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Illinois Senate Race 2004

Illinois Senate Race 2004

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Published by Juan del Sur
Alan Keyes and Barack Obama Debate
Hosted by Illinois Radio Network

October 12, 2004

JIM ANDERSON, MODERATOR: From the historic state capitol in Springfield, Illinois, this is the U.S. candidates' radio debate. Our candidates are Democratic State Senator Barack Obama and Republican former Ambassador Alan Keyes.

I'm Jim Anderson of the Illinois Radio Network, and I will be joined in questioning the candidates by Craig Dellimore, political editor of WBBN Newsradio in Chicago, and Mike Flannery, political reporter for channel 2 of Chicago.

Craig, tell us the rules.

CRAIG DELLIMORE, MODERATOR: Well, Mike Flannery, Jim Anderson and I will ask questions that we have chosen for this debate. We may also follow up. There are no set time limits for the answers. We hope that that will allow for more of a discussion of the issues, but we also want the two candidates to say what they have to say, and no more. If the candidate is not answering the question or repeatedly plowing the same rhetorical turf, we do reserve the right to nudge things along.
Alan Keyes and Barack Obama Debate
Hosted by Illinois Radio Network

October 12, 2004

JIM ANDERSON, MODERATOR: From the historic state capitol in Springfield, Illinois, this is the U.S. candidates' radio debate. Our candidates are Democratic State Senator Barack Obama and Republican former Ambassador Alan Keyes.

I'm Jim Anderson of the Illinois Radio Network, and I will be joined in questioning the candidates by Craig Dellimore, political editor of WBBN Newsradio in Chicago, and Mike Flannery, political reporter for channel 2 of Chicago.

Craig, tell us the rules.

CRAIG DELLIMORE, MODERATOR: Well, Mike Flannery, Jim Anderson and I will ask questions that we have chosen for this debate. We may also follow up. There are no set time limits for the answers. We hope that that will allow for more of a discussion of the issues, but we also want the two candidates to say what they have to say, and no more. If the candidate is not answering the question or repeatedly plowing the same rhetorical turf, we do reserve the right to nudge things along.

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Published by: Juan del Sur on Aug 03, 2009
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~ ILLINOIS SENATE RACE 2004 ~
DEBATE ONE:
ALAN KEYESBARACK OBAMA
 
 
2004 DEBATE ONE: ALAN KEYES AND BARACK OBAMA
AlanKeyes.com 
 
~ 2 ~
Alan Keyes and Barack Obama DebateHosted by Illinois Radio Network
~~~
October 12, 2004
JIM ANDERSON, MODERATOR: From the historic state capitol in Springfield, Illinois, this isthe U.S. candidates' radio debate. Our candidates are Democratic State Senator Barack Obamaand Republican former Ambassador Alan Keyes.I'm Jim Anderson of the Illinois Radio Network, and I will be joined in questioning thecandidates by Craig Dellimore, political editor of WBBN Newsradio in Chicago, and MikeFlannery, political reporter for channel 2 of Chicago.Craig, tell us the rules.CRAIG DELLIMORE, MODERATOR: Well, Mike Flannery, Jim Anderson and I will ask questions that we have chosen for this debate. We may also follow up. There are no set timelimits for the answers. We hope that that will allow for more of a discussion of the issues, but wealso want the two candidates to say what they have to say, and no more. If the candidate is notanswering the question or repeatedly plowing the same rhetorical turf, we do reserve the right tonudge things along.And moving right along, our first question comes from Jim Anderson.ANDERSON: Ambassador Keyes, the U.S. has armed forces in Iraq. How long will they staythere, and when should they get out, and how should we get them out?ALAN KEYES, (R) ILLINOIS U.S. SENATE CANDIDATE: I think they stay there until theyget the job done. I know that John Kerry is preoccupied with an exit strategy, but as I've beentelling folks lately, if you get into a battle and the only thing you're thinking about is how to getout, I think we have a word for you—and it's not very complimentary.We are engaged in a war . . .MODERATOR: What is the word?
 
2004 DEBATE ONE: ALAN KEYES AND BARACK OBAMA
AlanKeyes.com 
 
~ 3 ~KEYES: We are engaged in a war against terror that was started by the terrorists, that claimedthe lives of thousands of Americans, that involves a global infrastructure of insidious individuals.We have seen the work they do, in Russia and elsewhere, against innocent lives in the mostbestial fashion possible.To fight that war, as I learned in my experience when I was on the National Security Councilstaff working directly on the problem of terrorism, it is not sufficient to have rhetoric, it is notsufficient to react after the fact. You have got to preemptively move against their bases, againsttheir sources of supply, against their training camps, against the states the provide them with safehaven and infrastructure. If you do not, then they will simply prepare for further attacks.And in a world where we have weapons of mass destruction, it's not good enough to say that,"Well, if there's a 50% chance that they could use them, I will act"—because once one suchattack succeeds, we could end up losing tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of people.I think that G.W. Bush has done the correct thing. He has moved preemptively in Afghanistan,he moved preemptively in Iraq—acting not on the wisdom of hindsight but on the foresight thatis required in order to make sure that the American people will not again suffer even worsedamage from this kind of insidious attack. And I think we ought to stay there until our nationalsecurity purposes are served.One point. We ought to understand that the national security objective is different than thepolitical objective. It is up to the people of Iraq, and we can work with other countries,internationally, to help them establish a regime that will be more respectful of human rights, thatwill never again become a base for terror or involved in the infrastructure of terror. But our mainobjective in which we have to act, whether we have cooperation or not, is to defend the securityand lives of our people.MODERATOR: Senator Obama, you were against the war, no doubt about it, before the warbegan. But now you're in favor of keeping troops there. How long?BARACK OBAMA, (D) ILLINOIS U.S. SENATE CANDIDATE: Well, let me first of all saythank you for hosting this debate.Ambassador Keyes and I agree on one thing, and that is that the War on Terror has to bevigorously fought. Where we part company is how to fight it, because I think Afghanistan in factwas not a preemptive war, it was a war launched directly against those who were responsible for9-11. Iraq was a preemptive war based on faulty evidence—and I say that not in hindsight, orMonday-morning quarterbacking. Six months before the war was launched, I questioned theevidence that would lead to us being there. Now, us having gone in there, I do think we nowhave a deep national security interest in making certain that Iraq is stable. If is it not stable, notonly are we going to have a humanitarian crisis, I think we are also going to have a huge nationalsecurity problem on our hands—because, ironically, it has become a hotbed of terrorists as a

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