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10-31-13

10-31-13

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Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Oct 31, 2013
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Brandishing signs covered in phrases like “I am not just a bud-get” and “Education shouldn’t be a debt sentence,” a group o Uni- versity students protested state budget cuts to higher education unding yesterday.Te group, led by the student organization KU Young Demo-crats, held their protest beore the  visit rom representatives o the Kansas House Appropriations and Senate Ways and Means committees met with Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little and other University officials.“It’s just not right,” said Eric Schum-acher, a senior rom opeka and vice pres-ident o KU Young Demo-crats, reerring to the high-er education budget cuts. “We simply believe this is the wrong time to be cutting ed-ucation, and it’s going to hurt the uture o the state.”Schumacher said, in contrast to the cuts made in Kansas, many states have recently increased unding or higher education.He added that he does not see many benefits coming rom the budgetary decisions made, and that they will instead “do more harm than good.”“Tese cuts are harmul,” Schumacher said. “Tey’re not going to improve our economy; they’re not going to improve lie or everyday Kansans, especially those being educated here.Ashley Lewandowski, a sopho-more rom Pittsburg and a pro-tester, said she thought the cuts to unding weren’t purely a fiscal decision. “It’s a reflection on the people who made the cuts,” Lewandows-ki said. “It shows that they don’t find education to be an important asset.”Schumacher added that “the at-titude coming rom government leaders is that students can shoul-der the burden o cutting costs,” and said the state should make sure students have the resources they need to graduate. “Tis plan makes your degree that much hard-er to obtain,” Schumacher said. “For a lot o students, they aren’t going to be able to afford it; their amily isn’t going to be able to afford it.”He said stu-dents may have to take out higher loan amounts and ace even more di-ficulty paying them back, thereby increasing their level o debt. Lewandowski added that an education is essential in getting hired or most jobs in the coun-try. She also said she questioned why the state would choose to make cuts toward something so important.“Education is something you need to prosper in this coun-try,” Lewandowski said. “It’s a key platorm or the uture and enables you to continue your dreams.”
— Edited by Duncan McHenry 
 Volume 126 Issue 39
kansan.com
 Thursday, October 31, 2013
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2BCROSSWORD 5ACRYPTOQUIPS 5AOPINION 4ASPORTS 1B SUDOKU 5A
T-showers. 70 percent chance of rain. Wind NNW at 14 mph.
It’s Halloween!
IndexDon’t forgetToday’s Weather
Take it or leaf it.
HI: 58LO: 38
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
WEEKEND
Disbelie, shock and worry were only a ew o the emotions that went through Hunter Sunder-meyer’s head when he ound out he needed sur-gery or a moderately severe heart arrhythmia.Afer years o distance running, a heart problem was the last thing he expected. He thought, “How does a 19-year-old athlete end up needing heart surgery?”In January, Sundermeyer, a sophomore rom Olathe, was told that two chambers o his heart were abnormally interconnected and it was caus-ing atrial fibrillation, which means those two chambers were beating out o sync. Te issue had to be fixed through surgery, and quickly.Just a week afer finding out about his condition, Sundermeyer was heading to the operating table. Tough the condition was dangerous, his young age meant the operation would be much simpler and the recovery time much shorter. But, even with this reassuring news, Sundermeyer was ter-rified going in.“Tey said it was low risk, but heart surgery is heart surgery,” Sundermeyer said. “It was really scary, but I had a really good support system with my riends and amily.”Te procedure itsel was airly simple; the surgeons went in laparoscop-ically, meaning they only made a ew small in-cisions in his chest, to separate the troublesome chambers by cauterizing them. Tis also meant they didn’t have to crack his sternum, which al-lowed or a aster recovery.Sundermeyer was ordered to rest or an entire month afer the surgery. He spent every day on the couch watching V and counting down the days until he would finally be able to run again.When his month o couch arrest was up he didn’t timidly dip his toes in the water — he  jumped right in and started training or a triath-lon. Sundermeyer said he realized that a heart sur-gery shouldn’t prevent him rom doing what he loves, and he wanted to put his newly fixed heart to good use. “Afer the surgery everybody treated me differ-ently, kind o delicately,” Sundermeyer said. “I wanted to do something to show everybody that I’m better than I was beore.On May 18, just 16 months afer the procedure, Sundermeyer will run in the Kansas City Sprint riathlon — a 500-meter swim, 10-mile bike ride and 5k run. Until then, he’s putting in several hours a week training hard at the gym. On a typical evening he will either run our miles, bike 16 miles or swim or an hour, plus some weightlifing on top o thatSundermeyer’s love or running started when he was a kid and has grown rom there. He ran cross-country in high school and has run several 5k races, which he said are his avorite events.“I love being able to get rom point A to point B using nothing but my own body,” Sundermeyer said. “I love to run to the top o the hill and look back at how ar I’ve gone with just my two legs.”In the time since his operation, those two legs have taken him rom the couch to his first triath-lon.As a pre-dental student, Sundermeyer’s course load is pretty heavy and finding time or training can be difficult. But he said as long as he can get in at least a small workout every night he’s work-ing toward his goal.He said he is certain about the decision to work hard and put his improved heart to the test, but his true goal is crossing that finish line in May.“Honestly I just want to finish,” Sundermeyer said. “I just want to get there and do as well as I can and show how ar I’ve come in a year.”
— Edited by Duncan McHenry 
ASHLEIGH TIDWELL
atidwell@kansan.com 
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com 
Going the distance
Student runner trains for triathlon after undergoing heart surgery
KATIE MCBRIDE/KANSAN
KU Young Democrats protest education budget cuts
Number crunch
“It’s a reflection on the people who made the cuts. It shows that they don’t find education to be an important asset.”
ASHLEY LEWANDOWSKIPittsburg sophomore
 
