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Carrier 10:31.pdf

Carrier 10:31.pdf

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Published by Austiz Sumter
Including stories on: two new majors in development, the Rome Chiaha festival, BCAR's haunted house, the equestrian team wins at the Berry Fall Classic and much more.
Including stories on: two new majors in development, the Rome Chiaha festival, BCAR's haunted house, the equestrian team wins at the Berry Fall Classic and much more.

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Published by: Austiz Sumter on Oct 31, 2013
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10/31/2013

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OPINIONS 4FEATURES 6ENTERTAINMENT 8 SPORTS 10 
Students awarded Synovus Scholar grants
Two students have been awarded Synovus Scholar grants to pursue research projects with the guidance of their professors.The 2013 Synovus Scholars are sophomores Kayli Wilson, an economics major, and Micah Stockwell-Goering, an animal science major.The Synovus Scholar program awards up to $2,000 to Berry College sophomores and up to $500 for their faculty and staff mentors to help students pursue an academic or research experience, such as a practicum, research project, or artistic endeavor.Wilson is looking at data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey, which followed about 3700 households in rural China for several years and asked questions about their health, including their diets and vaccinations, and their educational levels. The goal of the survey is to “see the interrelationship of health and education,” Wilson said.Wilson is striving to learn more about how people of different educational levels may make different choices about health for themselves and for their families, Lauren Heller, assistant professor of economics and Wilson’s faculty advisor for the research project, said. While the survey focuses on Chinese families, “there might be some lessons we could learn for the U.S. as well,” Heller said.Wilson said that Heller encouraged her to apply for the Synovus Scholars program.“[Heller] had been working with a data set that I had some interest in too, so we looked at it together and came up with a research topic from it,” Wilson said.Wilson plans to use the funds from the Synovus program to  purchase Stata, a data analysis software, and to attend a Southern Economic Association conference next November to present her research. “It’s a rare thing for undergraduates to be able to present their work at this conference. Usually it’s Ph.D. economists,” Heller said.
Chiaha festival comes to RomeVikings Soccer victorious 
MEGAN REED
news editor
Two new majors currently in development
 New majors in creative technology and international business are in the process of
 becoming ofcial and available to students.
Each of the two new majors was created for a different purpose. John Grout, Dean of the Campbell School of Business, said international  business was created because of student and  prospective student interest.“The international business major was
developed because the admissions ofcers that
I meet with every summer gave me feedback indicating that it would be of interest to many students that they talk to,” Grout said. “We’re anxious to provide them with the kinds of things they are interested in.”The international business major is set to be a
fteen hour co-major and is coupled with other
existing business majors such as accounting,
management, marketing and nance.
Basil Englis, chair of the Campbell School of Business curriculum committee, said the major in international business is supposed to prepare students for the business world at a global  perspective.“The goal is to broaden student exposure to important international business issues and to foster greater knowledge and sensitivity to global social, environmental, economic and commercial issues,” Englis said.Grout said the goal of the international  business program is that students will learn about several different aspects of business from a global perspective. “I hope that they will learn how different cultures that they may encounter in the world can be taken into account when students manage organizations,” Grout said.Students of international business would take several business courses related to the topic directly as well as other government-type course relating to global politics and the international world.“All of the international business major courses come from either existing courses in international business or a list of options from the Evans school that involve international relations,” Grout said. Grout said students are also encouraged to take a foreign language. New foreign language classes will be created that focus on the language involved in business.The international business co-major has already been approved by the academic council and will begin in the fall of 2014.The creative technology major has yet to  be approved by the academic council, but it is currently in the process of being constructed. Nadeem Hamid, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, said he sparked interest in the creative technology major  because of a class that he taught in Physical Computing. This class caught the interest of Grout, who according to Hamid was also interested in the topic.The creative technology major is also being explored because of the board of trustees and administrations interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (S.T.E.M.) education.“We already have a great science program; we already have a really good math department,” Grout said. “So we could either go down an engineering track or a technology track; our
 belief is that a technology track would t better
with the liberal arts approach of the college than engineering would have.”Students in the proposed creative technology major would be expected to take classes across several different disciplines.“For the creative technologies class, it will be a variety of courses from across campus,” Grout said. “There will be business courses; there will  be computer science courses, and there will be creative technology courses.”
One specic course in the creative technology
major is a basic prototyping class, where students will utilize technology, such as 3-D printers to create objects.Students with a degree in creative technology are expected to be marketable in terms to employers.“I don’t know exactly what job they [the creative technology majors] are going to get, but I know that people with that set of talents is likely to get employers’ attention,” Grout said.Overall, Grout said that both of the new
majors will be benecial for students after their
undergraduate experience.“I think that both of these majors will create individuals who will be attractive for a variety of  positions,” Grout said.
October 31. 2013
vol. 104. #8
The Great Pumpkin
MATTHEW MURPHY
deputy news editor
p.10
SEE “GRANTS”, PG. 2 
“We’re anxious to provide them with the kinds of things they are interested in.”
-John Grout
p.8p.6
CHRISTIAN TURNER,
photojournalism editor
BERRY RECENTLY CHOSE sophomores Kayli Wilson (left) and Micah Stockwell-Goering (right) as Synovus Scholars.
 
