Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
MISTAKEN MINISTERING.pdf

MISTAKEN MINISTERING.pdf

Ratings: (0)|Views: 14|Likes:
Published by glennpease

By J. R. Miller, D.D.

We are to serve others. When we find God
we at once think of our brother. We begin to
be like Christ only when we begin to be help-
ful. But many mistakes are made by those
who are only learning this lesson. Our very
eagerness ofttimes leads us to try to help un-
wisely.

By J. R. Miller, D.D.

We are to serve others. When we find God
we at once think of our brother. We begin to
be like Christ only when we begin to be help-
ful. But many mistakes are made by those
who are only learning this lesson. Our very
eagerness ofttimes leads us to try to help un-
wisely.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Nov 01, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

11/01/2013

pdf

text

original

 
MISTAKEN MINISTERING.By J. R. Miller, D.D." A little bit of patience often makes the sunshine come,And a little bit of love makes a very happy home;A little bit of hope makes a rainy day look gay,And a little bit of charity makes glad a weary way."We are to serve others. When we find Godwe at once think of our brother. We begin tobe like Christ only when we begin to be help-ful. But many mistakes are made by thosewho are only learning this lesson. Our veryeagerness ofttimes leads us to try to help un-wisely.A friend tells of a young girl who recentlybecame a Christian, and at once felt that shemust serve somebody. But she did not knowwhere or how to begin. She looked aboutamong her companions— she was then attend-ing a large girls' school— to see if there were78MISTAKEN MINISTERING.79any to whom she could be of use. There wasone girl who was greatly burdened with herwork. This eager young Christian thoughtshe might do for this girl services which wouldrelieve her. So she began to help her in car-ing for her room. But she soon learned thather assistance was not welcome ; indeed, it wasresented. She found that she had hurt her
 
friend's feelings, and that she could not con-tinue the help she had begun to give.Her mistake was that she was doing servicemerely for the sake of service. She wantedto be helpful, and looking round saw that herewere things she might do. But the servinghad not come naturally.The incident suggests that help may neverbe rendered merely for the sake of doing some-thing. We may not go out some morning,saying that we want to do two or three kind-nesses before the sun sets, and choose certainpersons to whom we will do these kindnesses,without reference to their necessity or our ownduty to them. We give a man some money,for example ; but if he is in no real need we8o THE JOY OF SERVICE.have done him no kindness. A young man, inhis eagerness to be useful, may help his youngerbrother with his examples, working them forhim. But that is mistaken kindness ; the boywould better be left to work the exampleshimself, with no more than a helpful hint.Or take, again, the case of the young girlin school. She was eager to express her lovein some service, and she supposed she hadfound an opportunity. But her friend did notneed this help. She was not sick ; if shehad been, the serving would have been beau-tiful and natural, and no doubt would havebeen gratefully accepted. As it was, however,the ministering, though well meant, was littleshort of an impertinence. It was unwelcome,
 
and weakened rather than strengthened thebond of friendship between the two girls.It requires wisdom as well as tact to helpothers in truly good and beneficent ways.There is always danger of over-helping. Thereare some persons who never decline a favorthat any one is disposed to render to them.Children naturally accept whatever is givenMISTAKEN MINISTERING.8 1to them. Then there are older persons whoseem always to have a hand stretched out forhelp. Indolent people never refuse to allowothers to do their work for them. They areready to accept gifts, to have their burdenslightened, to have their hard tasks done forthem. But much of the help given to suchpeople is real unkindness to them. Too muchgiving to children only teaches them wrongways of living, gives them false ideas of theirown duty and responsibility and of what theyshould expect from others, and makes themless strong and self-reliant.Many a father says, "I had a hard and toil-some youth. I had to fight my own battlesunhelped. I am not going to have my chil-dren do as I had to do." So he makes lifewondrously easy for his boys, has everythingpossible done for them, and indulges them inevery wish. The good man forgets that what-ever is noble in his own character and worthyin his career he owes to the very hardshipsof his young days. It was in those struggles,tasks, and self-denials, that he got his manly

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->