A StudentPOLL conducted by Art & Science Group ound that college rankings are becoming increasingly important to high school seniors. According to the survey, two-thirds o the 39,000 surveyed college applicants had taken rankings into account mak-ing their final decision. “Te most reliable source is taking an official campus visit to determine i the campus and pro-gram is right or the student,” said Lisa Kress, the director o admis-sions. “We particularly encourage students and amilies to do a deep dive on their academic program o interest as the quality o the indi- vidual program is more relevant than the rankings o the entire university.”Kress said college rankings should be used solely as a spring-board or students to start re-searching a college or university. Other important aspects to look into include affordability, academ-ic programs, study abroad, un-dergraduate research and making sure the school is a good fit aca-demically and socially.Te study ound that high school seniors look to US News & World Report as a predominant source or help, in addition to annual lists like Forbes op Colleges and Princeton Review.“It’s good to have comparison and a list is easy to look at,” said Conner Wade, a senior rom Cher-ry Creek High School in Denver, Colo.In a decision between a lesser- and well-known school, Wade said he would choose the bigger name because o the higher possibility o greater bonds and connections.“We ofen find that qualities re-lated to a college or university’s academic program, campus com-munity, and other distinctions ac-tor into students’ college decisions more than its rankings do,” wrote the principal o Art & Science Group, Richard A. Hesel, in the study.Winston Olsen, a senior rom Culver Academies in Indiana, is searching or schools based on location. He said the degree pro-grams, surrounding town and whether the school is a good fit is all important when making a final decision.According to the study, students with SA scores o 1300 and above were more likely to consult college rankings when applying than students with SA scores un-der 1300.“We work with students regard-less o what their backgrounds are and how they perceive the school based on rankings published in different publications,” said Ran-dall Brumfield, the director o ad- vising.
— Edited by Jessica Mitchell 
 