RECKLESS DRIVING
On Oct. 23rd an unknown  person did “doughnuts” in the gravel lot at Frost Chapel and also the
adjacent eld.
THEFT
On Oct. 24th a student reported the theft of their  bike. The bike was located
 by ofcers a few hours later
and returned to the owner.
TRESPASS
On Oct. 29th, Two
non-afliated juveniles were found in the Possum Trot elds trying to ride a horse.
GONDOLIERS
THE BEST ITALIAN CUISINE IN ROME SINCE 1992
BUY ONEPIZZA
152 Shorter AveRome, GA 30165(Near Chick-Fil-A Dwarf House)
THURSDAY20% off FOOD1/2 SPECIALPRICE DRINKSMONDAY-FRIDAY$7.99 w/ SALA AND A DRINK.
706.291.8080gondolierspizzarome.comLIKE US ON FACEBOOK!
GET ONEFREE
COLLEGE NIGHTLUNCH SPECIALS10% OFF WITHBERRY ID
for students, faculty & staff 
TV’s for SPORTS!
Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pFriday & Saturday 11am-11p
Banquet Room available
Not Valid w/ Any Other Offe
DELIVERYAVAILABLEEVERY DAY
OVER 50 LUNCH SPECIALS
2
Viking Fusion continues to win multiple national collegiate media awards
Viking Fusion won College Media Association Pinnacle Awards at the 92nd Annual National Student Media Convention in New Orleans.This national honor in the category of “Best TV Promo and PSA” was awarded for a short promotional video. University of Hawaii and the University of South Dakota were
nalists in this category.
Senior Mary Claire Stewart received “Best Audio Slideshow”, another Pinnacle Award, for “The Treves Family: An Uncommon Story.” “I am excited and honored to represent Berry with this award,” said
Stewart, according to the Berry Ofce
of Public Relations. “I have to give credit to the entire team of faculty and students, because this project was really a team effort, and I couldn’t have done this without them. I never imagined the work we did would get such recognition. I’m so thankful that here at Berry we are given unique and meaningful opportunities for hands-on learning and experience.”Along with these awards, Viking Fusion was also named one of the country’s “50 Best Student Press Websites,” according to College Media Matters. Other schools on the list included: New York University, San Diego State University, Duke University, as well as many others.Fusion advisor Steven Hames said these awards can be credited to the staff.“It’s part of the continual growth of Fusion and the students,” Hames said. “We haven’t changed our philosophy.”The Fusion staff headed to San Antonio, Tex. on Wednesday to attend the National Student Electronic Media Convention, where they have been nominated for three more awards. Episode four of the television web series “Going Up,” produced by 2013 alumnus Nathan Sutton and junior Glenn Garrido-Olivar, was nominated for “Best Vodcast- Television.” Episode
ve was nominated for “Best General
Entertainment Program- Television.” The video “Roll Call,” which was  produced, directed and edited by senior Josy Roman, was nominated for “Best Vodcast-Television.”Garrido-Olivar said he did not expect this kind of recognition.“I didn’t expect it to get picked up because it was a show about two  people in an elevator,” Garrido-Olivar said.Fusion executive director Michael Baldvins said there are a few factors that went into the recognition Fusion is receiving.“I think it is a combination of a tradition of hard work and dedication from this year’s staff and the last that has come to be recognized,” Baldvins said.
 
PAUL WATSON
editor-in-chief 
Check out Viking Fusion next week for a full list of awards.
INTERESTED IN WORKING FOR THE CARRIER?
We are currently looking for a new Copy Editor. If you are interested contact campus_carrier@berry.edu and put in an application.
 
