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TALKING OF ONE'S AILMENTS.pdf

TALKING OF ONE'S AILMENTS.pdf

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
By J. R. Miller, D.D.

Some persons seem to enjoy being miser-
able. At least, they make far more of life's
discomforts than of its pleasant things. They
say very little about their mercies, but a great
deal about their miseries. When you meet
them some bright morning, and ask, " How
are you to-day ? n you will have to listen to a
long recital of personal ills ; and you will es-
cape well if you are not favored also with a
dismal catalogue of the distresses and suffer-
ings of all the members of your friend's family.
By J. R. Miller, D.D.

Some persons seem to enjoy being miser-
able. At least, they make far more of life's
discomforts than of its pleasant things. They
say very little about their mercies, but a great
deal about their miseries. When you meet
them some bright morning, and ask, " How
are you to-day ? n you will have to listen to a
long recital of personal ills ; and you will es-
cape well if you are not favored also with a
dismal catalogue of the distresses and suffer-
ings of all the members of your friend's family.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 01, 2013
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01/19/2014

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TALKING OF ONE'S AILMENTS.By J. R. Miller, D.D." Thy trouble, loss, or greatest grief,May in thy darkest dayFill black despair with no relief,Find in the gloom no ray ;But struggle on, be brave and strong,And to the front look forth ;This world is not completely wrong— Press on and test thy worth."Some persons seem to enjoy being miser-able. At least, they make far more of life'sdiscomforts than of its pleasant things. Theysay very little about their mercies, but a greatdeal about their miseries. When you meetthem some bright morning, and ask, " Howare you to-day ? n you will have to listen to along recital of personal ills ; and you will es-cape well if you are not favored also with adismal catalogue of the distresses and suffer-ings of all the members of your friend's family.214TALKING OF ONE'S AILMENTS.21$You learn by and by, if you are a busy per-son, not to make inquiries which will lead tosuch extended confessions of wretchedness.
 
These people seem to think there is somesort of merit in having ailments or afflictionsto speak of to others. It appears to them tobe an altogether undesirable and unworthystate to be in, when they can say they arevery well, with nothing to complain of. Theyappear to be happy only when something iswrong with them, so that they can make ap-peal to the sympathy of their friends.What is the real secret of the commonness,the almost universality, of this habit of mind ?For it must be confessed that there are com-paratively few persons with whom one meetswho are not addicted to this unwholesomeway of talking about their ills and ailments,real or imaginary. What is the motive forit ? Why does it appear to give so muchpleasure ? Is it prompted by an unhealthycraving for sympathy ? One who is alwayswell, and who never complains, is not commis-erated. Nobody says, " How pale you look !2l6THE JOY OF SERVICE.I am very sorry you are such a sufferer ; "and many persons seem to find great comfortin being pitied in this way. They wouldrather have others speak to them of their ail-ments than of their fine health.But the best that can be said about such acraving is that it is miserably unwholesome.It is exaggerated selfishness, too, which takesdelight in burdening others with the recitalof all one's little bodily pains or discomforts — how many hours one lay awake last night,
 
what a hard cough one has, how one's headached all the morning, how one suffers fromrheumatism or neuralgia, how one's digestionhas been bad for a week, and the endless cata-logue of ills to which flesh is heir. Supposeyou had a restless night, or did cough forhours, or were nervous ; or suppose you havepains in your back, or in your head, or havea heavy cold,— why must you go over all thedetails of your wretchedness in talking withany one you can get to listen to the recital ?What good comes of speaking about these un-pleasant things ?TALKING OF ONE'S AILMENTS.21JThe fact is, that people do not like to hearsuch unwholesome complaining unless they aregiven to the same morbid habit themselves,and can get you to listen sympathetically totheir story, which they will probably try tomake more touching than yours. There reallyis no virtue in being miserable ; it is far betterto be well and strong. Then, even if one hasactual infirmities, aches, or disorders of anykind, one has no right to display them beforeothers ; one would far better endure the dis-comfort silently, and be sweet, brave, andcheerful in the presence of one's friends andneighbors.It is immeasurably better to talk about theten thousand comforts, blessings, and pleas-ures of one's life, than about the few painsand miseries. It is better for one's self ; forwe are building character out of our habits,and we would better build into our life thegold and silver and precious stones of good

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