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Writing Messianic Jewish Studies

Writing Messianic Jewish Studies

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This study discusses the four main fundamentals needed to writing a Messianic Jewish study. The purpose of this article is to express the idea on how to create articles, bible studies and even notes that can be used for public speaking engagements. By providing Bible enthusiasts with this article, we hope to encourage others into writing new Messianic articles that would capture the attention of avid Bible lovers.
This study discusses the four main fundamentals needed to writing a Messianic Jewish study. The purpose of this article is to express the idea on how to create articles, bible studies and even notes that can be used for public speaking engagements. By providing Bible enthusiasts with this article, we hope to encourage others into writing new Messianic articles that would capture the attention of avid Bible lovers.

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Categories:Types, Presentations
Published by: Hillel Ben Yochanan, MRabbi on Nov 03, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/13/2015

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1
 W 
RITING
M
ESSIANIC
S
TUDIES
101
 
BY
MR
ABBI
H
ILLEL
B
EN
Y
OCHANAN
 November 3, 2013
Thesis Statement
 or
The Introductory Paragraph
 
Transitional Sentence
Paragraph 1 Paragraph 2
Transitional Sentence
Paragraph 1 Paragraph 2
Transitional Sentence Summary
 of information covered. Whenever a Bible enthusiast desires to write a Bible study, a tract or even prepare a speech outline,
there’s
four main points that really needs to be covered.
Before covering these four points of interests, I would first like discuss the reasons why we write
.
We tend to write about the things that we’re
passionate about. Our passion tends to hit the
 
2
pleasure centers of the brain. It is as if though when we talk about the things that we enjoy, we tend to hit that happy, fuzzy feeling within ourselves where
we’re just happy about what it is that we do and say.
A lot of times, just discussing that particular item of interest simply allows for us to reenact in our minds
the joy of doing the actual thing that we’re discussing.
As a result, we write. When we write about the things that we enjoy or
find important to us, it’s important to identify the audience. For example, I wouldn’t be effective talking
about baseball if everyone in my audience enjoys
football. I also wouldn’t be effective speaking
negatively about football if the entire audience views football in a positive sense, either. So when we write,
it’s important that we appeal to our audience’
s attention or affection; that way, they can identify with
us in whatever it is that we’re saying so that they too
 can appreciate what we enjoy most (in our case, that would be Messiah).
 After discussing the reasons why we write, I would now like to discuss the four main points that really needs to be covered, being The Thesis Statement, The Introductory Paragraph, Transitional Sentences, and The Summary
.
The Thesis Statement
 is a simple sentence that summarizes what the entire article, tract, or Bible
 
3
study is all about. Unlike The Thesis Statement,
An Introductory Paragraph
 is a compilation of four to five sentences that introduce the audience as to what the article is all about, which we will discuss in a moment. Every single sentence in the article should somehow support the thesis statement. If one sentence in the entire
article doesn’t support either
The Thesis Statement (or The Introductory Paragraph by that matter)
, then it’s quite
possible that the sentence
doesn’t even belong
to begin with and should be completely removed, because to keep the unwanted sentence is simply going to distract your
audience’s attention into something irrelevant; they’re
going to miss the main points that you really want for them to get with irrelevant information in bring up in their minds the unwanted things you do not want them to bring up.
The Introductory Paragraph
 is quite different
from the Thesis Statement. There’s an actual formula
that excellent writers and public speakers utilize. The formula for the paragraph looks something like this:
The thesis statement goes here
. I talk about w
hy I’m
the subject expert matter. I identify my audience and provide them with the main reason why they can
relate to what I’m talking about. I now talk about who
we are as a community and what I intend to do with this topic (i.e., entertain, inform, discuss, storytell).

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