What:
 A Case for Social Resilience
When:
 Noon to 1 p.m.
Where:
706
 
Fraser Hall
About:
Informal talk on social resilience in Kansas with Robert Wuthnow
What:
Digital Wall Drawing: Halloween
When:
 4 to 5 p.m.
Where:
 Anschutz Library, Level 3
About:
 Spooky drawings, with optional costumes
What:
 Application for Fall Graduation Deadline
When:
 All day
Where:
 All university
About:
 Undergraduate and law school deadline for fall graduation
What:
 Deaf Education: Current Research and Issues
When:
 11 a.m.
Where:
 203 Joseph R. Pearson Hall
About:
 Lecture with Barbara Luetke
What:
REDCap
When:
1 to 4 p.m.
Where:
 445 Watson Library
About:
Seminar for researchers covering how to construct a REDCap database and survey
What:
Hear My Song, a Musical Revue
When:
7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where:
 Robert Baustian Theatre, Murphy Hall
About:
 Recital presented by the School of Music
What:
Women’s Basketball versus Emporia State
When:
 2 p.m.
Where:
 Allen Fieldhouse
About:
First women’s basketball game of the season
What:
 An Evening with Ted Owens
When:
 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Where:
 Kansas Union, Ballroom
About:
 Discussion with former men’s basket-ball coach Ted Owens about his career and new book
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison KohnDylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren ArmendarizHayley JozwiakElise ReuterMadison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole AnnebergAllyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013PAGE 2ACONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
 Jay?
 What’s the
FridaySaturdaySundayHI: 65HI: 57HI: 64LO: 37LO: 34LO: 44
— weather.com 
 
Sunny. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind WNW at 22 mph.Sunny. Zero percent of rain. Wind WNW at 12 mph.Mostly cloudly. Zero percent of rain. Wind SSE at 18 mph.
Gettin’ leafy wit’ it.Gettin’ leaer by the day.Baby, dont ‘leaf’ me.
Calendar
Tuesday, Oct. 31Friday, Nov. 1Saturday, Nov. 2Sunday, Nov. 3
www.HomesForLease.orgwww.HomesForLease.org
     
International Humanitarian Law Workshop
        
  
      
   
ENROLLMENT
AMELIA ARVESEN
aarvesen@kansan.com 
SCIENCE
Applying students consider school rankings 
JOSE MEDRANO
 jmedrano@kansan.com 
Professor finds biological cause of violent crime
Violent crimes are a serious issue or societies worldwide and can be unpredictable, but an experiment conducted by molecular biosci-ence proessor Dean Stetler ound a correla-tion between vi-olent crime and the low activity o a bodily enzyme.Te experiment ocused on in-mates in differ-ent correctional acilities and the activity o Monoamine Oxidase A Alleles (MAOA) in their bod-ies. According to Stetler, low-er-than-normal activity o the enzyme, coupled with abuse as a child, causes individuals to be in an aggressive mood and exhibit  violent behavior.MAOA exists first as a gene that codes or the MAOA enzyme, which metabolizes dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin — substances that promote human emotions such as happiness and contentment. “It causes people’s fight or flight sys-tems to be on a majority o the time,” said Stetler about the low activ-ity o MAOA. “Tese people are pissed off all the time.Inmates selected or the experi-ment were broken down into two groups — violent and nonviolent — and their genetic inorma-tion was gathered through cheek swabs. Te MAOA allele exam-ined was a specific type called the 3-repeat allele, which produces low amounts o MAOA. Inmates who had committed crimes such as murder, manslaughter, assault and rape were considered violent compared to inmates who had committed thef, drug use, the sale o drugs or had been convict-ed o other nonviolent crimes. Results showed 64.6 percent o male inmates who had committed a violent crime had the low-ac-tivity MAOA allele. Stetler said the alleles also seemed related to childhood abuse. Only 20.5 per-cent o the nonviolent inmates had the low-activity allele. Brunner Syndrome, a recessive disorder linked to the male X chromosome and caused by a lack o MAOA, was something Stetler looked at concerning low-activi-ty MAOA. It is essentially a more serious orm o decreased MAOA activity that has only been di-agnosed a handul o times, and causes extreme aggressiveness and impulsiveness. Te inmates exam-ined in the study, however, had lessened enzyme activity without qualiying as having Brunner Syn-drome.Stetler is currently looking to conduct more research on the is-sue, and stated he has other study ideas planned concerning MAOA.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry 
“[Low enzyme activity] causes people’s fight or flight systems to be on a majority of the time.”
DEAN STETLERmolecular bioscience professor
“...the quality of the individual program is more relevant than the rankings of the entire university.”
LISA KRESSDirector of admissions
AMELIA ARVESEN/KANSAN
Prospective students and their parents attend a student-led campus tour.
 
