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Opere d'Arte

Opere d'Arte

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Published by Alessandro Segato

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Published by: Alessandro Segato on Nov 05, 2013
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Florentine sculptor
Antonio Frilli
 was born in the middle of the 19th Century and he died in 1902. He specialized in marble and alabasterstatues for public and private customers. In 1860 he established his first and exclusive Atelier in via dei Fossi, Florence, where he used to work with few assistants on medium size refined painted alabasters and big white Carrara marble statues for private villas and monumental Cemeteries. Beautiful portraits and powerful marble Angels decorate famous Cemeteries such as "Porte Sante" and "Allori" in Florence.
[1]
 The marble portrait of the same sculptor was carved in his Atelier after his dead and it was placed on his Family Tomb in the monumental Cimitero degli Allori. Frilli and his Gallery were very famous in Europe, in the United States and in Australia as
 
he took part to several World's Fair with his Company collecting success and Grand Prizes. He was in Philadelphia for the Expo of 1876 and in 1881 his statues and garden furnitures were exhibited in the Italian Pavilion in Melbourne. In 1904, two years after his death, his son Umberto took part in the famous World Expo in Saint Louis with a few pieces of his Family Company, including a masterpiece of his father, "the woman on an hammock" in white Carrara marble. This beautiful statue won the Grand Prize and 6 gold medals.
[2]
 
[3]
 In 1999 the same masterpiece was sold by Sotheby's with an auction estimate of $ 800,000
[4]
 
 
 
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He was born in Rome and became a student of Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiariand Camillo Rusconi. His most familiar works are the colossal
Oceanus 
 or
Neptune 
 of the Trevi Fountain, Rome, after a
modello 
 by Giovanni Battista Maini, and four prominent tomb monuments in Rome. He sculpted the figures for the tomb of Benedict XIII (1734) in Santa Maria sopra Minerva, Rome, which was designed by the architect Carlo Marchionni, and for the tomb of Benedict XIV (1763–1770) in the Basilica of Saint Peter, completed with the help of his pupil Gaspare Sibilia. The third tomb at St Peter's on which he worked commemorates Maria Clementina Sobieski (1742), wife of the "Old Pretender", James Stuart, one of the Catholic Stuart claimants to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland. It is one of three monuments in St. Peter's dedicated to the deposed royal line of Stuart. The sculpture is in polychrome with an image of Maria Clementina in mosaic held aloft by Charity. The monument was conceived by the architect Filippo Barigioni, who provided preliminary sketches. Bracci also designed and sculpted the polychromatic tomb of Cardinal Giuseppe Renato Imperiali (1741)
 
in Sant'Agostino in Rome. His best known work is the colossal Oceanus— also known as Neptune — (after 1759) of theTrevi Fountain, Rome, where he was constrained to follow a plaster
modello 
 by Giovanni Battista Maini, who died before he could execute the marble. Bracci executed the Oceanus and the tritons when he took over work on the fountain. After the death of Nicola Salvi (1751) work was halted with only the foundations built. A few years later the works were assigned to Panini who was stopped when he started to make changes to the project. Bracci took over in 1761 and finished the fountain in 1763. Nicola Salvi and Pietro Bracci were longtime friends, both being members of Arcadia and members of the confraternity of the virtuosi at the Pantheon.There are several official busts of Benedict XIII by Bracci, and a terracotta (1724), conserved inPalazzo Venezia, Rome. The aged glare of the pope in the marble portrait was an image difficult to beautify. Like all sculptors in Rome since the 16th century, Bracci was often called upon to restore or complete Roman sculptures, such as the Capitoline Antinous, to render them suitable for display. Bracci died in Rome in 1773.
 
 
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Giuliano Finelli
 (1601–1653) was an Italian Baroque sculptor who emerged from the workshop ofBernini. He was born in Carrara to a family of marble masons in a town associated with mining of the stone, and he initially trained with Michelangelo Naccherino. He was active in Bernini's studio for a few years, but he broke with Bernini in 1629, when he felt slighted by the awarding of the choice commission of a
Saint Helena 
 statue for the crossing of St Peter's to Andrea Bolgi. He is also purported to have also been slighted by failure to be recognized as the detail master behind theApollo and
 
Daphne statue of Bernini.
[1]
 For some time, he found occasional work, often with the support of Pietro da Cortona.
 
The difference between the two sculptors, Bernini and Finelli, was slight. Finelli is highly meticulous about carving tiny details, a focus which often seems to drain from the greater emotion of the piece. The prolific Bernini was less conscious of lacy frillery in dress, and more centered on the psychology. The contrast can be seen in their portraits of a common patron, Cardinal Scipione Borghese. Bernini's portraint
[2]
 is animated, while Finelli's is more sober and has a slight downgaze.
[3]
 He also completed the image of Cardinal Giulio Antonio Santorio (c. 1630) at San Giovanni in Laterano. Within a few years of leaving the employ of Bernini, Finelli left for Naples with his pupil and nephew,Domenico Guidi. He is known best for a number of portraits and statues in the Chapel of San Gennaro in the cathedral of Cathedral in Naples. In Naples, he had to compete with the sculptor Cosimo Fanzago for commissions. Finelli died in Rome in 1653 of reasons unknown.

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