Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
7Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Digital Publishing Makes Magazines Greener

Digital Publishing Makes Magazines Greener

Ratings:

4.5

(2)
|Views: 197 |Likes:
By David Whitehead

Because every publication I have ever been associated with was produced with computers, I have spent my entire career wondering if we would always be publishing with ink and paper. Unlike most publishing professionals of my generation, I was never bonded to the idea of chewing up pulp. Although I have no timeframes in mind for going totally digital with Business Insider Magazine, I could end up making this decision before I retire with the last of the baby boomers. “We’ll do print as long as it makes sense” is the mantra espoused by many in today’s publishing industry. For many, it’s no longer about if but when digital will become dominant over traditional print.
Five months prior to this writing, we began phasing out our online .pdf edition of Business Insider Magazine in favor of the high-resolution Adobe Flash digital format. So far, we have cultivated additional online readers equal to about 15 percent of our print distribution, and this total continues to increase over time.
This impressed me because current platforms for “flip-page” magazines require readers to navigate and zoom through vertically designed magazine pages on their horizontal computer screens. Despite this and other limitations in using conventional computers as portable reading devices, a core segment of computer users are choosing to read digital publications. In fact, some publishers are producing horizontally designed versions of their print publications for easy viewing on conventional computer display screens. And this is just the beginning.
Print Publishers Largely Divided on
the Impact of Digital Publishing
I recently participated in an online discussion with publishing professionals from around the United States on their experiences with digital publishing. The general consensus is digital will play a significant role in our future, but how much impact it will have or if it will at some point eliminate print is hotly debated.
First, even though significant reader gains have been made because these readers are coming from the World Wide Web it is difficult to qualify them to know if they are relevant to a particular publication’s print display advertisers. In fact, the “paper defenders” point out there is no collected data indicating print advertisers will buy more because a publication is available online as a digital flip-magazine. I personally take this observation with a grain of salt because print publishers made similar justifications for ignoring the impact of the Internet. They were stunned when entire classes of traditional display advertising migrated online and stayed there. Forward-thinking publishers understand the obvious potential for this technology to catch on in a big way. There are also premium publication platforms that do track the full range of reader statistics. ZMags, a Boston-based company, asserts that publishers are using their advanced platform to qualify readers, earn revenue and know the cost/revenue ratios of the digital magazines in relation to the numbers of online readers.

MORE...
By David Whitehead

Because every publication I have ever been associated with was produced with computers, I have spent my entire career wondering if we would always be publishing with ink and paper. Unlike most publishing professionals of my generation, I was never bonded to the idea of chewing up pulp. Although I have no timeframes in mind for going totally digital with Business Insider Magazine, I could end up making this decision before I retire with the last of the baby boomers. “We’ll do print as long as it makes sense” is the mantra espoused by many in today’s publishing industry. For many, it’s no longer about if but when digital will become dominant over traditional print.
Five months prior to this writing, we began phasing out our online .pdf edition of Business Insider Magazine in favor of the high-resolution Adobe Flash digital format. So far, we have cultivated additional online readers equal to about 15 percent of our print distribution, and this total continues to increase over time.
This impressed me because current platforms for “flip-page” magazines require readers to navigate and zoom through vertically designed magazine pages on their horizontal computer screens. Despite this and other limitations in using conventional computers as portable reading devices, a core segment of computer users are choosing to read digital publications. In fact, some publishers are producing horizontally designed versions of their print publications for easy viewing on conventional computer display screens. And this is just the beginning.
Print Publishers Largely Divided on
the Impact of Digital Publishing
I recently participated in an online discussion with publishing professionals from around the United States on their experiences with digital publishing. The general consensus is digital will play a significant role in our future, but how much impact it will have or if it will at some point eliminate print is hotly debated.
First, even though significant reader gains have been made because these readers are coming from the World Wide Web it is difficult to qualify them to know if they are relevant to a particular publication’s print display advertisers. In fact, the “paper defenders” point out there is no collected data indicating print advertisers will buy more because a publication is available online as a digital flip-magazine. I personally take this observation with a grain of salt because print publishers made similar justifications for ignoring the impact of the Internet. They were stunned when entire classes of traditional display advertising migrated online and stayed there. Forward-thinking publishers understand the obvious potential for this technology to catch on in a big way. There are also premium publication platforms that do track the full range of reader statistics. ZMags, a Boston-based company, asserts that publishers are using their advanced platform to qualify readers, earn revenue and know the cost/revenue ratios of the digital magazines in relation to the numbers of online readers.