October 31, 2013
Swing N’ Scream 
On Oct. 31 from 6:30 to 8 p.m., students can pay $1 for one swing on the BOLD giant swing or $5 for six swings. The BOLD giant swing is located between Blackstone Hall and the Hoge Building. All proceeds will go to the Human Society.
Cyberbullying
Dr. Robin Kowalski, associate professor of psychology at Clemson University, will be speaking about cyberbullying on Nov. 1 from 5 to 6 p.m. in Green 306. CE
Stop Hunger Now 
The goal of this event hosted by the Wesley Foundation is to package 100,000 meals to send to schools all over the world. Meals will be packed in Krannert Ballroom on Nov. 1 from 5 to 10 p.m. and on Nov. 2 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
“In God’s Land”
The lm “In God’s Land” will be
screened in Evans Auditorium on Nov.
1 from 7 to 9:30 p.m. The lmmaker,
Pankaj Rishi Kumar, will be present to answer questions. CE
KCAB Skate Night
KCAB is hosting a skate night on Nov. 1 from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m. at Fun Wheels in Rome. Fun Wheels is located at 2606 Calhoun Road NE.
Twisted Koffeehouse
KCAB and the multicultural ofce are
hosting a Koffeehouse in the Krannert Ballroom on Nov. 2 from 9 p.m. to midnight.
Career Fair Prep
On Nov. 5 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. and again from 5 to 6 p.m. in Krannert 250, the Career Center will be helping students prepare for job fairs and career expos.
Florence Reed 
Florence Reed, president and founder
of Sustainable Harvest International,
will be speaking about sustainable farming in the Krannert Ballroom on  Nov. 5 from 8 to 10 p.m. CE
“Girl Rising”
The lm “Girl Rising”, which is about the movement for girls’ education in
non-Western cultures, will be screened in the Krannert Ballroom on Nov. 6 from 6 to 8 p.m.
Hoop Madness
The Berry cheerleaders, Vikettes and Platinum Streetballers will be  performing in the Cage Arena on Nov. 7 from 8 to 9:30 p.m. to celebrate the  beginning of the basketball season.
TODAY
PICTURE
DAY
IS
BE IN THE YEARBOOK
THURSDAY
OCTOBER 31
st
in
KRANNERT 246
9:00AM-1:30PM2:30PM-6:30PM7:30PM-8:30PM
LAST CHANCELAST CHANCE
BRINGYOURSMILE
THE BOOK ARRIVES IN APRIL
Outlaw receives award from Charter Fellows
Mary Outlaw, Senior Lecturer Emeritus in the department of teacher education, received this year’s 2013 Outstanding Service to the Profession of Teaching award.The award is given to teachers
who have made signicant
contributions to the profession of teaching. It is given by the Charter Fellows, a group of Berry alumni who graduated from the teacher education program and return to campus twice each year for professional development to renew their commitment to teaching
 
and for fellowship with other teachers.Outlaw has taught at Berry for 21 years and teaches two curriculum and methods courses for early childhood education majors.Outlaw said you do not always know the difference your teaching makes for someone in the teaching profession, so recognition of outstanding service is treasured.As an educator at Berry, Outlaw’s goal is to prepare the best teachers in Georgia, the southeast and beyond.
“Reecting on the last ten to
twelve years of teaching, team teaching has been a key feature in the courses I have taught at Berry,” Outlaw said. “The mission—not to be ministered unto, but to minister—are features with which I
nd a nice philosophical t.”
Jacqueline McDowell, dean of the Charter School of Education and Human Sciences, said Outlaw has made outstanding contributions
to the eld of teacher education and
has developed effective methods for preparing teachers to teach in the classroom.“Dr. Outlaw is a trusted colleague, outstanding advisor of undergraduate students and a professor who loves working with college students as well as children in the community,” McDowell said.
BRITTNI TROLLINGER
staff reporter
CHRISTIAN TURNER,
 
photojournalism editor
SENIOR LECTURER EMERITUS IN THE TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT MARY OUTLAW HAS BEEN AWARDED the 2013 Outstanding Service to the Profession of Teaching award.
3
Creature Feature
To celebrate Halloween, KCAB and Viking Fusion will be showing the
horror lm “Insidious” on Oct. 31 at 9
 p.m. in the Ford Dining Hall.
Grants
CONTINUED FROM PG. 1
Stockwell-Goering, who
is working with Jay Daniel, associate professor of animal science, is focusing her research  project on the role of the hormone grehlin in castrated
male sheep. Grehlin is made by
the stomach and stimulates feed intake. This hormone is also found in humans.
“There was a study in
 people where they showed them  pictures of food and grehlin
[levels] went up,” Daniel said. “We wanted to see if a similar
concept would work in animals where if they saw things that made them think they were going to eat, that that would
make grehlin go up too.”
To test this theory, Stockwell-
Goering and Daniel gathered a
group of sheep and put muzzles on some of them. A bucket of food was then placed near the sheep, but the sheep wearing muzzles could not eat. The experiment was also done at a feeding time that was unfamiliar to the sheep. The experiment was  performed on castrated male sheep to eliminate the possible interference of sex hormones.
Stockwell-Goering and Daniel
worked on a similar experiment last year involving pregnant female sheep, and Stockwell-
Goering said that may have inuenced their results. Stockwell-Goering used
the funds from the grant to  purchase the materials for the experiment, which included syringes and 6 mL tubes, and a fee to have the materials analyzed at the University of Missouri. The materials are still at the University of Missouri and are waiting to be analyzed.Applications to be a Synovus Scholar next year are due on March 24, 2014.

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