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Strategy+Business Summer 2013.pdf

Strategy+Business Summer 2013.pdf

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Strategy+Business Summer 2013
Strategy+Business Summer 2013

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06/18/2014

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Published by Booz & Company
 www.strategy-business.com
A.G. LAFLEY
 DRONE MAKERS
 HEALTHCARE WITH AN
Summer 2013 $12.95Display until August 27, 2013
THIS YEAR’S
 
study of the incoming class of chief executives
 
-- Emily Cavanagh
Program for Leadership Development 2012
 
I HAD VERY HIGH EXPECTATIONS.
I CAN TELL YOU THAT THIS PROGRAM MET THEM ALL.”
-- Yannick Hausmann
Advanced Management Program 2012
 
I LEARNED TO CONNECT THE DOTS
FROM FINANCE TO STRATEGY TO LEADERSHIP TO OPERATIONS AND MORE.”
The world’s top executives often need to step outside their organizations to acquire the skills, knowledge, and leadership to successfully address today’s critical business issues. The Harvard Business School Executive Education comprehensive leadership programs are where they convene.
clp_info
@
hbs.edu
 | 
www
.exed.hbs.edu/pgm/clp/ 
 
-- Emily Cavanagh
Program for Leadership Development 2012
 
I HAD VERY HIGH EXPECTATIONS.
I CAN TELL YOU THAT THIS PROGRAM MET THEM ALL.”
-- Yannick Hausmann
Advanced Management Program 2012
 
I LEARNED TO CONNECT THE DOTS
FROM FINANCE TO STRATEGY TO LEADERSHIP TO OPERATIONS AND MORE.”
The world’s top executives often need to step outside their organizations to acquire the skills, knowledge, and leadership to successfully address today’s critical business issues. The Harvard Business School Executive Education comprehensive leadership programs are where they convene.
clp_info
@
hbs.edu
 | 
www
.exed.hbs.edu/pgm/clp/ 
 
 We chose the title “Captains in Dis-ruption” for the lead feature story of this issue—by Ken Favaro, Per-Ola Karlsson, and Gary L. Neilson (
 page 40 
)—explicitly to contrast  with captains
of  
 disruption. In other  words, we’re not talking about the charismatic CEOs who come into office roaring about the dangers of tradition and complacency, promot-ing upheaval as a turnaround strat-egy, gratuitously marginalizing and scapegoating the previous leader-ship, and then burning out, leaving their companies in a state of back-lash and collapse. (The latest promi-nent example, as I write this, is Ron  Johnson at J.C. Penney.)The most effective CEOs today are steady, collaborative chief execu-tives—those who look for stability in all the chaotic places. They face down disruptive events and trends by planning and preparing for the time after crisis, and by acting in harmony with the people of their enterprise. Several articles in this issue sug-gest that the trends are in their favor. For example, “Portrait of the Incom-ing Class” (
 page 52 
), which tracks the proportions of planned to un-planned CEO successions in 2012, finds that boards of directors on average are less inclined to fire their CEOs reactively, and more inclined to deliberately develop a pipeline of leadership acumen. A similar point is made by the former CEO of Procter & Gamble A.G. Lafley and his long-time advisor, dean of the Rotman School of Management Roger Mar-tin, in “Leading with Intellectual Integrity” (
 page 60 
). While at P&G, they redesigned the strategic plan-ning process to cultivate more co-herent and rigorous thinking among fast-track executives.  Jon Katzenbach and DeAnne  Aguirre, who lead the Katzenbach Center (which coordinates Booz & Company’s research on organiza-tional culture and change), argue that the CEO’s most important role is as a leader of the company’s cul-ture (
 page 22 
). On page 11, CEO Tom Fanning of Southern Compa-ny, an innovative power utility based near Atlanta, explains how he fos-ters collaboration across functional disciplines, and how this has led to many of the firm’s most profitable and intriguing energy initiatives. This issue also contains a note- worthy Thought Leader interview  with David Kantor, the influential author of
Reading the Room 
 (
 page 90 
); a list of five principles for “re-imagining” your digital identity, from three leaders of the new team known as Booz Digital (
 page 34 
); a compelling profile of AeroViron-ment, an idiosyncratic manufacturer of drones and innovative battery sys-tems (
 page 78 
); an intriguing asser-tion that driverless vehicle technol-ogy could transform the long-haul trucking industry (
 page
); and a look at the consumer-centric busi-ness model for healthcare (
 page 6
) that is emerging as hospitals and healthcare companies address the disruption facing their industry. Whether you’re standing be-hind it, cheering it on, or facing off against it, disruption can be exhaust-ing. If you’re a CEO—or a business leader of any type—you’ve already learned, at least somewhat, to take it in stride. After the past several years of uncertainty, we’re all learning to do so. Or maybe we’ve just been liv-ing in disruption for so long that it’s starting to look like equilibrium.
Art Kleiner
Editor-in-Chief
kleiner_art@strategy-business.com
   I   l   l  u  s   t  r  a   t   i  o  n    b  y   L  a  r  s   L  e  e   t  a  r  u
Stability in Chaos
 c  omm ent  
 e d i  t   o’   s l   et  t   e
 
1
 e d i  t   o’   s l   et  t   e

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