MORE...

More info:

Published by: Business Insider Magazine on Aug 05, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/03/2011

pdf

text

original

 
S
outh
B
ay
B
uSineSS
i
nSider
M
agazine
2
nd
i
SSue
2009
TECHNOLOGY INSIDER
B
ecause every publication I have ever been associated withwas produced with computers, I have spent my entire careerwondering i we would always be publishing with ink andpaper. Unlike most publishing proessionals o my generation, I wasnever bonded to the idea o chewing up pulp. Although I have notimerames in mind or going totally digital with
Business InsiderMagazine
, I could end up making this decision beore I retire withthe last o the baby boomers. “We’ll do print as long as it makessense” is the mantra espoused by many in today’s publishing indus-try. For many, it’s no longer about
i 
but
when
digital will becomedominant over traditional print.Five months prior to this writing, we began phasing out our online.pd edition o 
Business Insider Magazine
in avor o the high-reso-lution Adobe Flash digital ormat. So ar, wehave cultivated additional online readers equalto about 15 percent o our print distribution,and this total continues to increase over time.Tis impressed me because current platormsor “ip-page” magazines require readers tonavigate and zoom through vertically designedmagazine pages on their horizontal computerscreens. Despite this and other limitations inusing conventional computers as portable read-ing devices, a core segment o computer usersare choosing to read digital publications. In act,some publishers are producing horizontally de-signed versions o their print publications oreasy viewing on conventional computer displayscreens. And this is just the beginning.
Print Publishers Largely Divided onthe Impact of Digital Publishing 
I recently participated in an online discussion with publishingproessionals rom around the United States on their experienceswith digital publishing. Te general consensus is digital will play asignicant role in our uture, but how much impact it will have or i it will at some point eliminate print is hotly debated.First, even though signicant reader gains have been made be-cause these readers are coming rom the World Wide Web it is di-cult to qualiy them to know i they are relevant to a particularpublication’s print display advertisers. In act, the “paper deenders”point out there is no collected data indicating print advertisers willbuy more because a publication is available online as a digital ip-magazine. I personally take this observation with a grain o salt be-cause print publishers made similar justications or ignoring theimpact o the Internet. Tey were stunned when entire classes o traditional display advertising migrated online and stayed there.
Digital Publishing Makes Magazines Greener!
 By David Whitehead
Forward-thinking publishers understand the obvious potential orthis technology to catch on in a big way. Tere are also premiumpublication platorms that do track the ull range o reader statis-tics. ZMags, a Boston-based company, asserts that publishers areusing their advanced platorm to qualiy readers, earn revenue andknow the cost/revenue ratios o the digital magazines in relation tothe numbers o online readers.
Te Next echnology Wave Poisedto Rock Print Publishing 
What’s urther troubled traditional publishers already coping withthe worst crisis to hit our industry in decades is a new technologythat could make digital ormats the dominant publication media inthe not-too-distant uture.A new gadget hit technology consumers witha whisper while creating lively debate in theprint publishing community. It’s an e-bookreader called the Amazon Kindle. Marketedby Amazon.com, this device at rst glancelooks like a simple gizmo donning a small ver-tical screen with a typing keypad below it anda ew simple navigation buttons on the sides.I’ve seen ashier calculators, but like the un-assuming iPod, this device packs tremendouspower that will undoubtedly have a transor-mative impact on print publishers.What has drawn the ire o our industry pa-per pushers is its screen technology. Ratherthan using a traditional Liquid Crystal Dis-play (LCD) screen, it uses a new electropho-retic technology delivering print-sharp screenresolution that does not require battery-consuming backlighting.Conventional LCD screens are assembled mostly by hand throughan expensive bulk manuacturing process that must be conductedin a sterile environment. In act, the limitations o LCD technologyhave somewhat stymied the evolution o personal computers andother electronic devices. At least it has until now.Te newer generation screen displays will roll o the productionlines with a process similar to printing. Tey will be much cheaperto produce, lighter, can run or about a week on a battery charge, andare seen clearly without glare in bright sunlight. Advanced versionso new-generation screen technology are expected to be thin andexible. Imagine a magazine-sized screen that can be rolled up likea scroll and tucked away in your pocket. Some people are alreadycalling this “electric paper.” Sprint recently started an ad campaign toprep cell phone users or the paper-liberating devices to come.
Continued on page 29

Activity (7)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
Natasa Smirnov liked this
saniajax liked this
texgraphs liked this
Kush Sharma liked this
nitendra_kumar liked this
georecruitment liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->