Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
15Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Scag_Electrical

Scag_Electrical

Ratings:

4.5

(1)
|Views: 4,650|Likes:
Published by Fred
We will explain some of these principles using the PTO
circuit of an STT, Turf Tiger. Follow along referencing
the STT wiring diagram through the following steps.
Performing this example on an actual machine will help
you better understand the logical process of tracing
through a circuit.
We will explain some of these principles using the PTO
circuit of an STT, Turf Tiger. Follow along referencing
the STT wiring diagram through the following steps.
Performing this example on an actual machine will help
you better understand the logical process of tracing
through a circuit.

More info:

Published by: Fred on Aug 05, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/11/2014

pdf

text

original

 
RIDERS and WALK BEHINDS
   E   L   E   C   T   R   I   C   A   L   S   Y   S   T   E   M   S
RIDERS and WALK BEHINDS
-GENERAL INFORMATION-SYSTEM OPERATION-SCHEMATICS
   E   L   E   C   T   R   I   C   A   L   S   Y   S   T   E   M   S
Revision 8/2000
CLOSED WHEN ARMS ARE OUT
STARTER RELAY
INTERLOCK BLOCK DIAGRAM
SWITCH POSITIONS
LH CTRL ARMRH CTRL ARM
SEAT - CLOSED WHEN SITTING ON SEAT
BRAKE - CLOSED WHEN BRAKE IS ON
PTO - CLOSED WHEN PTO IS OFF
LH CTRL ARMRH CTRL ARMSEAT
BRAKEPTO
RUNCRANK
+
BATTERY
KEYSWITCH
IGNITION
ARMS-OUT
INTERLOCK MODULE
ORG
BRN
PINKLT BLUE
REDGRN
WHT
BLK
SEA
T
-ON
BRAKE-ON
PTO-OFF
+12V
STARTER
KILL
GROUND
 
2
ELECTRICAL TRAINING MANUAL
NOTES
 
3
ELECTRICAL TRAINING MANUAL
ELECTRICAL TRAINING MANUAL
The most basic question asked by many people is: Whatis electricity? Without getting too complex, we’ll have toimagine that we can look inside materials common in oureveryday lives, so that we can see the atoms that makeup every material known to man. See Figure 1-1.Electricity is a movement of electrons, the negativelycharged particles that are a part of every atom.Electrons are moved from atom to atom as a result of many different conditions, such as friction, which canresult in static electricity, or from light, using aphotoelectric cell, or electric eye. See Figure 1-2.In our use of electricity in Scag equipment, a chemicalreaction in a battery, or the effects of magnetism from analternator are the ways of causing electrons to move,creating electron flow, or electricity.
Figure 1-1 AtomsFigure 1-2 Atoms Moving Through Conductor
Voltage is the electrical pressure that causes electronflow. Current is the measure of electron flow, the amountof electricity that is moving through a material. Current ismeasured in amperes, or amps. For current to flow, weneed a continuous path, or circuit. In a battery poweredsystem, this is a path between the battery positiveterminal and the battery negative terminal, connectedthrough the electrical system. See Figure 1-3.The materials used in an electrical circuit are importantfor proper system performance and operation. Theatoms in some materials have loosely held electrons thatcan move easily from atom to atom through the materialwith little to oppose electron flow. These types of materials are called conductors. Examples are copper,aluminum, and iron, the most common materials used forcomponents such as wires, connectors, and switches.Other materials have tightly held electrons, and allow littleelectron movement. These materials are calledinsulators. Rubber, plastic, and ceramic materials are themost common insulators, and are used to keep electricityflow isolated to only the intended conductors.Even in conductors with little opposition to electron flow,there is still some friction as the electrons bounce off each other, and other atoms. Like the friction we feelwhen we rub our hands together, the movement createsheat. This electrical friction is called resistance. As youmight expect, a material of high resistance would allowless current to pass through compared to a material of low resistance, with the same voltage applied. Thischaracteristic of electricity can be compared directly tothe flow of water through a hose, where a high resistanceresults in an obvious reduction in flow, even though thesupply pressure stays the same.
Figure 1-3 Basic Electrical Circuit

Activity (15)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Connie Vignes liked this
Kenneth Brown liked this
felipeamaro liked this
brix1234 liked this
sdjourneay liked this
John Bowers liked this
my2laaccount liked this
my2laaccount liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->