseao art school realising how little we knew. LuckyPDF has been our way o learning rom each other, but doing things together.
 r PO:
I went toGoldsmiths, which is an entirely dierent art school brand to UAL,and I think in general a wider socialscene caused us to start working together and also dictated the kind o people we were interested in working  with. In general it’s pretty unclear how we meet people, we seem tomore and more all into knowing good artists, however I’m constantly looking out or people making new and exciting art (even i it is to scopeout the competition). But I also think  we tend to very outwardly show enthusiasm and support or anyonemaking interesting work, and I’ve been told this is actually quite a rarecharacteristic.
he ecent exhibition remoteConto at the C in londonceay addessed how teevisionshapes contempoay cutueand aso hihihted a numbe ofatists who ae espondin to themedium’s diita conveence.luckyPDF did the openin eventby tansfomin the theateinto he choo of goba tenoment ofce. Can you peasete me about you eationship toV cutue? Do you ike eaity V?J rl:
 We used theopportunity at the ICA to sign upsome new recruits to our new school,The School o Global Art, most notably the reality TV star ChloeSims rom The Only Way is Essex. We’ve been interested in TV or a while and this was a great t; it was very interesting to us to bring Chloeinto the art world and extend thenarrative o her story, a theatre inpublic media, into the artspace o theICA. This meant that our artwork could also enter the public space asshe was photographed or tabloidnewspapers. Personally I think that reality TV has become quite boring, it’s saturated by the samestereotypes and clichés and is rarely surprising. I am ascinated by thegrip that it has on us socially and that the lines o reality and ction arein constant ux, and seemingly thelives o its players are at the mercy o the public.
JOH Hll:
 We’re almost at the stage where everyone can make live T with their phone; what your watching 
James Early o LuckyPDF &Chloe Sims o eality TV show
The Only Way Is Essex 
or theopening o emote Control at the ICA, London 2012
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live Fom Fieze,this is luckyPDF V (london, 2011)
Highlights o Live FromFrieze, this is LuckyPDF TV,commissioned by FriezeFoundation or FriezeProjects 2011. Four days ohour long live TV broadcastswere streamed rom FriezeArt Fair.
tis:
aaël ozendaal,Boyle and Shaw, PetraCortright, Daniel Swan, TaiShani, Frances Scott, ichardSides, Paul Pieroni, YBT, DanSzor and ael Stone, JeremyBailey, Lucy Stokton, EdFornieles, Callum Hill andMartin ohout.
and why your watching it becomesmuch more important.
 r PO:
I think American(and to a degree European) reality TV has become so ridiculousthat ideas we’ve joked about keepappearing as ully realised shows onour screens, Bravo’s Gallery Girls being the latest (wonderul) example.I think “Reality TV” at thisstage is very much a complex new art orm imitating reality as reality rather than as art. And we simply can’t compete, unless someone wanted to make a show about LuckyPDF… which would be really ideal at this stage.
 ou have coaboated withmiions of atists in youexhibitions o pojects. What do you nd the most inteestin andwhat is the most unbeaabe?J rl:
Not quite millions, but the list is long and distinguished.I think we all benet rom being introduced to dierent people’spractices, it’s oten really exciting to see a new perspective and I think the more we diversiy the more tools we have to nd interesting solutionsto problems. I think we all thrivein and relish high-stress situations,so although being accountable toother people, their ideas, and egoscan be endlessly rustrating, I think  we all eel that it can be a ertile bedor developing great projects andultimately that’s the most important thing to us.
 r PO:
I think the most interesting parts have been trying things ar beyond our qualicationsand skills, learning on the job andnding out that the outcome isalmost never ailure . . . Our project or Frieze, working with ty artists, was a massive undertaking, but  working with people to somehow achieve something way beyond thesum o the participants is alwaysan amazing eeling, it’s what’s goodabout collaboration.Ollie Hogan: Getting away with it/not getting away with it?
 ou have paticipated in the thens Biennae and a coupeof esidencies in eboune andottinham. Can you te me how you wok has deveoped?J rl:
I’d like to think that  we’ve streamlined certain partso our operation but actually we
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