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3A
POLICE REPORTS
There will be a special Halloween Tea @ Three on the 4th floor lobby of the Kansas Union today. (@3:00)A 26-year-old male was arrested yesterday on the 2300 block of Iowa on suspicion of driving while intoxicated and no proof of liability insurance. A $750 bond was paid.A 25-year-old female was arrested Tuesday on the 3600 block of 25th Street on suspicion of theft by deception, third offense. A $1,000 bond was paid.
— Emily Donovan 
Information based on the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office booking recap.
SUBMIT YOUR BALLOT NOW AT WWW.KANSAN.COM/VOTE
 
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DON’T FORGET TO VOTE IN THIS YEARS TOP OF THE HILL TO NOMINATE THE BEST OF WRENCE
 
DON’T FORGET TO VOTE IN THIS YEARS TOP OF THE HILL TO NOMINATE THE BEST OF WRENCE
LAWRENCE
Cause of SafeBus and SafeRide decline unclear 
KU Parking & ransit recently announced a decline in ridership for SafeRide and SafeBus services compared to last year, marking the second year of decline for both.According to KU Parking & ransit, the department that over-sees both programs, the overall ridership for SafeBus’ four routes has declined 17.1 percent since last year. SafeRide ridership has declined a 29.9 percent.Drew Humphreys, the trans-portation coordinator for Student Senate, said the department is in- vestigating various reasons for the trend, looking into factors such as the increase in Lawrence Po-lice Department’s efforts to crack down on underage drinking, Safe-Bus’ service routes, and Universi-ty students’ level of awareness of both services.Scott Ross, a graduate student from Nevada, Mo., said he was un-aware of SafeRide, and didn’t use SafeBus because he lives on Mas-sachusetts Street, the central hub of all SafeBus routes.“If I didn’t live downtown I would probably use it,” Ross said.Mason Kilpatrick, a sophomore from Hutchinson, also said the location of where he lived af-fected how much he utilized SafeBus. “Tis year I live off-campus, so I hard-ly use the SafeBuses, but last year when I lived in the dorms I used it a lot on the weekends,“ Kilpat-rick said. “Cause I would make trips downtown, I would make trips to the Union and stuff like that late at night, so I would always use the SafeBus.”Kilpatrick also said the Safe-Bus’ green line runs through his off-campus living location, but because the route has no stops on the University campus, he uses the service less.Kilpatrick didn’t have personal experience with SafeRide, but has heard mixed things about it from friends. “Te in-stances I’ve heard about SafeRide ar-en’t very pos-itive, not in terms of the atmosphere of the ride, but in terms of the priority of customers,” Kilpatrick said. In order to address some of the decline in ridership of both ser- vices, KU Parking & ransit is looking at specific factors that have led to the decline and ate try-ing to address those concerns. “Te programs and services that we put out are reviewed each year,” Humphreys said. “We’ll be con-stantly looking at where our num-bers are at, and if there are oppor-tunities to put resources to better use, then we will do that.In the mean time, the depart-ment will increase their social media outreach and promotional efforts in order to inform students about the service.
— Edited by Hannah Barling 
MARK ARCE
marce@kansan.com 
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
SafeRide vehicles are small, compact cars. Unlike the SafeBus service, SafeRide only gives rides home. Both services have seen decreased ridership.
CAMPUS
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Architecture students gathered last night to participate in the American Institute of Architecture Students annual pumpkin carving contest. Te group asked members and non-members alike to gather and partake in pizza and put their design skills to the test.“Our organization has been doing this for many years now and every-one tends to have fun while taking a much-needed break from studio,” said Austin Griffis, president of AIAS.Using pumpkins donated by Hy-Vee, students armed with only their trusty box cutters and creative in-spiration carved jack-o-lanterns as scary as they are aesthetically ap-pealing.Te completed jack-o-lanterns were judged by architecture pro-fessors based on creative input as well as design skill. Te event also served as the kickoff for the fall event schedule for the AIAS. Te Kansan made it out to the event and caught up with some of the de-signers and their spooky works.
-— Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell
CALEB SISK 
csisk@kansan.com 
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Winning pumpkins are displayed by the Marvin Hall steps. Eric Winkler won first place with his “No-Face Pumpkin,” and second place went to Hannah Rupprecht and Danielle Latza’s “Spiral-Cut Pumpkin.”
Architecture school hostsjack-o-lantern contest
“The instances I’ve heard about SafeRide aren’t very positive, not in terms of the atmosphere of the ride, but in terms of the priority of the customers.”
MASON KILPATRICKHutchinson sophomore

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