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Faithfulness.pdf

Faithfulness.pdf

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Published by glennpease
BY JAMES RUSSELL MILLER D.D.

No higher praise can be given to any life
than to say it has been faithful. No one could
ask for a nobler epitaph than the simple words,
" He was faithful." This will be the commen-
dation given in the great account to those who
have made the most of their talents : " Thou
hast been faithful."
BY JAMES RUSSELL MILLER D.D.

No higher praise can be given to any life
than to say it has been faithful. No one could
ask for a nobler epitaph than the simple words,
" He was faithful." This will be the commen-
dation given in the great account to those who
have made the most of their talents : " Thou
hast been faithful."

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Published by: glennpease on Oct 31, 2013
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Faithfulness.
BY JAMES RUSSELL MILLER D.D.
With God there is no great nor smallSave as we yield him part or all.All that we are his claim demands — Spirit and brain and heart and hands jThen, be our lot however poor,Each dawn is as a welcome door ;Each humblest act the wondrous keyOf infinite opportunity.Dora Read Goodale.No higher praise can be given to any lifethan to say it has been faithful. No one couldask for a nobler epitaph than the simple words," He was faithful." This will be the commen-dation given in the great account to those whohave made the most of their talents : " Thouhast been faithful." Faithfulness should there-fore be the aim in all our living. It is not greatthings that God expects or requires of us, unlesshe has given us great gifts and opportunities; allhe requires is faithfulness. He gives us certaintalents, puts us in certain relations, assigns to uscertain duties, and then asks us to be faithful — 202Faithfulnessnothing more. The man with the plain giftsand the small opportunities is not expected to
 
do the great things that are required of the manwith the brilliant talents and the large oppor-tunities.We should get this truth fixed deeply in ourmind, that God asks of no one anything morethan simple faithfulness. Faithfulness is not thesame in any two persons. In the man who hasfive talents there must be a great deal more out-come to measure up to the standard of faithful-ness than in the man who has but two talents.Faithfulness is simply being true to God andmaking the most of one's life. Of those whohave received little, only little is required.Where much has been received much is re-quired. Never is anything impossible or un-reasonable expected of any one. If we aresimply faithful, we shall please God.Jesus said of Mary, after her act of love,when men murmured at her, " She hath donewhat she could." What had she done ? Verylittle, we would say. She loved Jesus truly anddeeply. Then she brought a flask of preciousointment and broke the flask, pouring the sacrednard upon her Lord's tired feet, those feet whichsoon were to be nailed to the cross. That wasone of the ways love was shown in those days.203Life's Byways and WaysidesWhat good did it do ? That was the questionthe disciples asked. We know it wonderfullycomforted the Saviour's sorrowful heart. Amidalmost universal hatred, here was one of hisfriends who believed in him still. Amid mad-
 
ding enmity here was one who loved him.While other hands were weaving a crown of thorns for his brow, to be put on him five dayshence, and others still were forging cruel nailsto drive through his feet, Mary's hands werepouring ointment on his head and bathing hisfeet with the nard. Who will say that Mary'sact did no good ? We cannot know how hersweet, pure, loyal love blessed that holy life inits anguish. It seemed a little thing, but littlething though it was, it gave the heart of Jesusa thrill of joy that made him stronger for all thedark, terrible days that followed, and for thatblackest, terriblest day of all, when he hung onthe cross.Call nothing little which gives comfort,strength, courage or cheer to a manly heart.A kindly hand-shake, when despair was wrap-ping a soul in folds of gloom, and driving it tomadness, saved a life from suicide. A sympa-thetic word, when one was about to yield to atemptation which would have left shame, dis-honor and ruin, rescued a soul and saved it for204Faithfulnesspurity, beauty and heaven. We do not knowwhat is little. What seems so small to us as tobe almost insignificant, may have infinite andeternal consequences, when all its harvest of results are gathered up in the judgment. " Shehath done what she could." That was blessedpraise for Mary. That is all Christ asks of anyof us — just the best we can do. He never asksanything we cannot do.

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