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Ghostly Horsewomen (1911)

Ghostly Horsewomen (1911)

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Published by draculavanhelsing
The World's News 1911 (Sep 23)
The World's News 1911 (Sep 23)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Nov 01, 2013
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05/20/2014

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The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 23 September 1911, page 7National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128268826
Mysteriesofthe
Australian
Bush
THESILENT
HORSEWOMAN
WHOWASSHE?
By
FRANK
KEEN.
HMONG
remarkableand
Inexplic
ableincidentsofthe
magnifi
cent
Australian
bush,
thefol
lowing
willbefoundofinteresttbmanyreadersof TheWorld s
News.
The
particulars
come
from
a
reliable
source,andtoany
doubtfulreaderIdirect
personal
referencetothe
names
andaddressesofthe
two
Sydney
residents
given
at
the
conclusionof
the
narrative.Thisisthe
story:Years
ago,
on
themain
travelling
stock
route
between
Boggabri
andTambar
Springs(New
South
Wales),
there
was
a
small
camping
reserve
fenced
on
threesides.
Through
thelowerendofthe
reserve
ran
Coxe s
Creek
very
often
at
this
particularspotsandy
and
dry.
The
place
was
knownto
travellers
as
theGhost
Camp;
andfromthestatementsOf
drovers,
it
isevidentthat
something
of
an
extraordinary
character
more
than
once
took
place
there,
particularly
inconnectionwith
slock,
butthe
appended
narrativeis
probably
themost
unexplainable
and
mysterious
of
all.
Somewhere
inthelatesixties
or
early
seven
ties.
a
sheep
drover
named
Peter
Brown,
and
his
mate,
named
Christy,campedthere
ona
certain
moonlight
night.These
men
were
mates,
and
asa
ruledrovefromthemain
nor
therndistricts.Onthis
occasion,
it
isunderstood,
they
came
fromMillie,betweenMoreeand
Narrabri,with
a
mobof
sheep.On
the
night
referred
to,
Christy
hadthe
first
watch,
andwhen12o clockcame,hecalled
Peter;and,
aa
thehorses
were
veryrestless,heaskedhimbeforehewenttobed
to
help
himtoballupthe
horses
andshorten
theirhobbles.80the
animals
were
drivenintothe
sandy
creek
against
thefence,andwhile
Christy
was
in
thecreek,
Peterstood
on.
thebank.
 
creek,
Peterstood
on.
Suddenly
Petercalledout,
 Here s
someone
on
horseback.
Then,
again:
 My
,
it
Is
a
woman.**Hecalled
out
again. Hey,
what
brings
youherethistimeof
night?
No
answer
came-only
the
figure
on
horseback
bent
low
over
the
pommel
of
theMiddle.Steedandrider
were
clearly
visibleinthe
moonlight.
Again
Brown
calledout,
 Hey,
can tyou
.peak?
What sthematter? but
no
answercame.
On
went
the
silent
night
riderupthebad
of
the
creek,
andthen
disappeared
in
an
instant.One
man
hadseen,and
oneman
had
not
-only
heardin
amazement
thevoiceofhiscomrade.
Brown
said.
 My
,
Iwon t
stop
hereany
longer, and,
as
it
was
moonlight,
heandhis
mate
roundedupthe
sheep,
andtookthemfurther
on.
According
tothestatementsmade
to
the
writer,Christy
and
PeterBrown
are
described
in
the
following
terms:-Bothsensible,truth
ful.
and
level-headed
men.
Thelatterafterwards
kept
an
hotelin
Waterloo,Sydney,
andIn
retailing
thestory
many
times,
borewit
ness
totheterribleeffecttheincidenthaduponhim.Bothheandhiswife
are
now
dead.
His
mate
alsotellsthe
story-steed
andfemalerider
were
but
an
apparition
ofthenight.The
following
Isthe
extraordinaryexperi
ence
ofanotherdroverwho
knows
theabovestory,
being personallyacquainted
with
both
principals
concernedinitSomeyearsagohe
was
employed
by
Mr.JamesSevt,ofMooki
Springs,
and
was
inthewintertimeseatin
to
Gunnedah
on
businessofhis
employer*-
Re
turning,
the
fitgfttwas
cleatandfrosty,
andwhencrossing-
between.WalhollowandthePine
Ridge,
the
aold
was.
intense,almost
to
a
freest^degree.
-
HeoaUedin
at
thePineRidtft
Hotel,
aai
had
a
stimulant.He
thenmountedhis
Mne,.
andtoreachhiscamphad-Idfollowtheemitride*f.the
ridge;
round
x
a
distanceofilott
three
miles*About
thisitataaee
from
the
hotel,
or
 thepoint,
as
the
place
was
called,
wasan
old,deserted
shepherd s
hut.Asthe
rider
came
round
a
point
intheridge,
lie
could
see
thehutbrilliantly
-lit
up.
He
was
glad
tonote
this,
as,
being
cold,
he
thought
some
traveller
was
camping
there,andhecouldhave
awarm.
Continuing
his
Journey,
everytime
he
came
round
a
point
in
the
ridgfe
hecould
see
thelight,batwhenhe
cameto
theopenspaceinfront
of
thehut,
everything
wasin
darkness.Hewent

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