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Five Questions with Marguerite Wilson

Five Questions with Marguerite Wilson

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Fiber artist Marguerite Wilson, a student of Vaastu architecture and sacred geometry, creates beautiful handmade quilts. Santa Fe Creative Tourism is proud to present her workshops: Finding Order in Times of Chaos and Building a Vaastu House in the Twenty-First Century.
Fiber artist Marguerite Wilson, a student of Vaastu architecture and sacred geometry, creates beautiful handmade quilts. Santa Fe Creative Tourism is proud to present her workshops: Finding Order in Times of Chaos and Building a Vaastu House in the Twenty-First Century.

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Published by: SantaFe CreativeTourism on Nov 03, 2013
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 Fiber artist Marguerite Wilson, a student of Vaastu architecture and sacred geometry, createsbeautiful handmade quilts. Santa Fe Creative Tourism is proud to present her workshops:  FindingOrder in Times of Chaos and  Building a Vaastu House in the Twenty-First Century. For more information, please visit margueritewilson.com or santafecreativetourism.org.
Five Questions with Marguerite Wilson
 All images © Marguerite Wilson. Used with permission.
 SFCT:
What do you wish you had known when you were first starting out as an artist? 
MW:
 That I should learn to draw. I considered my sister "the Artist" and I was "the Intellectual." What I did not ever do was believe I could learn to draw the way my sister did, so I arrived at art by  working linearly, weaving and putting fabrics together in quilts. Now I want to add birds to my quilting so I can give my rendition of Attar's story, "The Conference of the Birds." I already did thestory of Noah's Birds, which meant adding the birds to my water quilt base. The Ark did not fit in thesecond quilt in the series, although I tried it many different ways. I felt like I had a dock full of Arksthat were not "seaworthy" in my mind's eye.
 
 SFCT:
What has been your most memorable or influential experience as an artist? 
MW:
 I have had many outstanding workshop experiences, but two of them really stand out. I metHelen Davis in Boulder, Colorado, took a class from her and then attended her design salon for 13 years. I knew nothing when I started out about design, and with her guidance and wisdom, I learnedhow to look at art with very profound guidelines. She was most helpful in getting to the essence of creating art and stripping away what was not essential, and I am truly indebted to her. I also metNancy Crow, who taught me how to use a design wall to "audition" fabric. She also taught me to really look at color and use lots of it in a quilt, even colors I did not know I liked.
"Explosion." All images © Marguerite Wilson. Used with permission.
 SFCT:
 How do you prepare for working in the studio or in the field? Describe your process: are youmethodical or adaptive, analytical or intuitive? 
MW:
 When I am working in my studio, I assemble what fabrics I think I will need, and then I try outdifferent combinations. I simply start somewhere, and see where that will take me. As I stand back, I
 
ask myself if the piece is "singing." Sometimes, I will search and search until I find the right color orcombination of materials and then something starts to happen that I like. Other times, I will feel that Ihave not gotten to where I want, and I will start all over. It helps to work on several pieces at once. Ifind as I put attention on one piece, I can be problem solving on another piece I am not directly  working on. I always tell people, "This looks easy, but it is not."
 SFCT:
 Have you ever seen a work of art and thought, "I wish I had done that..."? 
MW:
 Yes, this happens constantly. I have many friends that are artists that I have known for a longtime, and I often think "I wish I had done that" when I see their latest works. I fell in love with DaleChihuly's red glass creations when I first saw them. I loved how each piece of blown glass wasdifferent, and how they could be assembled differently each time they were put up. Today I just saw apiece by Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry in the SAQA newsletter that I love.
 SFCT:
 In his memoirs, Ernest Hemingway famously describes the starting point of each of hisworks: “All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence you know.” Howdoes this idea apply to your own art? 
MW:
Right now, right here, I am slowing down to see the world in gratitude and beauty. I haveloosened the bonds of knowing to allow not-knowing, surprise, rawness, and bounty. I am listeningfor the speech of birds, the language of flowers, the wisdom of clouds to inform me. The world is a vast and mysterious and wonderful place, and I am trying to meet it and let it change the way I seemyself. In my art, there is a journey into a new land that I am constantly embarking upon, a universeI have not yet visited.

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