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COMFORT FOR TIRED FEET.pdf

COMFORT FOR TIRED FEET.pdf

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY J. R. MILLER, D.D.




A GOOD many people come to
the close of the day with tired
feet. There are those whose
duties require them to walk
all the day. There are the
men who patrol the city's streets, the guardi-
ans of our homes. There are the postmen
who bring letters to our doors. There are
the messengers who are always hurrying to
and fro on their errands. There are the pil-
grims who travel on foot along the hard,
dusty highways. There are those who fol-
low the plow or perform other parts of the
farmer's work. Then there are sales-people
in the great stores who scarcely ever have
an opportunity to sit down. Countless
persons in factories and mills have the same
experience.
BY J. R. MILLER, D.D.




A GOOD many people come to
the close of the day with tired
feet. There are those whose
duties require them to walk
all the day. There are the
men who patrol the city's streets, the guardi-
ans of our homes. There are the postmen
who bring letters to our doors. There are
the messengers who are always hurrying to
and fro on their errands. There are the pil-
grims who travel on foot along the hard,
dusty highways. There are those who fol-
low the plow or perform other parts of the
farmer's work. Then there are sales-people
in the great stores who scarcely ever have
an opportunity to sit down. Countless
persons in factories and mills have the same
experience.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 01, 2013
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11/01/2013

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COMFORT FOR TIRED FEETBY J. R. MILLER, D.D.A GOOD many people come tothe close of the day with tiredfeet. There are those whoseduties require them to walk all the day. There are themen who patrol the city's streets, the guardi-ans of our homes. There are the postmenwho bring letters to our doors. There arethe messengers who are always hurrying toand fro on their errands. There are the pil-grims who travel on foot along the hard,dusty highways. There are those who fol-low the plow or perform other parts of thefarmer's work. Then there are sales-peoplein the great stores who scarcely ever havean opportunity to sit down. Countlesspersons in factories and mills have the sameexperience. There are thousands of womenin their home work who rarely stop to restduring the long days. Upstairs and down[247] :\ Ci^e Bcautr of ^elf^Controlagain, from kitchen to nursery, out to themarket and to the store, in and out, fromearly morning till late at night, these busywomen are ever plodding in their house-wifely duties.
 
"Man works from sun to sun;Woman's work is never done.'*No wonder, then, that there are so manysore and tired feet at the end of the day.How welcome night is to the armies of wearypeople who then drop their tools or theiryardsticks or their implements of toil, andhurry home again. How good it is to sitdown and rest when the day's tasks are done !There would seem to be need in a book likethis for a chapter for people with tired feet.What is the comfort for such? For onething, there is the thought of duty done. Itis always a comfort, when one is tired, to re-flect that one has grown tired in doing one's-proper work. A squandered day, a day spentin idleness, may not leave such tired feet inthe evening, but neither does it give the sweet[248]Comfort for Citeti feetpleasure that a busy day gives, even with itsblistered and aching feet.There is a great deal of useless standingor walking that does not get this comfort.There are young men who stand on the streetcorners all day and sometimes far into thenight, who must have weary feet when at lastthey turn homeward. Yet they have in theirhearts no such compensating satisfaction asthose who have toiled all the long hours insome honorable calling. Idleness brings onlyshame and self-contempt. Then there are
 
certain kinds of occupation which give toweariness no sweetening comfort. A dayspent in sinful work may make the feettired, but has no soothing for them in theevening's rest.But all duty well done has its restful peaceof heart when the day's tasks are finishedand laid down. Conscience whispers, " Youwere faithful to-day; you did all that wasgiven you to do ; you did not shirk norskimp." The conscience is the whisper of God and its commendation gives comfort.[249]Cl^e IBtmtv of telecontrolBut does God really take notice of one'sdaily, common work,— plowing, delivering let-ters, selling goods and cleaning house? Yes;we serve God just as truly in our daily task-work as in our praying and Bible reading.The woman who keeps the great church clean,sweeping the dust from the aisles, is servingher Lord as well, if her heart be right, as thegorgeously robed minister who performs hissacred part in the holy worship. In one of his poems George Macdonald speaks of stand-ing in a vast church, with its marble acres,worn with knees and feet, and seeing priestsflitting among the candles, men coming andgoing, and then a poor woman with herbroom, bowed to her work on the floors,and hearing the Master's voice, saying,"Daughter, thou sweepest well my floor."

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