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Accenture Outlook | Do you have the skills to compete?

Accenture Outlook | Do you have the skills to compete?

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Published by Accenture
A new Accenture survey shows that executives know a skills gap persists in their organizations and that it threatens their competitiveness. Fortunately, they’re willing to increase training investments to close the gap.
A new Accenture survey shows that executives know a skills gap persists in their organizations and that it threatens their competitiveness. Fortunately, they’re willing to increase training investments to close the gap.

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Categories:Types, Business/Law
Published by: Accenture on Nov 04, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/25/2013

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Talent & Organization
Do you have the skills to compete?
By David Smith, Katherine LaVelle, Breck Marshall and Susan Cantrell
David Smith
is the senior managing director of Accenture Talent & Organization. david.y.smith@accenture.com
Katherine LaVelle
is a managing director responsible for Accenture Talent & Organization in North America.katherine.d.lavelle@accenture.com
Breck Marshall
 is a managing director in Accenture Talent & Organization. breck.t.marshall@accenture.com
Susan M. Cantrell
is a research fellow at the Accenture Institute for High Performance.susan.m.cantrell@accenture.com The
Outlook Point of View 
 series offers insights about leading trends and innovations across all industries.http://www.accenture.com/Outlook David Cudaback, Editor-in-Chief Craig Mindrum, Managing EditorJacqueline H. Kessler, Senior Editor
The world of talent, and the value of that talent, is changing. For several years, the need for people with highly sought specialty skills affected only some organizations—in particular, those seeking employees with backgrounds in science, technology and engineering. Today the news is that skills gaps—the disparity between the skills companies need to drive growth and innovation versus the skills that actually exist within their organizations and in the marketplace—are more prevalent across most industries. Executives are aware that they need to invest more in their people’s ongoing training so that workforces will have the skills their companies will need in the coming years.These are among the findings of a new report, the Accenture 2013 Skills and Employment Trends Survey: Perspectives on Training. For the research, Accenture surveyed 400 executives at large US companies to assess their hiring, staffing and training strategies. The survey shows that executives are aware that they do not have the right people in place to implement new strategies, especially in the age of digital business and at a time when competition—for customers and for talent—is coming from new players almost anywhere and everywhere across the globe. Meeting the skills gap challenge will depend on strong commitment and action across the full spectrum of talent management and HR, from new approaches to learning and training, to better recruiting and hiring techniques, to better performance management. The right strategies and tools exist; now they need to be applied appropriately to make sure the right people with the right skills are in place to meet the future needs of the business.
The skills gap is real, and it can hurt
According to the Accenture research, nearly half of those surveyed (46 percent) confirm that a skills gap persists for their business—that they do not have the skills they need to compete effectively in the coming years. Not surprisingly, few will be looking to cut the size of their workforce anytime soon: Almost two-thirds (62 percent) expect their full-time employee headcount to remain the same, and nearly one-third (31 percent) expect it to grow.
Point of View
October 2013, No. 1

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